Tag Archives: wood

Chuck: A Flexible Wooden Bookshelf

Chuck: A Flexible Wooden Bookshelf wood furniture bookshelf books

Chuck: A Flexible Wooden Bookshelf wood furniture bookshelf books

Chuck: A Flexible Wooden Bookshelf wood furniture bookshelf books

Chuck: A Flexible Wooden Bookshelf wood furniture bookshelf books

Chuck: A Flexible Wooden Bookshelf wood furniture bookshelf books

Chuck is an awesome shelving concept by German designer Natascha Harra-Frischkorn. The flexible shelving unit is made from six 4mm thick planks of wood that can be adjusted to hold small collections of books and other objects in a beautiful organic shape. Really wish this was actually a thing. (via soft shock)

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New Skeletons and Insects Carved from Common Inanimate Objects by Maskull Lasserre

New Skeletons and Insects Carved from Common Inanimate Objects by Maskull Lasserre wood sculpture animals anatomy

New Skeletons and Insects Carved from Common Inanimate Objects by Maskull Lasserre wood sculpture animals anatomy

New Skeletons and Insects Carved from Common Inanimate Objects by Maskull Lasserre wood sculpture animals anatomy

New Skeletons and Insects Carved from Common Inanimate Objects by Maskull Lasserre wood sculpture animals anatomy

New Skeletons and Insects Carved from Common Inanimate Objects by Maskull Lasserre wood sculpture animals anatomy

New Skeletons and Insects Carved from Common Inanimate Objects by Maskull Lasserre wood sculpture animals anatomy

New Skeletons and Insects Carved from Common Inanimate Objects by Maskull Lasserre wood sculpture animals anatomy

New Skeletons and Insects Carved from Common Inanimate Objects by Maskull Lasserre wood sculpture animals anatomy

New Skeletons and Insects Carved from Common Inanimate Objects by Maskull Lasserre wood sculpture animals anatomy

New Skeletons and Insects Carved from Common Inanimate Objects by Maskull Lasserre wood sculpture animals anatomy

New Skeletons and Insects Carved from Common Inanimate Objects by Maskull Lasserre wood sculpture animals anatomy

New Skeletons and Insects Carved from Common Inanimate Objects by Maskull Lasserre wood sculpture animals anatomy

Montreal-based artist Maskull Lasserre (previously) recently completed a new body of work for an exhibition titled Fable at Centre Space gallery in Toronto that ran through January 19th. Lasserre is known for his incredible ability to carve anatomical forms of animals, people, insects and other forms out of inanimate objects such as doors, tables, pianos, and even instruments. In a two part interview with Liana Voia (part 1, part 2) the artist discusses the intent behind his work:

When the remnants of life are imposed on an object, and that’s true especially with the carving work that I do, it infers a past history or a previous life that had been lived, so again where people see my work as macabre, I often see it as hopeful, as the remnants of a life. Despite the fact that the life has ended, at least that life had a beginning and middle as well, so often by imparting these bodily elements to inanimate objects it reclaims or reanimates them in a virtual way.

The objects in Fable included a crow skeleton carved into a chair and axe, a vulture skull carved into two hand planes, a human ear carved into a violin and case, a rat carved into a door and rolling pin, and an incredible rhinoceros beetle taking flight from within an upright piano. You can learn more over on Center Space.

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Sketching with a Band Saw: James McNabb’s Scrap Wood Cityscapes

Sketching with a Band Saw: James McNabbs Scrap Wood Cityscapes wood sculpture architecture

Sketching with a Band Saw: James McNabbs Scrap Wood Cityscapes wood sculpture architecture

Sketching with a Band Saw: James McNabbs Scrap Wood Cityscapes wood sculpture architecture

Sketching with a Band Saw: James McNabbs Scrap Wood Cityscapes wood sculpture architecture

Sketching with a Band Saw: James McNabbs Scrap Wood Cityscapes wood sculpture architecture

Sketching with a Band Saw: James McNabbs Scrap Wood Cityscapes wood sculpture architecture

Sketching with a Band Saw: James McNabbs Scrap Wood Cityscapes wood sculpture architecture

Sketching with a Band Saw: James McNabbs Scrap Wood Cityscapes wood sculpture architecture

For his MFA Thesis Exhibit last September, Pennsylvania artist James McNabb created a beautiful collection of architectural wonders using discarded wood. He describes his process as “sketching with a band saw,” and says initial intent was not to build skylines, but instead began with the creation of the individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day they collectively began to resemble a miniature city. You can see many more works from the exhibition on his website.

