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Design

Engraved Wood and Resin Tables Glow With Maps of International Cities

July 16, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Warsaw-based company Woo Design engraves aerial views of major international cities like New York, Paris, London, and Munich into wooden coffee tables left raw or filled with resin. The designs are built with three layers to give a complete view of each city, with specific segments that reveal its streets, building tops, and waterways. In several of the company’s designs the resin embedded in the table glows a bright blue or green, adding a luminous element to the table’s surface. Woo Design’s tables are currently available through their website and Etsy. You can follow along for more updated cities and designs on their Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

  

 

 



Art Craft

New Miniature Lace Scenes by Ágnes Herczeg Capture Quiet Domestic Moments

July 11, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Hungarian fiber artist Ágnes Herczeg (previously) continues to create delicate depictions of quiet moments. Formed from colorful lace and found wood, each small scene floats in mid-air and is attached to a piece of wood. Whereas in previous work, Herczeg used unusually shaped wood fragments as part of the figural elements of the scenes, in her more recent pieces the wood acts as a frame. You can see more of the artist’s work on her website and Instagram.

 

 



Art

Gnarled Eyes and Knotted Ears Emerge from Sculptural Portraits Made With Found Wood

June 27, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Artist Bennett Ewing travels the world collecting pieces of wood from mountains, deserts, beaches, and forests to form expressive sculptural portraits. Using the natural shapes and tones of his found wooden materials, Ewing, who goes by the artist name Eyevan Tumbleweed, builds evocative facial features and wild hairstyles. The artist states, “the sylvan entities and their expressions of thought and emotion portray a glimpse of an otherworldly realm that is not altogether unfamiliar.” You can see more of Ewing’s artwork on his website and Instagram. (via Supersonic Art)

 

 



Art

Glass Beaded Sculptures by Valérie Rey Bring a Luminous New Dimension to Discarded Wood

June 18, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"Gelée Royale" (2017), Wood and glass, 16 x 11 x 15 inches

“Gelée Royale” (2017), Wood and glass, 16 x 11 x 15 inches

Costa Rica-based artist Valérie Rey combines fallen segments of branches and logs with glass beads to bring a luminous new life to found natural forms. Innumerable glass baubles in colors of orange, gold, green, and black either completely encrust the found material or are sprinkled over its exterior, imitating a natural appearance similar to a cracked geode. ​You can see more of her nature-inspired sculptures on her website and Instagram.

Detail of "Gelée Royale" (2017), Wood and glass, 16 x 11 x 15 inches

Detail of “Gelée Royale” (2017), Wood and glass, 16 x 11 x 15 inches

"Effervescence" (2016), Wood and glass, 14 x 12 x 9 inches

“Effervescence” (2016), Wood and glass, 14 x 12 x 9 inches

Cervelle de Moineau (2017), Glass, 13 x 7 x 7 inches

“Supernova”

“In The Sky With Diamonds” (2017), Wood and glass, 6 x 6 x 14 inches

“Après la Pluie”

Detail of “Après la Pluie”

“Angel Virus” (2015), Wood and glass, : 18 x 9 x 9 inches

"Black Rainbow" (2017), Wood and glass, 8 x 8 x 5 inches

“Black Rainbow” (2017), Wood and glass, 8 x 8 x 5 inches

“E2” (2017), Wood and glass, 7 x 7 x 7 inches

 

 



Art

A Towering Wooden Sculpture by Daniel Popper Welcomes Beachgoers in Tulum

June 13, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

South African artist Daniel Popper, known for his massive figurative sculptures, has constructed a new artwork as part of an arts and culture festival in Tulum, Mexico. The towering installation is titled Ven a la Luz (come into the light), and is comprised of wood and rope formed into a female figure. Her torso is filled with lush green plants, which creates an archway for viewers to walk through.

