Art

Section



Art

Deborah Butterfield

August 23, 2011

Christopher Jobson

A number of new works by Deborah Butterfield who assembles these striking horse sculptures using tree branches made from bronze. I can’t imagine the process involved in finding the perfect piece of wood for each delicate line. Her upcoming show at Danese in NYC runs September 9 through October 8, 2011. (via ex-chamber)

 

 



Art Design

Solitaire “Win” Screen Constructed from Over 1,000 3D Playing Cards

August 23, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Creative duo Lars Marcus Vedeler and Theo Tveterås of Oslo, Norway have come together to form the experimental design team Skrekkøgle that I was originally tempted to call an art collective, however via their website they suggest otherwise.

We don’t think of ourselves as artists, as we come from a product/interaction design background. What we see ourselves as is a studio that does what it very well pleases, experimenting with products and electronics and the like, not necessarily being tied to a client.

Sounds like every designers dream to me. A number of their projects have bounced around the blogs lately, my favorite being this hilarious three-dimensional sculpture of the win screen for Windows Solitaire. Also check out their exceedingly clever big money project that makes nearby objects look tiny by placing them next to an enormous replica of the 50 Euro cent piece and photographing them using using tilt-shift photography. I can’t wait to see what they come up with next. Reading their blog they seem to fancy Colossal—what’s up guys? (via quipsologies)

 

 



Art

Fantastic Kinetic Sculptures by Limee Young

August 22, 2011

Christopher Jobson

South Korean artist Limee Young makes these diabolically complex kinetic sculptures using stainless steel components, embedded cpu boards, microprocessors, servos, and other mechanical doodads I’m not going to even pretend to understand. The devices seem to have no practical function other than being completely mesmerizing in a strangely perfect way. You can read a bit more about the devices on his blog and see a couple larger images on mu-um.

 

 



Art

Ludo in Chicago

August 22, 2011

Christopher Jobson

French street artist LUDO made a quick, sweeping tour across the U.S. this month with stops in Los Angeles, Chicago, and New York. His signature wheatpastes are hard to miss, often hybridizing insects and plants with mechanical objects such as tanks and airplanes. The above works photographed by Brock Brake are from here in Chicago, but head over to Arrested Motion for a broader overview of the artist and his work in other cities. Thanks to Brock and Pawn Works (previously) for hosting the artist.

 

 



Art Design

Liquid Picnic Table

August 22, 2011

Christopher Jobson

While in residence at the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts in Omaha, artist Michael Beitz (previously) built this 10-foot-long outdoor picnic table that seemingly overflows its space on a gallery terrace and drips down a railing to a level below. The table was built from laminated poplar and marine epoxy and a video about its development and construction can be seen here. Special thanks to the Bemis Center for providing imagery for this post.

 

 



Art

A Helium-filled Kinetic Drawing Sculpture by Karina Smigla-Bobinski

August 16, 2011

Christopher Jobson

ADA – Analog Interactive Installation, is a kinetic sculpture by German-based artist Karina Smigla-Bobinski. The installation is made form an enormous helium-inflated sphere trapped inside a small room that’s spiked with dozens of protruding charcoal pieces which scrape the edges of the gallery wall as participants push, toss, and otherwise manipulate it. Most recently it was on display at the Electronic Language International Festival in São Paulo this Summer that took place in São Paulo. It’s fascinating to me that given the constraints of the sphere and room, a single outcome (pictured at bottom) is destined to emerge, but yet requires the participation of dozens if not hundreds of gallery visitors. Reminds me of the work of Roman Ondák. (via we make money not art, photos courtesy we make money not art, s.antonio, and the artist)

 

 



Art Music

Yoshihiko Satoh Turns the Guitar Volume Up to 12

August 16, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Japanese artist Yoshihiko Satoh takes mass-produced goods and alters or multiplies them to “unleash the energy residing in their function and shape”. Or, simply speaking, he multiples them by awesome. His guitar sculptures above are by far his most impressive works, however he’s also experimented with exaggerated length in irons, toy trucks, and even functional mopeds. His latest work is on exhibit at Roentgenwerke AG in Tokyo through August 27. (via lustik and wonderful opportunity)