Animation

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Animation

Delight-Inducing Augmented Reality Videos by Vernon James Manlapaz Combine Everyday Scenery with Fantastical Interlopers

April 18, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Everyday spaces like street markets, city sidewalks, and restaurants become fantastical playlands in the mind of Vernon James Manlapaz. The designer, who has several years of experience in animation and visual effects, creates delight-inducing augmented realities that he shares on Instagram with his more than 150,000 followers.

Manlapaz tells Colossal that his digital creations are a combination of pre-planned concepts and spontaneous inspiration. The designer always keeps his phone and 360 camera on hand so he can capture footage for scenery at any time. Manlapaz explains that he chooses to work with familiar objects and concepts that everyone can identify with as the basis for his wonder-inducing moments.

The content I make is always about bringing out that childlike wonder we all have. The goal has always been to bring joy and happiness to everyone who comes across my work. That even that 10 seconds they spend watching the content brings joy to them even for a couple of moments to their life.

Manlapaz was born and raised in Manila, Philippines. He now lives in Los Angeles where he works as a visual effects designer at Snap Inc., which you may know as Snapchat. Follow along with Manlapaz’s digital delights via Instagram. (via It’s Nice That)

 

 



Animation Design

Mesmerizing Alphabetical Animations by Mr. Kaplin

March 25, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Last year for the month of March, motion design studio Mr. Kaplin (previously) released a series of alphabet animations loosely inspired by an object or concept beginning with the featured letter. Reflective “R’s” and planetary “P’s” lie at the center of the graphic short films that imagine the letters as part of continuously looping installations or machines. The project, A Month of Type, was published to the studio’s Instagram, and was also compiled into an alphabetical list of the animations with a soundtrack by BXFTYS. If you like these inventive type interpretations check out 36 Days of Type, a project that asks designers from across the globe to animate their own letters and numbers throughout April and May. You can find more information about the creative typographic marathon, and submit your own on Instagram. (via Kottke)

 

 



Animation

Watch Sliced Fruits and Vegetables Disappear Before Your Eyes in Vibrant Animations by Kevin Parry

March 22, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Kevin Parry creates stop-motion animations that turn the quotidian task of slicing vegetables and fruit into a near psychedelic exploration of each food’s interiors. Through a common technique called strata-cut, the Toronto-based animator creates videos that slowly peel away the exteriors of peppers, avocados, and onions, revealing patterns we might not notice while preparing a simple stir-fry or stew. Although Parry is used to taking his time perfecting each frame, for this series he had to race against the clock to avoid the organic materials browning or losing their vivacious color. Make sure to watch the full video below to take a look behind-the-scenes of his process, and hear the sound effects Parry created by cutting, crunching, and chewing each featured food. You can see more of his animations on Instagram and Youtube.

 

 



Animation Art

A Geometric Light Projection by Joanie Lemercier Invites Viewers to Take a Trip Through the Stars

March 18, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Constellations is a light-based audio-visual installation by Joanie Lemercier that explores the great expanse of our universe through the presentation of morphing geometric shapes and bright glowing orbs. The three-dimensional light work is projected onto water, which gives it a rippling, holographic effect, further intensified by an electronic soundscape produced by Paul Jebanasam. “It’s an exploration of the stars, constellations and the vastness of the cosmos, suggesting the beauty of geometry, simple and complex structures of the universe,” explains Lemercier. The project was first shown in Bristol, UK in March 2018 at Layered Realities in Millennium Square, and is produced by Juliette Bibasse. You can see a full preview of the Constellations in the video below, and follow the tour schedule on Instagram and Twitter.

 

 



Animation

Over 1,400 Hand-Painted and Drawn Frames Create a Maze of Emotion in a New Music Video for Mitski

March 12, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

For the recent music video for American singer Mitski, designers and animators Saad Moosajee and Danaé Gosset teamed up with creative studio Art Camp to create an animation from 1,480 hand-painted and drawn frames. Pearl follows a single character as she free-falls through a series of scenes, crashing through an ocean to finally land in the same environment where the music video started. 3D renderings merge with traditional mediums such as charcoal, paint, dry pastel, oil pastel, ink, and colored pencils. The result is a swirling and chaotic world that consumes the main character in a wave of adrenaline-pumping emotion. You can see the full video for Pearl below. (via Vimeo Staff Picks)

 

 



Animation Illustration

Paper Illustrations and GIFs Explore the Body and Mind in New Work by Eiko Ojala

March 6, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

New York Times Sunday Review cover, animation for "Life After a hear Attack at Age 38"

New York Times Sunday Review cover, animation for “Life After a hear Attack at Age 38”

New Zealand and Estonia-based illustrator Eiko Ojala (previously) creates cut paper illustrations that present shadow and depth through creative layering of colorful pieces of paper. Recently, his editorial illustrations have been focused on the mind and body, like a cut paper GIF he created for a story on heart attacks in the New York Times. Others, like two Washington Post illustrations, attempt to uncover the thoughts and feelings sequestered in children’s minds by layering images inside the shape of a boy’s profile. You can see more of Ojala’s designs on his Instagram and Behance.

Washington Post cover illustration for "Kids Special."

Washington Post cover illustration for “Kids Special.”

New York Times Sunday Review illustration for "I Did a Terrible Thing. I Needed to Apologize".

New York Times Sunday Review illustration for “I Did a Terrible Thing. I Needed to Apologize.”

New York Times Sunday Review cover, animation and spot illustration for "Life After a hear Attack at Age 38"

New York Times Sunday Review cover, animation and spot illustration for “Life After a hear Attack at Age 38”

 

New Yorker illustrations for "Literary Hoaxes and the Ethics of Authorship."

New Yorker illustrations for “Literary Hoaxes and the Ethics of Authorship.”

Washington Post cover illustration for "Kids Special."

Washington Post cover illustration for “Kids Special.”

New York Times Sunday Review cover, animation and spot illustration for "Life After a hear Attack at Age 38"

New York Times Sunday Review cover, animation and spot illustration for “Life After a hear Attack at Age 38”

 

 



Animation

The Secret Lives of Objects Revealed in Juan Pablo Zaramella’s Trailer for Así son las cosas

March 3, 2019

Andrew LaSane

Argentinian director Juan Pablo Zaramella (previously) has shared the trailer for a cute new stop-motion television series featuring typically inanimate objects living out funny scenarios. With a title that translates in English to “The Way Things Are,” each episode in the series is one minute long and appears to focus on a different subject, from an egg catching a carton bus, to a stick of dynamite visiting a psychologist who also happens to be a pair of scissors. The sound effects and voices add to the humor. Though you’d need to know Spanish to understand the exact words, Zaramella’s scenes are universally comprehensible: a toothpaste man protests a blushing toothbrush bride’s vows, while  a roll of toilet paper demands access to an occupied bathroom.

The project won Zaramella the Audience Award at the Big Cartoon Festival 2018 and took 2nd prize at the Cyber Sousa / Xiamen International Animation Festival. His previous TV series, The Tiniest Man in World, blended stop-motion animation with live-action and is currently only available to watch if you live in Argentina. There is no word yet on when or where audiences can see Así son las cosas in full, but the two-minute trailer above is a great sample of what’s to come. It also shows the amount of time and detail that went into capturing every frame in order to tell the silly short stories. You can watch more of Zaramella’s films on Vimeo.