Art

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Art

The Life and Works of Jean-Michel Basquiat: A Supersized New Book From TASCHEN

December 10, 2018

Andrew LaSane

Jean-Michel Basquiat, Hans Werner Holzwarth, Eleanor Nairne Hardcover, 29 x 39.5 cm, 500 pages US$ 200 | £ 150 | € 150, All images courtesy of TASCHEN

A new addition to TASCHEN’s art catalog is a massive 500-page edition that showcases the life and works of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Authored by Eleanor Nairne and edited by Hans Werner Holzwarth, the monograph is an oversized hardcover filled with large-scale reproductions of the artist’s drawings, paintings, and notebook pages. Several essays guide the reader year-by-year through Basquiat’s artistic career, from 1978 to his untimely death in 1988.

One of the most popular Black visual artist of all time, and indisputably one of the most successful artists of his era, Basquiat has been a larger-than-life art icon for over three decades. The new TASCHEN book matches that legacy not only with its physical size (which allows owners to get a closer look at some of his most seminal pieces), but with deep analysis and context of his work and the short 27 years to create it. To add a copy to your personal library, visit TASCHEN’s website.

Self-Portrait, 1982 Acrylic and oilstick on linen, 193 x 239 cm / 76 x 94 inches Photo: Rob McKeever, courtesy Gagosian Copyright: © The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Licensed by Artestar, New York

Untitled (Skull), 1981 Acrylic and oilstick on canvas, 207 x 175.5 cm / 81 1/4 x 69 inches Photo: The Eli and Edythe L. Broad Collection Copyright: © The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Licensed by Artestar, New York

Untitled (Two on Gold), 1982 Acrylic and oilstick on canvas, 203 x 317.5 cm / 80 x 125 inches Photo: Courtesy Galerie Enrico Navarra, Paris Copyright: © The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Licensed by Artestar, New York

Black, 1986 Acrylic, oilstick, photocopy collage, and wood collage on panel, 127 x 92 x 21.5 cm / 50 x 36 1/4 x 8 1/2 inches Photo: Courtesy Galerie Enrico Navarra, Paris Copyright: © The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Licensed by Artestar, New York

Anthony Clarke, 1985 Acrylic, oil, oilstick, and photocopy collage on wood, 244 x 139 cm / 96 x 54 3/4 inches Photo: Courtesy Lio Malca Copyright: © The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Licensed by Artestar, New York

Untitled, 1982 Acrylic and oilstick on linen, 193 x 239 cm / 76 x 94 inches Photo: Courtesy Gagosian Copyright: © The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Licensed by Artestar, New York

 

 



Art

Over 2.5 Acres of Projected Images and Videos Illuminate Chicago’s Riverfront

December 10, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Animation by Obscura Digital

ART ON theMART is a new Chicago-based art program that amplifies the works of contemporary artists, transforming their pieces into dazzling displays along the city’s riverfront. The new project uses large-scale projection to illuminate the 2.5 acre facade of theMART downtown for a series of curated digital animations.

The initial project included commissioned works by Jan Tichy, Diana Thater, Zheng Chongbin, and Jason Salavon. Thater’s work True Life Adventures explored the plight of elephants, zebras, giraffes and other animals who live in danger of poaching in Kenya, and included a soundtrack that was recorded in the their natural habitat. Salavon’s work Homage in Between presented 5 minutes and 35 seconds of neural network-rendered video that sampled imagery from Chicago art and design history and ended with mined images of common internet images such as cats and celebrity faces.

ART ON theMART is projecting a seasonal program of winter holiday images that run through the end of the year. Works will be projected five days a week (Wednesday – Sunday) for two hours each evening over the span of 10 months (March – December). Currently the project is accepting calls for entry for their March programming. You can enter on their website where you can also find more documentation from previous iterations.

Jason Salavon, image courtesy of Joshua Brott, Obscura Digital

All images courtesy of Joshua Brott at Obscura Digital

Diana Thater

Jason Salavon

Jan TicheyJan Tichey, image courtesy of Joshua Brott, Obscura Digital

Jan Tichey

Jason Salavon

Jason Salavon

Zheng Chongbin

Zheng Chongbin

 

 



Art Craft

New Ceramics by Heesoo Lee Capture the Ephemeral Beauty of Seasonal Woodlands

December 7, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Artist Heesoo Lee (previously) uses multi-layered techniques to form intricate trees, complete with leaves and branches, that seem to grow out of her functional ceramic vessels. Lee’s careful use of color establishes a seasonal mood in each of her works, some evoking the warm tones and fallen leaves of autumn, while others capture the barren beauty of winter. Each woodland scene is drawn from Lee’s imagination. The artist shares that she happened upon her current style of work by chance: her background is as a painter, and she used clay more as a smooth canvas until one day she was working on a tight deadline and was attempting to repair a broken pot, which inspired her to build three-dimensionally.

