Art

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Art

Eiji Watanabe frees thousands of field guide butterflies

April 25, 2011

Christopher Jobson


(click images for detail)

In his installation A Butterfly’s Eye View artist Eiji Watanabe eviscerates butterfly field guides, releasing the delicately cut insects and pinning them to the walls around the gutted textbooks. It’s almost as if he bestows life to these little paper creatures, and yet they often remain organized in a tight grid, an entire new species of butterfly. The images came via a number of Flickr accounts.

 

 



Art

Miso

April 25, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Some wonderful paper works by Australian artist Miso (Stanislava Pinchuk) who pastes these large pieces around the streets of Melbourne. Via her web site:

Miso is really taken with the idea of art, and especially street art, as being something which binds us as a community. It functions in a very old fashioned way, in that it becomes a way of telling and sharing stories and images, embedding them within the city. Like folk art, it comes to have a very particular, practical function. It brings us together as makers, viewers and consumers, finding new pieces and exploring the possibilities of our cities.

(via my love for you)

 

 



Art

Yasuhiro Sakurai

April 25, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Tokyo-based sculptor Yasuhiro Sakurai carves these stunning wall-mounted sculptures of mysterious women and their luscious hairstyles from cypress wood, giving them an almost golden appearance. I know painfully little about the artist and his work as there is almost nothing I can find online about him and my requests to Galleria Grafica Tokio where he is represented have gone unanswered. He attended the Aichi Prefectural University of Fine Arts and Music and will have work at the upcoming “One Moment” show at Chiba Citizens’ Gallery.

 

 



Art

The Parking Ticket Emotional Reclamation Project: Guerilla Artist Inserts Artwork into Parking Tickets

April 24, 2011

Christopher Jobson

The Parking Ticket Emotional Reclamation Project (PTERP) is a project recently started in Brooklyn, New York by an anonymous artist (whom we’ll call Dave) that has recently expanded to Boulder, Colorado as part of the Communikey Festival of Electronic Arts. The idea is pretty straightforward: Dave organizes the creation of artworks by fellow artists, children, or anyone that wants to take a stab at dulling the anger/rage an individual encounters when discovering a parking ticket left on their car. After its creation Dave scours the streets covertly stuffing the one-of-a-kind artworks into parking violation envelopes.

Here’s a huge gallery of work recently created and distributed in Boulder. Via email Dave says he doesn’t stick around to see people’s reactions, however he mentions this recent encounter:

I was distributing some final tickets on The Hill in Boulder before I left, and as I was walking away from the car to go into Roma Cafe the dude who’s car it was walked up and had obviously seen me messing with his windshield. I said “You got a ticket but you also got something else” and was walking away. His friend was like “Is that the parking ticket thing?!?!” (They had heard about it). They were psyched. He said it made his day.

To learn more about PTERP you can check out the official website and their Facebook page, or watch the video below.

 

 



Art

One man, 100,000 toothpicks, and 35 years: An incredible kinetic sculpture of San Francisco

April 23, 2011

Christopher Jobson

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Thirty five years ago I had yet to be born, but artist Scott Weaver had already begun work on this insanely complex kinetic sculpture, Rolling through the Bay, that he continues to modify and expand even today. The elaborate sculpture is comprised of multiple “tours” that move pingpong balls through neighborhoods, historical locations, and iconic symbols of San Francisco, all recreated with a little glue, some toothpicks, and an incredible amount of ingenuity. He admits in the video that there are several toothpick sculptures even larger than his, but none has the unique kinetic components he’s constructed. Via his website Weaver estimates he’s spent over 3,000 hours on the project, and the toothpicks have been sourced from around the world:

I have used different brands of toothpicks depending on what I am building. I also have many friends and family members that collect toothpicks in their travels for me. For example, some of the trees in Golden Gate Park are made from toothpicks from Kenya, Morocco, Spain, West Germany and Italy. The heart inside the Palace of Fine Arts is made out of toothpicks people threw at our wedding.

See the sculpture for yourself at the Tinkering Studio through the end of June. Photos courtesy of their Flickr gallery.

Update: Rolling Through the Bay has been moved to the American Visionary Art Museum through September 2012. (thnx, jenny!)

 

 



Art

Dan Tobin Smith

April 23, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Beautiful typographic installations from by artist Dan Tobin Smith. Posting will be light during the holiday, back in full force Monday!

 

 



Art

So remember that time somebody photographed you doing that incredibly compromising thing and the pictures got out on the internet and Erin Riley wove a tapestry of it?

April 22, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Yeah, so this is that time.

Philadelphia-based artist Erin M. Riley (NSFW in a weird explicit textile sort of way) scours the internet for embarrassing and downright sketchy photos of people and weaves them into elaborate wall-covering tapestries. From her interview on Fecal Face:

So I search “upskirt”, or “drunk girl puking” then look at sketchy pictures for an hour or two, find a few that are really awesome and they sit in my folder for a bit until im ready to weave them. I don’t like to crop or alter the images too much, so it has to be a good mix of all of the elements. I like the images to be attractive and alluring while also showing you how creepy and depressing life can be. Then I trace the image on a clear sheet and project it with an overhead projector to scale. I copy it on large craft paper and lay it under my warp while I weave.

Due to the safe-for-work nature of this blog I haven’t posted the craziest stuff, so head on over to her blog here ya degenerates. (via fecal face)