Tag Archives: wood

Stop-Motion Animation of Wood Cut Millimeter by Millimeter Creates Waves that Ripple Like Water

Stop Motion Animation of Wood Cut Millimeter by Millimeter Creates Waves that Ripple Like Water wood video art trees stop motion animation

Waves of Grain is a two minute strata-cut animation by filmmaker Keith Skretch who planed a block of wood in tiny increments and took photographs along the way. The final video reveals a strange sense of motion as the camera moves effortlessly through the block revealing the the sinuous curves of wood grain that appears to ripple like water. If you liked this also check out these fruit and vegetable MRIs from Andy Ellison. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Table Topography: Wood Furniture Embedded with Glass Rivers and Lakes by Greg Klassen

Table Topography: Wood Furniture Embedded with Glass Rivers and Lakes by Greg Klassen wood table rivers lakes furniture

Table Topography: Wood Furniture Embedded with Glass Rivers and Lakes by Greg Klassen wood table rivers lakes furniture

Table Topography: Wood Furniture Embedded with Glass Rivers and Lakes by Greg Klassen wood table rivers lakes furniture

Table Topography: Wood Furniture Embedded with Glass Rivers and Lakes by Greg Klassen wood table rivers lakes furniture

Table Topography: Wood Furniture Embedded with Glass Rivers and Lakes by Greg Klassen wood table rivers lakes furniture

Table Topography: Wood Furniture Embedded with Glass Rivers and Lakes by Greg Klassen wood table rivers lakes furniture

Table Topography: Wood Furniture Embedded with Glass Rivers and Lakes by Greg Klassen wood table rivers lakes furniture

Table Topography: Wood Furniture Embedded with Glass Rivers and Lakes by Greg Klassen wood table rivers lakes furniture

Table Topography: Wood Furniture Embedded with Glass Rivers and Lakes by Greg Klassen wood table rivers lakes furniture

Table Topography: Wood Furniture Embedded with Glass Rivers and Lakes by Greg Klassen wood table rivers lakes furniture

Furniture maker Greg Klassen builds intricately designed tables and other objects embedded with glass rivers and lakes. Inspired by his surroundings in the Pacific Northwest, Klassen works with edge pieces from discarded trees (often acquired from construction sites, or from dying trees that have begun to rot) which he aligns to mimic the jagged shores of various bodies of water. The pieces are completed with the addition of hand-cut glass pieces that appear to meander through the middle of each table. You can see much more of work here, and several tables are available through his shop.

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The Fine Art of Japanese Parquetry Using Razor-Thin Slices of Wood Mosaics

The Fine Art of Japanese Parquetry Using Razor Thin Slices of Wood Mosaics wood parquetry mosaics

From 2012-2013 Gucci Japan produced an online video series called “Hand” that payed homage to 35 artists and designers who eschew modern mass-production in favor of traditional techniques. One of the most impressive videos is an example of Japanese parquetry demonstrated by Noboru Honma, where geometric mosaics of wood are cut into razor-thin veneers for application on boxes or other decorative objects.

According to Jesus Diaz over at Gizmodo, when viewed with headphones and at full-screen, this video may be an example of autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR), a perceptual phenomenon that’s described on Wikipedia as “a distinct, pleasurable tingling sensation in the head, scalp, back, or peripheral regions of the body in response to visual, auditory, tactile, olfactory, and/or cognitive stimuli.” So, what’s the verdict, does this Japanese parquetry make your spine tingle!? Or maybe this calligraphy video? Or what about competitive wood planing? Anything? (via Spoon & Tamago, Sploid)

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Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika

Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika wood pencils multiples

Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika wood pencils multiples

Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika wood pencils multiples

Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika wood pencils multiples

Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika wood pencils multiples

Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika wood pencils multiples

Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika wood pencils multiples

Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika wood pencils multiples

Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika wood pencils multiples

Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika wood pencils multiples

Vases Constructed from Hundreds of Pencils by Studio Markunpoika wood pencils multiples

Amalgamated is a new series of vessels by studio markunpoika constructed from assembled pencils. Taking advantage of the pencil’s unique hexagon shape, the pencils are first tightly glued together at each facet to form a solid block. The final pieces are then carved on a machine lathe to reveal the insides of each pencil. Via studio markunpoika:

“Amalgamated” is a collection which explores the relationship of a mass produced ‘tool’ and its individual purpose. The beauty of the pencil as an object seems to go unnoticed if utilised only for their primary purpose. “Amalgamated” is a visual and tactile investigation by using pencils as a raw material. This holistic principle has been the fundament for creating this set of vases; let the pencils become a thing themselves.