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A Wooden Domino Tree by Qiu Zhijie

A Wooden Domino Tree by Qiu Zhijie wood trees math installation dominoes

A Wooden Domino Tree by Qiu Zhijie wood trees math installation dominoes

A Wooden Domino Tree by Qiu Zhijie wood trees math installation dominoes

A Wooden Domino Tree by Qiu Zhijie wood trees math installation dominoes

The Small Knocking Down the Big is a 2009 installation by Chinese artist Qiu Zhijie made from hundreds of cut wooden dominoes meant to loosely demonstrate the effects of something that has become known as Domino Magnification (if you really, really enjoy physics see the recent work of J. M. J. van Leeuwen). The basic premise is that any domino can knock over another domino that’s roughly 1.5 times larger, meaning that if you gently pushed a normal sized domino into a chain of bricks that increase in size each time by 1.5, the 32nd object will be large enough to topple the Empire State Building. In the video example above it takes only 13 dominoes starting with an object the size of a bean to knock over a 100 lb. slab!

Zhijie’s installation is somewhat less mathematical and more visual, but the same mathematical principles hold true. Participants are invited to knock over the smalles dominoes at the outer branches of the installation which eventually gain enough momentum to knock over the thicker blocks at the trunk. (via lustik)

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A Skull Made from Repurposed Skateboard Decks by Haroshi

A Skull Made from Repurposed Skateboard Decks by Haroshi wood skulls sculpture anatomy

A Skull Made from Repurposed Skateboard Decks by Haroshi wood skulls sculpture anatomy

This incredibly detailed skull made from repurposed skateboard decks is one of several new artworks from self-taught Japanese artist Haroshi (previously) who will be opening his second solo show at Jonathan Levine Gallery in New York on January 12. Don’t miss it.

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Explore the Underwater Topography of North American Lakes with these Laser-Cut Wood Maps by ‘Below the Boat’

Explore the Underwater Topography of North American Lakes with these Laser Cut Wood Maps by Below the Boat wood maps lakes

Explore the Underwater Topography of North American Lakes with these Laser Cut Wood Maps by Below the Boat wood maps lakes

Explore the Underwater Topography of North American Lakes with these Laser Cut Wood Maps by Below the Boat wood maps lakes

Explore the Underwater Topography of North American Lakes with these Laser Cut Wood Maps by Below the Boat wood maps lakes

Explore the Underwater Topography of North American Lakes with these Laser Cut Wood Maps by Below the Boat wood maps lakes

Explore the Underwater Topography of North American Lakes with these Laser Cut Wood Maps by Below the Boat wood maps lakes

Explore the Underwater Topography of North American Lakes with these Laser Cut Wood Maps by Below the Boat wood maps lakes

Explore the Underwater Topography of North American Lakes with these Laser Cut Wood Maps by Below the Boat wood maps lakes

Launched less than a month ago, Below the Boat makes gorgeous bathymetric charts (the underwater equivalent of a topographic map) using laser-cut layers of Baltic birch that are then carefully glued together to create what you see here. They have over two dozens charts currently available organized by East Coast, West Coast, and Interior Lakes. (via gessato)

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A Giant Synthetic Crystal Explodes Through Gallery Floors at the School 33 Art Center in Baltimore

A Giant Synthetic Crystal Explodes Through Gallery Floors at the School 33 Art Center in Baltimore wood installation

A Giant Synthetic Crystal Explodes Through Gallery Floors at the School 33 Art Center in Baltimore wood installation

A Giant Synthetic Crystal Explodes Through Gallery Floors at the School 33 Art Center in Baltimore wood installation

A Giant Synthetic Crystal Explodes Through Gallery Floors at the School 33 Art Center in Baltimore wood installation

A Giant Synthetic Crystal Explodes Through Gallery Floors at the School 33 Art Center in Baltimore wood installation

A Giant Synthetic Crystal Explodes Through Gallery Floors at the School 33 Art Center in Baltimore wood installation

A Giant Synthetic Crystal Explodes Through Gallery Floors at the School 33 Art Center in Baltimore wood installation

A Giant Synthetic Crystal Explodes Through Gallery Floors at the School 33 Art Center in Baltimore wood installation

Points of Contention is a 2011 installation by Jonathan Latiano that was installed in a gallery space at the School 33 Art Center in Baltimore. The piece features an explosive crystal growth protruding from a rippling gallery floor that is meant to call into question the continued production of plastics, resins and polymers and their long-term impact on the geological landscape around us. Via a press release for the exhibition:

Driven by the exploration of time, motion and the physics of the natural world, Jonathan Latiano presents Points of Contention, a site-specific installation sculpture that investigates the increasingly blurred line between the organic and inorganic as well as the spatial boundaries of where the spectacle begins and ends. Convergent forms of crystalline growth and explosive impact reinforce the hundreds of shards of custom cut and painted elements used to create the centerpiece of the exhibition. Through the use of reclaimed and altered wood, plastic, Styrofoam and site-grown salt crystals Latiano explores the question: At what point do the controversies of the present become the “new norms” of the future?

Latiano will return to School 33 Art Center in September of 2013 as part of a collaboration with artist Jennifer Strunge who is known for her creation of totally bizarre and wonderful cotton monsters. Can’t wait to see what the two do together!

If you liked this piece, also check out the work of Chris Whiteburch, and the Inversion House by Dan Havel and Dean Ruck. (via razorshapes)

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