Monthly Archives: January 2014

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Art Photography

Surreal Atmospheric Photography by Martin Vlach

January 22, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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I’m really enjoying these conceptual photographs by Martin Vlach. The artist digitally merges his own photography with elements of nature to create surreal, atmospheric scenes that feel both isolating and mysterious. You can see more on Instagram and Flickr. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

 

 



Art

Geometric Public Space Sculptures by David Mesguich

January 22, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Artist David Mesguich has been creating large geometric sculptures that he installs in locations around Belgium and France, blurring the lines between street art and fine art. The pieces are displayed in public areas and aren’t made to be sold but are instead donated to the city. Of his most recent work, PRESSURE 1.0, he remarks:

The story of “pressure”—it’s the story of people who are on the fence, in between worlds, those who are both on the inside and on the outside. My inspiration came from two sources: a family history that steeped me in a violent, carceral universe during my youth and more than 10 years of trespassing with graffiti.

Mesguich has several other pieces you can see on Behance and on his website.

 

 



Design Food

The Yolkfish: A Yolk-Eating Fish from Peleg Design

January 22, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Created by Tel Aviv-based design firm Peleg Design, the Yolkfish is a clever kitchen tool designed like a fish that slurps up yolks as means to separate them from egg whites. The yolks can then be deposited elsewhere with a gentle squeeze. See it in action in the video. If you liked this also check out their awesome kitchen elephant, Jumbo. (via Designboom)

 

 



Art Design

A 1:60-Scale Boeing 777 Built Entirely from Paper Manilla Folders by Luca Iaconi-Stewart

January 21, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Inspired by high school architecture class where he was assigned to create simple paper models using cut paper manilla folders, San Francisco-based designer Luca Iaconi-Stewart went home to begin construction on an extremely ambitious project: a 1:60 scale reproduction of a Boeing 777 using some of the techniques he learned in class. That was in 2008, when Iaconi-Stewart was just a junior in high school.

Unbelievably, the project continues five years later as he works on and off to perfect every aspect of the plane. Relying on detailed schematics of an Air India 777-300ER he found online, he recreates the digital drawings in Adobe Illustrator and then prints them directly onto the paper manilla folders. But everything has to be perfect. So perfect, that Iaconi-Stewart says he’s actually built two airplanes, the one you see here and the numerous failed attempts including three tails, two entire sets of wings, and multiple experiments to ensure everything is just so.

The paper plane-making wunderkind hopes to finally wrap up the project this summer and isn’t quite sure what will happen next, but thinks an even larger 20-foot model could be an interesting next step. So far there are no plans for the completed model to go anywhere, but it would look great in an aeronautical museum or in the lobby of a certain aircraft manufacturer’s lobby. Just some suggestions. All photos courtesy Luca Iaconi-Stewart. (via Wired)

 

 



Art Dance

Emptied Gestures: Physical Movement Translated into Symmetrical Charcoal Drawings by Heather Hansen

January 20, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Photo by Bryan Tarnowski

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Photo by Bryan Tarnowski

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Photo by Bryan Tarnowski

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Photo by Bryan Tarnowski

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Photo by Bryan Tarnowski

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Photo by Bryan Tarnowski

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Photo by Bryan Tarnowski

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Photo by Bryan Tarnowski

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Photo by Spencer Hansen at Ochi Gallery

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Photo by Spencer Hansen at Ochi Gallery

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Photo by Spencer Hansen at Ochi Gallery

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Photo by Spencer Hansen at Ochi Gallery

Splayed across a giant paper canvas with pieces of charcoal firmly grasped in each hand, Heather Hansen begins a grueling physical routine atop a sizeable paper canvas. Her body contorts into carefully choreographed gestures as her writing implements grate across the floor, the long trails resulting in a permanent recording of her physical movements. Part dance and part performance art, the kinetic drawings are a way for Hansen to merge her love for visual art and dance into a unified artform. The final symmetrical patterns that emerge in each pieces are reminiscent of a Rorschach test, or perhaps cycles found in nature.

Hansen most recently had a group exhibition, The Value of a Line, at Ochi Gallery in Ketchum, Idaho which runs through March 31, 2014. All photography above courtesy the artist by Spencer Hansen and Bryan Tarnowski. (via iGNANT, My Modern Met)

 

 



Illustration

New Instagram Photos of Everyday Objects Turned into Whimsical Illustrations by Javier Perez

January 20, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Ecuadorean illustrator and art director Javier Pérez (previously) returns with his second installment of clever Instagram Experiments where he turns everyday objects and food into clever minimalistic photo illustrations. Several of his pieces are available as prints through Society6, and you can follow his new work almost everyday on Instagram as well as on Behance.

 

 



Amazing

Amazing Video Clips Visually Isolate the Flight Paths of Birds

January 20, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Chances are if you’ve on the internet over the last few years you’ve run into a few amazing bird murmuration videos, like this one from Islands and Rivers or the one we featured on Colossal from Neels Castillion, where countless numbers of starlings flock together and move almost impossibly in concert. Artist Dennis Hlynsky, a professor at the Rhode Island School of Design, wondered what would happen if he could better trace the flight paths of individual birds, what kinds of patterns would emerge from these flying social networks?

Hlynsky first started filming birds in 2005 using a small Flip video recorder, but now uses a Lumix GH2 to record gigabytes of bird footage from locations around Rhode Island. He then edits select clips with After Effects and other tools to create brief visual trails that illustrate the path of each moving bird. Non-moving objects like trees and telephone poles remain stationary, and with the added ambient noise of where he was filming, an amazing balance between abstraction and reality emerges. The birds you see aren’t digitally animated or layered in any way, but are shown just as they’ve flown, creating a sort of temporary time-lapse. Above are three of my favorite videos, but he has many more including the movement of insects, ducks, and other animals.