The vessels are part of a collaboration between Gallery FUMI and Faber-Castell and were recently on view as part of Design Miami/Basel 2014. (via designboom)

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Artist Ryousuke Ohtake Carves Incredibly Realistic Lobster from Boxwood

Artist Ryousuke Ohtake Carves Incredibly Realistic Lobster from Boxwood wood sculpture lobsters carving

Artist Ryousuke Ohtake Carves Incredibly Realistic Lobster from Boxwood wood sculpture lobsters carving

Artist Ryousuke Ohtake Carves Incredibly Realistic Lobster from Boxwood wood sculpture lobsters carving

Artist Ryousuke Ohtake Carves Incredibly Realistic Lobster from Boxwood wood sculpture lobsters carving

Artist Ryousuke Ohtake Carves Incredibly Realistic Lobster from Boxwood wood sculpture lobsters carving

Artist Ryousuke Ohtake Carves Incredibly Realistic Lobster from Boxwood wood sculpture lobsters carving

Artist Ryousuke Ohtake Carves Incredibly Realistic Lobster from Boxwood wood sculpture lobsters carving

Within the vast arena of Japanese sculpture there’s a small niche category known as jizai okimono. The craft involves carving realistic animals whose bodies and limbs are all animated through joints just like the real living thing. Some common subjects are birds, fishes, snakes and insects. It’s a craft that originated in the late-Edo period (late 1700s) when metalsmiths and armor makers, faced with a decline in demand for armor, found themselves with plenty of time on their hands. But ever since it’s modest beginnings, the lobster, with its numerous joints and undulating back, has been considered to be the most difficult and challenging subject.

Ryosuke Ohtake, a young 25-year old sculptor, caused quite a stir recently when he boldly took on the challenge and created an immaculate and animated lobster from wood. What stunned many was that not only was the piece carved from wood (which is considered far more difficult than using copper) but the fact that this was Ohtake’s first official jizai okimono. The lobster was part of a wooden sculpture exhibition at Tokyu Department Store in Tokyo this April. Watch the video to see exactly how realistic this lobster moves. And you can see more of his work over on his Facebook page.

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Artist Henrique Oliveira Constructs a Cavernous Network of Repurposed Wood Tunnels at MAC USP

Artist Henrique Oliveira Constructs a Cavernous Network of Repurposed Wood Tunnels at MAC USP wood installation architecture

Artist Henrique Oliveira Constructs a Cavernous Network of Repurposed Wood Tunnels at MAC USP wood installation architecture

Artist Henrique Oliveira Constructs a Cavernous Network of Repurposed Wood Tunnels at MAC USP wood installation architecture

Artist Henrique Oliveira Constructs a Cavernous Network of Repurposed Wood Tunnels at MAC USP wood installation architecture

Artist Henrique Oliveira Constructs a Cavernous Network of Repurposed Wood Tunnels at MAC USP wood installation architecture

Artist Henrique Oliveira Constructs a Cavernous Network of Repurposed Wood Tunnels at MAC USP wood installation architecture

Artist Henrique Oliveira Constructs a Cavernous Network of Repurposed Wood Tunnels at MAC USP wood installation architecture

Artist Henrique Oliveira Constructs a Cavernous Network of Repurposed Wood Tunnels at MAC USP wood installation architecture

Artist Henrique Oliveira Constructs a Cavernous Network of Repurposed Wood Tunnels at MAC USP wood installation architecture

Artist Henrique Oliveira Constructs a Cavernous Network of Repurposed Wood Tunnels at MAC USP wood installation architecture

Artist Henrique Oliveira Constructs a Cavernous Network of Repurposed Wood Tunnels at MAC USP wood installation architecture

Brazilian artist Henrique Oliveira (previously) recently completed work on his largest installation to date titled Transarquitetônica at Museu de Arte Contemporânea da Universidade in São Paulo. As with much of his earlier sculptural and installation work the enormous piece is built from tapumes, a kind of temporary siding made from inexpensive wood that is commonly used to obscure construction sites. Oliveira uses the repurposed wood pieces as a skin nailed to an organic framework that looks intentionally like a large root system. Because the space provided by the museum was so immense, the artist expanded the installation into a fully immersive environment where viewers are welcome to enter the artwork and explore the cavernous interior. Transarquitetônica will be on view through the end of November this year, and you can watch the video above by Crane TV to hear Oliveira discuss its creation.

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This 45-Piece Wooden Sushi Set Will Make Kids Dream of Sushi

This 45 Piece Wooden Sushi Set Will Make Kids Dream of Sushi wood sushi kids food

This 45 Piece Wooden Sushi Set Will Make Kids Dream of Sushi wood sushi kids food

There are many wooden sushi sets out there for kids but this one, created by Japanese design firm plaplax, takes the cake. Or more appropriately, the fish. It consists of 45 wooden pieces that help teach kids about shari (the bite-sized vinegar rice) and neta (the fish topping). Kids can rearrange the shari and neta to create their own culinary masterpiece. The set was originally created for a kid-friendly exhibition last year, but you can now buy your very own “tsumiki sushi”. They’re going for 7,400 yen a pop and if you order before July 2014 your meal will ship in August. (syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

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