Monthly Archives: January 2014

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Art

Hovering Tree Illusion by Daniel Siering and Mario Shu in Potsdam, Germany

January 2, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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I’m really enjoying this rural intervention (?) created earlier this week by Daniel Siering and Mario Shu in Potsdam, Germany. The duo wrapped a tree in plastic sheeting and then mimicked the background landscape using detailed spray paint strokes to create the illusion of a tree cut in half. It reminds me of this mirror installation by Joakim Kaminsky and Maria Poll. (via Street Art Utopia)

 

 



Art

A Giant Twisting Serpent Skeleton Emerges from the Loire River in France

January 2, 2014

Christopher Jobson

ESTUAIRE 2012 ©Gino Maccarinelli

Kamel Mennour, photo by Gino Maccarinelli

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via Flickr

Completed in 2012, Serpent d’océan is a giant aluminum sea serpent skeleton by artist Huang Yong Ping (previously) situated off the shore of the Loire River where it empties into the Bay of Biscay just outside of Nantes, France. Measuring nearly 425 feet (130 meters) in length the curving skeleton mirrors the curves of the nearby Saint-Nazaire bridge and was created as a permanent work for the final Estuaire contemporary art exhibition in 2012. Via Nantes Tourisme:

By having a major figure from Chinese mythology appear on European shores, Huang Yong Ping examines, the notions of identity and cultural hybridity, as is often the case in his work. The environmental question is also very present in his art where he regularly exposes the paradox of the man sawing the branch he is sitting on, torn between creative abilities and destructive impulses. This is one of the many possible interpretations of this work: placed on the beach, the skeleton appears with the tide and, little by little, will be home to marine fauna and flora.

Depending on weather conditions, tide levels, or the perspective of a photographer, Serpent d’océan appears dramatically different from day to day, a phenomenon you can witness over on Flickr. (via Beautiful Decay)

 

 



Art

Exploring Climate Change through Art: Giant Pastel Oceanscapes and Icebergs Drawn by Zaria Forman

January 2, 2014

Christopher Jobson

Greenland #54 40x60s

Greenland #54 / 40″ x 60″ / Soft pastel on paper.

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Tackling climate change or the documentation of extreme environments can be challenging endeavors for any artist, but for Brooklyn-based Zaria Forman it was simply an extension of a childhood spent traveling with her family to some of the Earth’s most remote locations. For her 2012 project Chasing the Light, Forman led an ambitious art expedition by sailing up the northwest coast of Greenland to retrace the 1869 journey of American painter William Bradford. Along the way she documented the changing arctic landscape which she would use for inspiration in several large soft pastel drawings seen here. Her nearly photorealistic works exquisitely capture the atmosphere and mood of a landscape in flux.

Greenland #56 40x60s

Greenland #56 / 40″ x 60″ / Soft pastel on paper.

Greenland #62 47x70s

Greenland #62 / 47″ x 70″ / Soft pastel on paper.

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Greenland #50 / 40″ x 60″ / Soft pastel on paper.

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Greenland #52 / 55″ x 60″ / Soft pastel on paper.

Greenland #63 50x75s

Greenland #63 / 50″ x 75″ / Soft pastel on paper.

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Maldives #1 40x60s

Maldives #1 / 40″ x 60″ / Soft pastel on paper.

In late 2013, Forman traveled to the Maldives, the lowest-lying country in the world, and an area said to be most vulnerable to rising sea levels, where she completed another body of work focusing on the rising ocean tides. The resulting drawings create an alluring juxtaposition of beauty and menace. Similar journeys have taken the artist to locations around Israel, Nosara, and Svalbard.

Maldives #2 41x60s

Maldives #2 / 41″ x 60″ / Soft pastel on paper.

Maldives #3 30x60s

Maldives #3 / 30″ x 60″ / Soft pastel on paper.

Maldives #4 41x60s

Maldives #4 / 41″ x 60″ / Soft pastel on paper.

Maldives

Maldives #5 / 45″ x 60″ / Soft pastel on paper.

Nosara #1 45x60Gs

Nosara #1 / 45″ x 60″ / Soft pastel on paper.

If you’d like to learn more about Forman’s work she currently has several original works available on Artsy and you can purchase prints over on ArtStar. The artist has an upcoming exhibition at Carla Massoni Gallery that opens in March, and if you have a good eye you can spot 10 of her drawings used on the sets of Netflix’s smash hit House of Cards. You can also follow her on Facebook. (via Gaks Designs)

 

 



Art Photography

Ephemeral Environmental Sculptures Evoke Cycles of Nature

January 1, 2014

Christopher Jobson

Synergy

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Autumn-Leaf-Cycle

Circle Of Circles

Ice Circle

Interwoven World

60994_Kanuka Sphere

60994_Rising Circle

Stone-Circle

Sunrise Circle

For over 20 years environmental artist and photographer Martin Hill has been creating temporary sculptures from ice, stone, and organic materials that reflect nature’s cyclical system. Often working with his longtime partner Philippa Jones, the duo create sculptures and other installations that “metaphorically express concern for the interconnectedness of all living systems.” Speaking specifically about the use of circles Hill shares:

The use of the circle refers to nature’s cyclical system which is now being used as a model for industrial ecology. Sustainability will be achieved by redesigning products and industrial processes as closed loops—materials that can’t safely be returned to nature will be continually turned into new products. Of course this is only one part of the redesign process. We need to use renewable energy, eliminate all poisonous chemicals, use fair trade and create social equity.

You can see much more of Hill’s work in his online gallery, on Flickr, and over on his blog where you can learn about new projects including a major new show titled Watershed for the McClelland Sculpture Park and Gallery that opens in Melbourne in February. (via My Modern Met)

 

 



Design Science

One Step Closer to Hover Boards: Three-Dimensional Mid-Air Acoustic Manipulation

January 1, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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While we’ve seen examples of objects suspended mid-air using quantum levitation and acoustic levitation, a team of three Japanese engineers from The University of Tokyo and the Nagoya Institute of Technology recently unveiled an ambitious device that uses sound waves to move objects through three dimensional space. The machine uses four arrays of speakers to make soundwaves that intersect at a focal point that can be moved up, down, left, and right using external controls. You would think such machine would be extremely loud, but according to one of the engineers the device uses ultrasonic speakers and is almost completely silent. You can read more about it right here. (via Reddit)

 

 



Photography

The Brooding Black and White Photography of Guy Cohen

January 1, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Photography student Guy Cohen lives and studies in Jerusalem, and travels to locations around Israel and elsewhere in the world to capture some of these great images that toy with aspects of light, shadow, and perspective. Although just 24 years old the emerging talent has been shooting for over 8 years and is currently working on a large project involving the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. You can follow his work on Facebook or 500px and prints are available upon request.

 

 

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