Ven a La luz will be permanently installed at the resort Ahau Tulum now that the inaugural festival, Art With Me, has concluded. As Tulum’s popularity for vacationing has exploded over the last several years, development and cultural investment has dramatically increased in the area. Recently, a member of the famed Guggenheim family built an art gallery using a similar rustic, curvilinear style to Popper’s festival-friendly sculpture. You can see more of Popper’s large-scale sculptures on his website and Instagram. (via Street Art News)

 

 



Art

Impractical Wooden Furniture Created to Blend Into its Natural Environment

May 31, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"The Jones: Part 2" (2017), sculpted fallen trees from Manhattan, 66 x 72 x 48 inches

“The Jones: Part 2” (2017), sculpted fallen trees from Manhattan, 66 x 72 x 48 inches

Hugh Hayden builds furniture not intended for human use, crafting benches and chairs from pieces of wood without removing the original branches or twigs. In these sculptural works the stray forms make it nearly impossible to use the object as a piece of furniture. The shape an Adirondack chair is present, like in his piece The Jones and Other Borrowed Ideas, yet its impediments make sitting an uncomfortable challenge.

Hayden’s imbedded branches serve as a camouflage system that explores how his designed objects might blend into a natural landscape. His piece “Brier Patch,” which features six carved school desks, “juxtaposes the organic, unpredictability of the natural world (e.g. undergrowth,
a thicket etc.) with the ordered and disciplined pursuit of education and greater civilization,” he explains. “The branches extending from the desks are entangled and materialize this integration into the landscape or environment, creating a visible, unifying space, that is at once protective and impenetrable.”

His solo exhibition at White Columns runs through June 2, 2018, and is his first in New York City. Hayden recently received is MFA in Sculpture from Columbia University, and his Bachelor of Architecture from Cornell University in 2007. You can see more of his sculptures on his website and Instagram.

"The Jones: Part 2" (2017), sculpted fallen trees from Manhattan, 66 x 72 x 48 inches

“The Jones: Part 2” (2017), sculpted fallen trees from Manhattan, 66 x 72 x 48 inches

"Brier Patch" (2018), sculpted wood and hardware, dimensions variable

“Brier Patch” (2018), sculpted wood and hardware, dimensions variable

Detail of "Brier Patch" (2018), sculpted wood and hardware, dimensions variable

Detail of “Brier Patch” (2018), sculpted wood and hardware, dimensions variable

Detail of "Brier Patch" (2018), sculpted wood and hardware, dimensions variable

Detail of “Brier Patch” (2018), sculpted wood and hardware, dimensions variable

"Hangers" (2018), sculpted wood and garment rack, 60 x 66 x 30 inches

“Hangers” (2018), sculpted wood and garment rack, 60 x 66 x 30 inches

Detail of "Hangers" (2018), sculpted wood and garment rack, 60 x 66 x 30 inches

Detail of “Hangers” (2018), sculpted wood and garment rack, 60 x 66 x 30 inches

Detail of "Hangers" (2018), sculpted wood and garment rack, 60 x 66 x 30 inches

Detail of “Hangers” (2018), sculpted wood and garment rack, 60 x 66 x 30 inches

"The Jones and Other Borrowed Ideas" (2017), sculpted fallen hemlock, 40 x 48 x 53 inches

“The Jones and Other Borrowed Ideas” (2017), sculpted fallen hemlock, 40 x 48 x 53 inches

"Untitled Lexus Dash" (2017), sculpted wood from Harlem park, 60 x 48 x 42 inches

“Untitled Lexus Dash” (2017), sculpted wood from Harlem park, 60 x 48 x 42 inches

 

 



Art

A Skeletal Wooden Kraken Climbs From Remote Ruins in France

May 30, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

French artist Thomas Voillaume, a.k.a. APACH, likes to mix his background in sculpture and video to 3D map digital works onto larger-than-life public sculptures in urban environments. For his 2016 sculpture The Kraken however, the artist decided to construct the work with a more minimal approach. The piece is an open wooden structure built into the ruins of Val d’Escrein, a remote valley in Hautes-Alpes, France. Its body is situated at the center of the stone building, while its six pointed legs reach over the crumbling walls.

Voillaume’s work is one of three monumental installations scattered throughout the region, including eleven illuminated dandelion sculptures formed from clusters of milk bottles by Alice and David Bertizzolo and a giant wooden hand by Pedro Marzorati. You can take a look at more of Voillaume’s work on his website and Instagram, and view a behind-the-scenes video of The Kraken’s construction (with horses!) in the video below. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 

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