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Art

A New Large-Scale Installation of Boats and Tangled Thread by Artist Chiharu Shiota

January 20, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

All images, “Where are we going?” Installation by Chiharu Shiota at Le Bon Marché Rive Gauche, copyright Gabriel de la Chapelle

The newest installation by Chiharu Shiota (previously here and here) is composed of nearly 300,000 yards of white yarn, woven to encapsulate the center, ground floor, and ten windows of Le Bon Marché. The exhibition, titled Where are we going?, will feature 150 boats within the French department store’s center, and the ground-floor exhibition will house a giant threaded wave that visitors are encouraged to walk through. Despite boats being a common theme in Shiota’s work, this installation will mark the first time she has used white yarn, previously creating installations with only black or red thread.

The title of the exhibition, Where are we going?, refers to the mysterious destinations that pinpoint each of our individual and collective lives. Therefore the boats in this installation represent vessels sailing towards unknown locations, the works expressing both a sense of poetry and a sense of unease over what is to come.

“I am struck by the multiplicity of interactions that we experience every day, by their connections with the past and the future,” said Shiota in an interview with Le Bon Marché. “The creation of this indecipherable mesh and its plasticity are a mystery, just like our brain, the universe, and of course, life. I have no answers, only questions. These questions are the foundations of my work.”

Last year Le Bon Marché organized a large exhibition of Ai WeiWei's work which featured a 65-foot bamboo and silk dragon in the store’s atrium. Shiota’s Where are we going? will be displayed at Le Bon Marché through February 18, 2017. (via Fubiz)

 

 



Art

Uncertain Journey: A Flotilla of Wireframe Boats Overflow With a Dense Canopy of Red Yarn

September 15, 2016

Christopher Jobson

chiharu-shiota-uncertain-journey-2016-installation-view-courtesy-the-artist-and-blainsouthern-photo-christian-glaeser

Chiharu Shiota, Uncertain Journey, 2016, Installation view, Courtesy the artist and Blain|Southern, All photos by Christian Glaeser.

For her latest installation at Blain|Southern in Berlin, artist Chiharu Shiota has constructed a twisted network of tangled red yarn that rises from a collection of skeletal boats. Titled Uncertain Journey, the artwork envelopes the viewer by creating a blood-red canopy reminiscent of a neural network that meanders in every direction. The piece is a continuation of Shiota’s work with yarn, most notably her 2015 installation The Key in the Hand for the 56th Venice Art Biennale. Uncertain Journey will be on view starting September 17 through November 12, 2016. (via Designboom)

chiharu-shiota-uncertain-journey-2016-installation-view-courtesy-the-artist-and-blainsouthern-photo-christian-glaeser

chiharu-shiota-uncertain-journey-2016-installation-view-courtesy-the-artist-and-blainsouthern-photo-christian-glaeser

chiharu-shiota-uncertain-journey-2016-installation-view-courtesy-the-artist-and-blainsouthern-photo-christian-glaeser

chiharu-shiota-uncertain-journey-2016-installation-view-courtesy-the-artist-and-blainsouthern-photo-christian-glaeser

 

 



Art Photography

A Photographic Celebration of America’s Vibrant Textile Industry by Christopher Payne

December 31, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

S&D Spinning Mill, Millbury, Massachusetts

S&D Spinning Mill, Millbury, Massachusetts

Typically focusing on obsolete or decrepit architectural structures, photographer Chris Payne's most recent project, Textiles, documents the aesthetics of the colorfully-hued American textile industry. His photographs showcase the bright runs of yarn and thread as the materials makes their way through the hyper-organized machinery, appearing digitally altered in their extreme hot pinks, vibrant reds, and electric blues.

Payne began photographing the factories and mills in America’s Northeast in 2010. The images are not just snapshots of the industry, but photographs that sometimes took months to catch. Due to the machinery’s continuous run and his inability to halt production, Payne had to wait until the perfect moment when the right color would appear, or the parts of the machinery would perfectly align. Payne also features the workers within his documentation of the diminishing domestic industry, explaining that their inclusion is proof that labor and craftsmanship is still valued in our current economy.

“Over the past five years, I have gained access to an industry that continues to thrive, albeit on a much smaller scale, and for the most part, out of public view,” said Payne. “Many mills are doing quite well, having modernized to stay competitive, while others have survived by catering to niche markets that value the ‘genuine article’ produced on the original, vintage equipment. I view my work as a celebration of American manufacturing—not a eulogy.

