Art

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Art

Glitched Sculptures of Greek Gods by Zachary Eastwood-Bloom Reimagine Classicism in the Digital Age

July 11, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

“The Hidden One / Pluto” (2017), edition of 8, sterling silver, 19 x 12 x 14.5 cm. All images courtesy of the artist/Pangolin London. Photography: Steve Russell

Interdisciplinary artist Zachary Eastwood-Bloom brings old and new together in his glitched classical sculptures. The Glasgow-based artist uses cutting edge digital technology to explore age-old art motifs through a contemporary lens. Eastwood-Bloom’s Greek god series was created during his time as the Pangolin Bronze Foundry Artist in Residence. The series is inspired by the gods whose namesakes are our solar system’s planets, as well as particle physics. In an interview with Chrom Art Magazine, the artist explains his thought process:

I find it fascinating how people think. I think through making sculpture; through three-dimensional form, material, shape and surface. Other people think through numbers, words, sounds, movement, digital code etcetera. I am interested in working with people who think via different modes to me. In the digital age is that a lot of people work using digital technology now. This means that their digital information can be changed into different mediums; words can become sound, sound can become form for example.

In addition to his time at Pangolin, Eastwood-Bloom has exhibited at London’s Victoria and Albert Museum and The Royal Academy of Arts, and he is currently the artist in residence at the Scottish Ballet. Explore more of Eastwood-Bloom’s wide-ranging practice on his website and Instagram.

Kronos / Saturn Cast Bronze 2017 Edition of 3 80 x 70 x 40cm

“Cloud Gatherer / Jupiter” (2017), edition of 5, cast bronze, 74 x 40 x 30 cm.

“MSNGR / Mercury” (2017), edition of 8, sterling silver, 19 x 14 x 14 cm

“Venus Celestis” (2017), edition of 3, marble, 80 x 58 x 40 cm.

“Earth Shaker / Neptune” (2017), edition of 5, cast bronze, 39 x 39 x 27 cm

 

 



Art Craft

Radial Circles Embroidered Atop Vintage Photographs Act as Multi-Faceted Color Swatches

July 10, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Striped circles hover over vintage scenes of natural and built landscapes in embroidered interventions by Natalie Ciccoricco. Using colored threads that perfectly match the tones of the underlying images, Ciccoricco builds radial circles that act as multi-faceted color swatches. Each circle contains more than a dozen different hues of embroidery thread to pick up the nuanced colors present in the vintage images. In one photograph of a desert, the embroidered lines connect to light green cacti, blue sky, and a brown mountain. In another, the varied blue hues of water consume most of the image—and its corresponding circle—while thin black lines pick up the reflection of a boat’s hull.

Ciccoricco, who is Dutch and based in California, is represented by Zukowski Collective. When she is not crafting her embroidered images, she works as a freelance graphic designer and software language translation consultant. The artist shares her work on Instagram, and offers original artwork in her online store as well as some items on Society6.

 

 

 

 

 



Art

Stumble Upon Seven New Reclaimed Wood Trolls by Thomas Dambo in the Forests of Boom, Belgium

July 9, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

In anticipation of Tomorrowland’s 15th anniversary, the Belgium-based festival commissioned Danish artist Thomas Dambo (previously) to build seven of his world-renowned trolls throughout the De Schoore area in Boom. Like his previous installations in Copenhagen, South Korea, and northern Illinois, the new cast of creatures are built from recycled and reclaimed wood from pallets, buildings, and fallen trees. Carved wood forms geometric noses and human-sized feet, while scraggly tree branches create untamed hair and beards.

“Trash is a material and it only depends on how you work with it,” Dambo explained in a press release about the project. “We can design an entire world out of trash. We need to look at it and then think about what to do with it. That’s why I’m building these bigger-than-life scale projects. By doing that and involving people, they will open their eyes and see the possibilities and opportunities that lay in our trash. I hope that my art will inspire people to recycle and encourage them to be kind to nature and our planet.”

Although the trolls were built for the festival, visitors to the De Schoore recreational area can also happen upon the 13 to 60-foot-tall sculptures, in addition to an observation tower built from found branches. Follow along with Dambo’s friendly beasts on his website and Facebook.

