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#dirt #installation #rugs

Ephemeral Rugs Formed From Oklahoma’s Red Earth by Rena Detrixhe

March 19, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Oklahoma-based artist Rena Detrixhe creates installations from finely sifted dirt, ephemeral rugs that she stamps with ornate patterns. The dirt used for the works is collected by hand from her surrounding Oklahoma landscape, bringing an important context to the earth-based faux textiles.

“This rich red earth is the land of the dust bowl, the end of the Trail of Tears, land runs and pipelines, deep fault-lines and hydraulic fracturing,” said Detrixhe in her artist statement. “There is immense beauty and pride in this place and also profound sorrow. The refining and sifting of the soil and the imprinting of the pattern is a meditation on this past, a gesture of sensitivity, and the desire for understanding. It is a meticulous and solitary act.”

By using this fleeting form Detrixhe questions the permanent decisions that have been made to the region’s environment. One of her red dirt rugs is currently a part of the group exhibition Shifting Landscapes at Form & Concept in Santa Fe, New Mexico through May 20, 2017. You can view a time-lapse video of Detrixhe installing one of her rugs in the video below. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

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