Monthly Archives: January 2014

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Art Photography

Back to Light: Artist Caleb Charland Uses Fruit Batteries to Illuminate Long-Exposure Photographs

January 27, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Fruit Battery Solar System, 2014

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Battery with Hanging Apples, 2013

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Limes and Lemons, 2013

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Electricity From a Ring of Apples, 2013

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Vinegar Batteries with Glassware and Shelf, 2013

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Grapefruit and Pomelo Battery, 2013

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Apple Lamp, 2014

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Apple Tree with Chandelier, Nettie Fox Farm, Newburgh, Maine 2013

Artist Caleb Charland (previously here and here) just unveiled several new images from his Back to Light series, where the artist uses nails inside fruit connected with copper wire to create functional batteries. Harnessed to a small lightbulb, the current is sufficient enough to provide illumination for long exposure photographs. Effectively, the organic batteries create enough voltage to light their own portrait. Charland says about Back to Light:

My current body of work, Back to Light, expands upon a classic grade school science project, the potato battery. By inserting a galvanized nail into one side of a potato and a copper wire in the other side a small electrical current is generated. The utter simplicity of this electrical phenomenon is endlessly fascinating for me. Many people have had the experience of drawing power from fruit in the classroom, and it never ceases to bring a smile to the face or a thought to the mind. This work speaks to a common curiosity we all have for how the world works as well as a global concern for the future of earth’s energy sources. […] My hope is that these photographs function as micro utopias by suggesting and illustrating the endless possibilities of alternative and sustainable energy production. The cycle that begins with the light of our closest star implanting organic materials with nutrients and energy, is re-routed in these images, Back to Light, illuminating earth once again.

Charland is currently focusing on his work full-time from a studio in Bangor, Maine, where he created another body of work titled Artifacts of Fire and Wax.

 

 



Photography

Falling Upwards: A Vertigo-Inducing View at King Aragon’s Stairs in France

January 27, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Photographer Allard Schager shot this perplexing photo while looking up the Stairway of the King of Aragon, a stairwell carved into a steep cliff face in Bonifacio, Corsica, France. I’ve looked at it carefully half a dozen times and still get confused as to which way is up or down. Totally wild.

 

 



Animation Craft

The Golden Age of Insect Aviation

January 27, 2014

Christopher Jobson

This clip has been making the rounds everywhere lately, and for good reason. Just 10 seconds long and guaranteed to put an instant smile on your face. Created by Wayne Unten. (via The Kid Should See This)

 

 



Art

Found Wood Assembled Into Bas-Relief Sculptures by Ron van der Ende

January 27, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Veneer Theory, 2014. Bas-relief in salvaged wood, 60″ x 61″ x 6″.

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Watershed (Yosemite), 2013. Bas-relief in salvaged wood, 71″ x 79″ x 5″.

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Cross-Section I, 2012. Bas-relief in salvaged wood, 74″ x 44″ x 5″.

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Cross-Section I, detail.

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Airstream R.V., 2012. Bas-relief in salvaged wood, 120″ x 53″ x 5″.

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Airstream R.V., detail.

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Phoenix: Rise! (Pontiac Firebird Trans-Am), 2011. Bas-relief in salvaged wood, 102″ x 37″ x 7″.

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Phoenix: Rise! (Pontiac Firebird Trans-Am), detail.

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Axonometric Array, 2008. Bas-relief in reclaimed timbers, size variable.

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Cold Storage, 2013. Bas-relief in salvaged wood, 76″ x 52″ x 6″.

Working with stacks of found wood, Dutch artist Ron van der Ende assembles gigantic bas-relief sculptures inspired by space, nature, industry, as well as retro technology and vehicles. The original color and texture of each wood fragment is left intact, making each sculpture into a mosaic containing both a new image and the history of its materials. Van der Ende has so finely honed his technique that one might first assume when viewing a sculpture that they are instead paintings. Because of the artworks strong sense of perspective, some viewers have reported feeling dizzy when first encountering one of his sculptures.

You can see much more of the artist’s work on his website and he’ll also be showing work through Ambach & Rice in April at the Dallas Art Fair.

 

 



Design History

This 16th Century Book Can Be Read Six Different Ways

January 24, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Sure, the Amazon Kindle might have dynamic font adjustments, and it can hold thousands of books, but can it do this? Printed in the late 16th century this small book from the National Library of Sweden is an example of sixfold dos-à-dos binding, where six books are conjoined into a single publication but can be read individually with the help of six perfectly placed clasps. This particular book was printed in Germany and like almost all books at the time is a religious devotional text. The National Library of Sweden has a fantastic photo collection of historical and rare books where you can find many more gems like this, and this, and this.

Update: And if you really like amazing old book discoveries, you should be following Erik Kwakkel, the Medieval book historian at Leiden University in the Netherlands, who originally unearthed this story. (via Neatorama)

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Animation

Loving Vincent: The First Feature-Length Painted Animation Will Explore the Life and Death of Vincent Van Gogh

January 23, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Currently in production at Oscar-winning studio BreakThru Films, Loving Vincent will be the first feature-length animated film made solely through hand-painted canvases. The movie will examine the life of post-Impressionist painter Vincent Van Gogh and the circumstances surrounding his violent and mysterious death some 123 years ago. Understandably, the production for Loving Vincent is no easy task and requires the help of 70 (!) painters who will help create the numerous hand-painted oil canvases required to bring the story to life. The team is currently appealing to the public on Kickstarter to help raise funds to complete the movie. (via The Awesomer)

 

 



Photography

Eye of the Spider: Hypnotizing Macro Photos of Exotic Spiders Staring Directly into Your Mind

January 23, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Like hairy aliens from another planet, these tiny spiders seem to stare with giant, all-knowing eyes into your very soul. Whether they possess otherworldly secrets or a desire to attack your face is open to interpretation. Regardless, photographer Jimmy Kong has done an incredible job capturing these intimate moments with diverse arthropods found in his native Malaysia. What you see here is just a taste of his macro work that also involves insects, reptiles and other creepy crawly things. See more on Flickr. (via the Colossal Flickr Pool)