 

 



Art Craft Design

Houseplants Become Hairstyles for Smiling Anthropomorphic Planters by Ceramicist Abby Ozaltug

July 9, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Canadian potter Abby Ozaltug creates charming clay planters that give an extra bit of personality to domestic leafy greens. Tousled ivy, spiky cacti, and multi-strand succulents become the unique verdant hairstyles of rotund planters. Each ceramic vessel sports arms and legs (sometimes functional, sometimes decorative), and a few of Ozaltug’s designs also have charmingly simple smiles and eyes. The artist sells her pottery on Etsy as CeramicSense, and shares updates on Instagram.

 

 



Art Colossal

Preview Artworks Available at Mother & Child Vol. II Fundraiser to Aid Families Separated at the U.S./Mexico Border

July 8, 2019

Colossal

Valerie Lueth

It’s been a year since the trauma of separated families at the U.S.-Mexico border shocked people around the world. Tragically, this humanitarian crisis continues, as documented by journalists and photographers, as well the detained children themselves. Please join us in New York City on July 15, 2019 from 6-9pm for Mother & Child Vol. II, a fundraising gallery show. Colossal is partnering with Sugarlift and a slate of talented and generous artists from around the globe to support three vetted non-profits: Kids in Need of Defense, The Young Center, and The Florence Project provide direct aid and legal support to affected families.

Original artworks, prints, and photographs have been donated by over fifty artists including Valerie Lueth, Luján Pérez, Pat Perry, Maude White, Elicia Edijanto, Lauren Matsumoto, Michael Meadors and more. If you can’t make it to Manhattan, artworks are also available for purchase in the Mother & Child web shop, starting on July 15. RSVP for free here so we can send you a quick one-time reminder: bitly.com/motherandchild2019.

Luján Pérez

Jess X. Snow

Faith XLVII

Maude White

Sonni

Elicia Edijanto

Lauren Matsumoto

Pepe Salgado

 

 



Art Craft Design

Malleable Paper Sculptures by Polly Verity Expand and Contract Into Mesmerizing Shapes

July 8, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

 

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Caterpilla Corrugation #Paperfold #corrugation #papiroflexia #paperengineering #origami

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Polly Verity (previously) has been experimenting with three-dimensional paper sculptures and intricate folds since the age of eight, when she was given a paper folding book by her step-grandfather. Instead of following an ancient origami tradition, Verity finds her inspiration in the more modern technique of abstract tessellations developed by Bauhaus experimentation in the 1920’s. Through the years she has focused primarily on repetitive abstract geometric patterns made with uncut pieces of white paper to allow her audience to focus on the works’ shapes rather than be distracted by her chosen color. In addition to small sculptures, Verity has also created one-wear-only dresses for weddings, performances, and photo shoots. You can see more of her repeated paper designs on Instagram.

 

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Art

Palette Knife Smudges and Heavy Brushstrokes Form Colorful Abstract Portraits by Joseph Lee

July 7, 2019

Andrew LaSane

Los Angeles-based artist and actor Joseph Lee (previously) brushes and smudges thick globs of oil paint to create multi-colored portraits. Vibrant layers of segmented brushstrokes focus on the emotion of human faces rather than their physicality, with facial features partially or entirely obscured from view.

Lee began painting as a way to channel his creativity after a failed acting audition. “After working on a long project, I needed to protect my energy and be selfish with my time,” he told Shape/Shift Report. “I don’t have any formal artistic training and coming from a theater background, human behavior and emotions were the closest references I had to paint.” Describing his process as “a bit of a blur,” Lee says that he shuts off mentally and fully engages with the work. No two days are the same, and that’s the way he prefers it. “I am not conscious of what I am doing much of this time,” he explained. “Obviously, there are times that call to be analytical and business-minded, but the actual process is to be fully engaged with my piece without interruptions. There are times when I’m just throwing paint around mindlessly, and other times where I find myself staring at a blank canvas for hours.”

To stare more deeply at Lee’s canvas paintings, prints, and clothing, head over to his Instagram.