dimitris

Search
Results



Art

Historical Paintings Get a Pixelated Update

February 15, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Greek artist and art director Dimitris Ladopoulos (previously) continues to use the Houdini algorithm, referred to as treemapping, to interpret paintings from the art history canon. The program calculates the density of information in a user-provided image and then divides it based on selected parameters, creating a pixelated effect that forms distinct color tiles of varying heights. In a statement about the project, Ladopoulos draws a comparison between treemapping and the original painter's use of varied brushstrokes to bring fine…

Read More

advertisement



Art Design

Color Palettes of Historic Paintings Subdivided with Algorithms by Dimitris Ladopoulos

January 25, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Athens-based motion graphics and visual designer Dimitris Ladopoulos uses a series of algorithms to subdivide his favorite works of art, breaking down the color compositions of centuries old paintings in the 3D animation software Houdini. With this process, Ladopoulos digitally observes the palette of Rembrandt Harmensz van Rijn’s Portrait of Johannes Wtenbogaert, in addition to examining the thousands of specific shades used to compose Rembrandt Peale’s portrait of his daughter Rosalba. The two digital compositions provide a contemporary view of historical paintings, showcasing how each might be analyzed as a designed object rather than a painted work. You can see more of Ladopoulos's projects, like…

Read More


Art Design

Landscapes of Glistening Digital Rectangles Formed and Subdivided by Algorithms

January 11, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Dimitris Ladopoulos (previously) creates random geometric patterns based on four-sided-forms by implementing an algorithm in the 3D animation program Houdini. The resulting designs look like intricate circuitboards or miniature architectural models, and include networks of gilded elements that glisten despite their digital composition. To create the works, the algorithm splits a rectangle vertically and then horizontally. "The number of splits is randomly selected from a given max," he explains. "The outcome is fed to the loop, again and again, depending on the number of user defined iterations. A seed value and slight alterations of the algorithm produce a variety of results." The…

Read More