Lee explains that she uses translucent porcelain because its “beautiful clarity and color and is the perfect canvas for the bright underglaze and glazes I use.” The artist begins by forming each tree individually, starting with the closest and largest trees as she builds perspective by filling in the background with progressively smaller trunks, each of which is individually formed with a clay coil. Next, for her non-wintry pieces, each leaf is individually formed and applied to create the dense foliage that further increases the sense of depth on the surface of her ceramics. After an initial firing, Lee applies colored details using painted underglaze, which must be applied without overlapping different glazes to prevent discoloration after firing. Lastly, she chooses from a range of finishing glazes, selected depending on the desired effect, like an icy blue vernal pool or clearly defined leaves.

Lee shares that she first came to the United States, looking for freedom and adventure and with little knowledge of English, first living in Berkeley, California. She started re-exploring ceramics outside of the strictures of traditional Korean ceramics, rediscovering her love of the tactile medium after studying painting in college. Lee has been a working artist alongside her partner, a fellow ceramic artist for many years, and cites her time in residence at the Archie Bray Foundation as a seminal experience:

 My work, mostly in medium-range porcelain, expanded beyond painted surfaces, my mainstay for many years. I pushed my work beyond the motifs I had been using for many years–flowers, mostly–and built larger than I had before. I was inspired by my children, the landscape of the places where I lived, and my own childhood in Korea, and reflected these themes in my work. I found that working in a place like the Bray, surrounded by other artists who created a supportive, inviting, and welcoming community, gave me the freedom to grow as an artist.

Lee lives and works in Helena, Montana, where she has a home studio and kiln. You can see more of Lee’s in-progress and finished work on Instagram, and she also keeps her Etsy shop updated with new pieces available for purchase.

 

 



Art Illustration

Birds Sit Delicately on Vintage Sewing Machines and Typewriters in a New Illustrated Series by Steeven Salvat

December 6, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

French artist Steeven Salvat (previously) creates meticulously rendered drawings of animals inhabiting the same world as machinery, such as his previous crustacean series. His project Perchés showcases different breeds of birds using antique objects as areas for temporary rest, like the above owl which sits atop a typewriter. “I wanted to highlight the contrasts between lightness and brutality, fragility of nature and immortality of objects,” Salvat tells Colossal.

The artist works with watercolor on pastel paper, which he then draws millions of lines on top with .13mm Rotring pens and China ink. He collaborated with the Parisian studio Sergeant Paper to edit five drawings from the series in a signed and numbered limited edition of 100, which you can purchase via his online shop. You can view a time-lapse of one of his included drawings in the video below.

 

 



Art

Fantastical Creatures From Illuminated Manuscripts Recreated as Piñatas by Roberto Benavidez

December 6, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Robert Benavidez looks to famous paintings and literature for source material for his metallic piñatas, such as Hieronymus Bosch’s Garden of Earthly Delights (previously). The Los Angeles-based artist’s most recent series Illuminated Piñata pulls characters from the Luttrell Psalter (c. 1325-1335), a famous medieval manuscripts. The book contains illustrations of fantastical hybrid creatures, which Benavidez further explores by creating three-dimensional sculptures using traditional piñata motifs.

Works from his Bosch series will be on view at the Riverside Art Museum in Riverside, CA in the group exhibition BEAST, opening February 2, 2019. You can see more of his sculptural piñatas on his Instagram and website.

 

 



Art Illustration

Affirmational Text Art and Doodles Combine in Immersive Murals by Shantell Martin

December 6, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

New York-based British artist Shantell Martin is known for her black and white doodles which combine patch-worked faces with straightforward messages. Martin’s multi-dimensional works address complex issues such as identity, intersectionality, and other topics relating to the modern human condition. Her public murals and immersive gallery presentations are made intuitively, building fields of loose drawings with a meditative style. Martin teaches as an adjunct professor at NYU Tisch in the Interactive Telecommunications Program, where she combines visual art with personal storytelling and technology. You can follow her global drawings on Instagram and take a short peek into her process in the video below.

 

 



Art

Thousands of Shards of Glass Imitate Blurred Motion in a Towering Public Sculpture by Costas Varotsos

December 5, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

First completed in 1988, Dromeas or “The Runner,” is a 40-foot-tall public sculpture created by Greek artist Costas Varotsos. The densely layered work is formed from thousands of jagged shards of greenish-grey glass which are stacked around iron in the formation of a runner in motion. Originally the piece was installed in the Athens’s Omonia Square, but due to fear that it would topple from underground metro vibrations, in 1994 the city moved the piece to Megalis tou Genous Sholi square. When designing the sculpture, Varotsos considered which types of movement occur in these public spaces and how they might impact the viewing of his work.

“The position of people on the square is never fixed,” he explains. “As is the case with every city, here, too, objects and buildings are things you see while in motion. Rarely do you stop to look closely at something. Individuals observing the sculpture do so at two speeds, depending on where they are on the square: walking on the sidewalks or driving by in a car. The kind of space operating here is not only a purely visual one, but also one open to the sense of touch; one generating a tactile sensation.”

The ambiguous figure is meant to capture the exact moment one finishes a race—be that a literal translation of a marathon, or a more loose interpretation of conquering a challenging moment. You can see more of Varotsos’s public sculptures on his website. (via Atlas Obscura)

 

 

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