Trained as an architect, Payne typically shoots architectural structures using large format documentation to capture America’s industrial landscape. Past projects have included exploring America’s asylums and an uninhabited island named North Brother Island in New York City’s East River. Payne’s Asylum series will appear at Benrubi Gallery February 11, 2016 and run through March 26, 2016. (via Huffington Post)

Bartlettyarns, Harmony, Maine

Bartlettyarns, Harmony, Maine

S&D Spinning Mill, Millbury, Massachusetts

S&D Spinning Mill, Millbury, Massachusetts

Fall River Knitting Mills, Fall River, Massachusetts

Fall River Knitting Mills, Fall River, Massachusetts

Polartec, Lawrence, Massachusetts

Polartec, Lawrence, Massachusetts

Polartec, Lawrence, Massachusetts

Polartec, Lawrence, Massachusetts

Langhorne Carpet, Penndel, Pennsylvania

Langhorne Carpet, Penndel, Pennsylvania

Conrad-Jarvis, Pawtucket, Rhode Island

Conrad-Jarvis, Pawtucket, Rhode Island

 

Bloomsburg Carpet, Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania

Bloomsburg Carpet, Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania

Darn Tough Socks, Cabot Hosiery Mills, Northfield, Vermont

Darn Tough Socks, Cabot Hosiery Mills, Northfield, Vermont

S&D Spinning Mill, Millbury, Massachusetts

S&D Spinning Mill, Millbury, Massachusetts

 

 



Art Craft

Jay Mohler Updates the Traditional Craft of Homespun God’s Eyes to Create Elaborate Masterpieces up to 48 Inches Wide

July 23, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

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Far more than just popsicle sticks and yarn, Jay Mohler‘s Ojos de Dios or “God’s Eye” mandalas update the craft often seen at sleepaway camps and elementary classrooms. Upwards of 15 colors of yarn are included in his elaborate mandalas, producing pieces that span up to 48 inches in diameter.

Mohler has been crafting Ojos de Dios since 1966, inspired by both Huichol natives of Mexico, and monks from Tibet. The Asheville, North Carolina-based artist began making 8-sided pieces when they grew in popularity as folk art in the 1970’s American Southwest, selling them at tourist gift shops around Albuquerque, New Mexico. Most recently Mohler has been producing 12-sided works that he recognizes as potentially spiritual objects, but explains, “I create these for artistic satisfaction rather than as any sort of spiritual talisman.”

Not only does Mohler sell his own elaborate pieces, but he also creates DIY kits for fans to make their own work. You can buy both his finished pieces and kits on his Etsy page and find detailed instructions for making your own mandalas here. (via The Jealous Curator)

4-up-eyes

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Animation Music

Moving On: A Stop-motion Music Video for ‘James’ Made with Yarn by Ainslie Henderson

May 16, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Moving On is the latest stop-motion video from BAFTA-nominated animator, writer, and director Ainslie Henderson. The clip was created as a music video for British rock band James and tells a story of life and death through characters depicted with yellow yarn. Sad, but wonderfully done. (via Jason Sondhi)

 

 



Art

Optimist: Artist HOTTEA Uses Miles of Yarn to Create a Field of Color Over a Neglected Tennis Court

January 8, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Sean Dorgan

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Sean Dorgan

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Sean Dorgan

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Sean Dorgan

I’m thrilled to announce that Colossal has teamed up with our friends over at Threadless to create a new series of artist profiles called Paid in Full. The premise is simple: we find amazing artists and commission a new project of their choosing and film everything for you to see. Our only goal is to promote the creation of new art and to tell the stories of our favorite creatives working today.

For this first installment we approached Minneapolis artist Eric Rieger aka HoTTea (previously) who works with miles and miles of yarn to create non-destructive street art installations. For Paid in Full he transformed this neglected tennis court into a giant translucent rainbow-like structure. Watch the video above to see it all come together and learn more about HoTTea.

Last week I learned the city and local community in Minneapolis enjoyed the piece so much that for the first time they began locking the tennis court at night to protect the artwork. So great! A huge thanks to Sean Dorgan, Craig Shimala, and Collin Diederich for putting this all together.