wine

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Art Food History

The Wines of Gala: Salvador Dalí’s Surrealist Wine Guide Republished for the First Time in 40 Years

November 2, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Last published in 1978, The Wines of Gala is Salvador Dalí’s eccentric guide to wine grapes and their origin. Filled with over 140 appropriated artworks and collages collected and created by Dalí, the book is an equally surreal follow-up to TASCHEN’s reprinting of the artist’s cookbook Les Diners de Gala. In addition to Jean-François Millet’s The Angelus, which was a constant point of reference in Dali’s works, visuals include a Bacchus-like kitten, and a sort of tableau vivant featuring Dali himself.

In keeping with Dalí’s efforts to create artwork based on his emotions, memories, and dreams, the artist chose to organize the wines in the book by how they influenced his mood. The groupings are appropriately imaginative classifications including such section titles as “Wines of Frivolity,” “Wines of the Impossible,” and “Wines of Light.” A section in the book also outlines Dalí’s method of ordering wine by emotional experience, quoting the artist’s famous credo: “A real connoisseur does not drink wine but tastes of its secrets.”

The 296-page wine bible published by TASCHEN is now available for pre-order. (via It’s Nice That)

 

 

 



Design Food

Printed Short Stories That Double as Wine Bottle Labels

November 17, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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All images via Reverse Innovation

Combining two of my favorite winter (or rather any season) activities is the project Librottiglia, a newly designed set of wines which feature short stories built into their labels. The texts are printed on textured paper stock, minimally designed, and secured to the bottle with a single piece of twine, providing an alternative to both digital methods of reading and traditional books. Not only are the selected works aesthetically matched to the bottle, but the content is also curated to align with the taste profiles, the characteristics of the work conceptually paired to each blend.

Three writers were selected to contribute to the project, each bringing their unique style to their matched wine. Journalist and satirist Danilo Zanelli contributes the mystery “Murder” to a Roero Arneis, “The Frog in the Belly,” a fable by Patrizia Laquidara is paired with an Anthos, and Regina Marques Nadaes’s love story “I Love You, Forget Me” compliments the winery’s Nebbiolo Roero.

The project is a partnership between the product design agency Reverse Innovation and Italian winery Matteo Correggia, and is named based off of the Italian translations of the words book (libro) and bottle (bottiglia). You can learn more about the project on Librottiglia’s website. (via designboom)

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Art Design Food

Stranger Wine: Hand-Blown Glass Wine Decanters by Etienne Meneau Mimic Blood Veins and Root Systems

October 6, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Artist Etienne Meneau creates radical interpretations of a traditional wine decanter by utilizing the abstracted forms of blood veins, hearts, and root systems. Each container from his “Strange Carafes” series is hand-blown from borosilicate, and while many of the objects are technically functional, others serve as sculptural objects with the wine permanently encased within. The depth and diameter of each piece is such that it perfectly contains a single bottle of wine. Meneau shares plenty of photos and videos of each limited-edition piece on a series of mini websites a\here. (via My Modern Met)

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Art

Wine Cork Portraits by Scott Gundersen

July 17, 2012

Christopher Jobson

I’ve been known to pocket the occasional sentimental wine cork, but that’s nothing compared to the thousands of used and recycled corks needed by Grand Rapids-based illustrator and artist Scott Gundersen to complete his large scale portraits. Starting with a large photograph that’s transferred to a drawing, Gundersen pins each cork to the canvas, creating a correlation between the hues of the wine-stained corks and the value of light or shadow in the portrait. His latest work, Trisha, took 3,621 corks to complete, but other works have required over 9,000. Watch the timelapse videos above to see how he does it. And can I add, what I wouldn’t give to have a completely idyllic barn studio. Such a beautiful space.

 

 



Art

Wine Stain Portraits by Amelia Fais Harnas

June 13, 2012

Christopher Jobson

I first covered the work of Amelia Fais Harnas last year when she had just begun experimenting with a series of portraits involving wine stains and embroidery. Harnas has spent the last few months perfecting the technique and now has some two dozen works on display. Via her website:

A portrait artist at heart, I am particularly intrigued by the challenge of trying to control the unpredictable nature of wine bleeding through fabric in order to channel the equally imprecise nature of a person’s character. In addition, the sacred aspect of wine lends itself to religious iconography, reminding many of the Shroud of Turin: one who drinks wine may come to feel a certain level of saintliness sipping on this liquid form of divinity. So, this is a form of consecration.

I’m also fascinated by the aspect of control in how she forces the wine to create line and tones, it would be great to see a video of the process.

 

 



Illustration

Embroidered Wine Stains

September 22, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Amelia Harnas creates these delicate portraits using a combination of embroidery and wine stains. Via her website:

These portraits are created either by using a wax resist (much like batiks) and repeated wine stains with embroidery as a reinforcing drawing over the original design or wine on paper with machine sewing. These are my first experiments using wine, and I am excited to continue expanding upon these first results.

It’s amazing to see the amount of control she has using the liquid, as is especially noticeable in the first piece. See several more pieces in her wine stain series here. Big thanks to Zum Zum for submitting this!

 

 



Design Illustration

Hamilton Fray Wine Packaging

November 10, 2010

Christopher Jobson

Birds on wine labels? I’ll take a case. Great packaging for Hamilton Fray by Motto. Each wine type is represented by a bird that lives natively on the property of the vineyard. Ah, with notes of blueberry, chocolate, and finch. (via lovely package)

 

 

A Colossal

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Brick Man