carol milne

Search
Results



Art

Loose Knits Flow from Hands and Needles in Glass Sculptures by Carol Milne

February 12, 2020

Grace Ebert

“Sweet Spot,” kiln cast lead crystal and knitting needles, 16 x 21 x 11 inches. All images © Carol Milne, shared with permission Carol Milne’s knit pieces might resemble your grandmother’s afghans but certainly aren’t as soft or pliable. The Seattle-based artist (previously) utilizes kiln cast lead crystal to create her loose weaves of translucent, color-coordinated glass. They often flow down from the hands and knitting needles they’re fashioned on, giving the feeling that the works could expand with just a few more stitches. “I see my knitted work as metaphor for social structure. Individual strands are weak and brittle…

 

 



Art

Delicate 'Knit' Glass Sculptures by Carol Milne

November 10, 2015

Christopher Jobson

Seattle-based artist Carol Milne (previously) fabricates flowing glass sculptures that mimic the delicate patterns of knit yarn. Contrary to the assumption that Milne has super-human ability to knit strands of molten glass by hand, the artist instead devised a somewhat complicated process that involves wax casting, mold-making, and kiln-casting. She discusses her techinques in detail in this video from Heather DiPietro. Milne also offers a PDF and a book about producing her glass work through the FAQ on her website. Over the last year Milne’s artwork has appeared in the 9th Cheongju International Craft Competition, in the Creative Knitting show…

 

 



Art

Artist Carol Milne Knits with Glass

October 15, 2014

Christopher Jobson

When first contemplating these glass sculptures by Seattle-based artist Carol Milne, your imagination runs wild trying to figure out how she does it. Glass has a melting point of around 1,500°F (815°C), so how could it possibly manipulated into neatly organized yarn-like strands that are looped around knitting needles. The answer lies in a technique invented by Milne in 2006 that involves aspects of knitting, lost-wax casting, mold-making, and kiln-casting. First, a model of the sculpture is made from wax which is then encased by a refractory mold material that can withstand extremely high temperatures. Next, hot steam is used…