Art

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Art Documentary Illustration

Pardon My Dust: The Chalk Art of Peter Han

July 17, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Designer Peter Han (he rejects being called an artist) has worked as a conceptual designer for a number of different video games and films, but has also become known for a drawing class he teaches called Dynamic Sketching. Using only chalk, Han works with his students to let go of their preconceived notions about art and design by working in a fast, impermanent medium that always ends up being erased. The hope is to eventually free them from the idea of permanence and allow their ideas to grow through making mistakes.

In this short film titled Pardon My Dust directed by Adriel de la Torre, we catch a quick glimpse of Han at work as he works with his students and draws some impressive illustrations that of course meet a fateful end under a felt eraser. (via colossal submissions)

 

 



Art

Melting Ceramics by Livia Marin

July 17, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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When dropping a ceramic plate or cup we’ve all braced for the familiar sound of impact as the object explodes into a multitude of sharp fragments on the kitchen floor. Artist Livia Marin imagines a wholly different demise for ceramic bowls, cups and tea pots in this series of work titled Nomad Patterns.

Inexplicably, each piece seems to melt onto a surface while strangely retaining its original printed pattern. The designs are actually a Willow Pattern motif, a pastiche of Chinese landscape decoration created by an English man in the 1790s “as if” it were Chinese. She adds via email that the objects “appear as staged somehow indeterminately between something that is about to collapse or has just been restored; between things that have been invested with the attention of care but also have the appearance of a ruin.” The 32 objects were on view at Eagle Gallery in London in 2012.

You can see much more over on her website, and learn more at Eagle Gallery. (via if magazine)

 

 



Art

Urban Species: Kinetic Lifeforms Created by U-Ram Choe

July 15, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Korean artist U-Ram Choe lives and works in Seoul where he creates highly ornate kinetic sculptures that mimic forms and motions found in nature. Choe uses various metals, motors, gears, and custom CPU boards to control the precise motions of each sculpture that are at times perfectly synchronized and other times completely random. With names like “Unicus – cavum ad initium” and “Arbor Deus Pennatus” it’s clear the artist treats each new work like a brand new species.

The artworks are so complex each “organism” is shipped with a manual to show collectors and galleries how to maintain and fix various components. Choe tells the Creator’s Project in one of the videos above how some of the works in his studio live a complete lifecycle where they are at first born and put on display, but after time begin to degrade as certain parts stop working. Eventually he raids old artworks for parts and uses them to build new ones.

Watch the videos above to see a good sampling of his work both old and new, and he has a huge archive of videos for nearly 50 artworks over on Vimeo.

 

 



Art

Urban Herd: Air Rifle BB Taxidermy by Courtney Timmermans

July 11, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Using thousands of air rifle BBS artist Courtney Timmermans creates impressive taxidermy heads of wild animals. The body of work titled Urban Herd will be on view here in Chicago starting tomorrow at Jean Albano Gallery and will run through August 24th.

 

 



Art Documentary

The Chandelier Tree of Silver Lake

July 11, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Several years ago Los Angeles-based airbrush make-up artist, photographer and designer Adam Tenenbaum was bequeathed several large vintage chandeliers that he thought might look good in his home, but to his dismay they were a bit too large. Then an idea struck him: why not hang a few in the giant tree in his front yard. The Chandelier Tree was born. Filmmaker Colin Kennedy passed the tree almost daily for nearly six years and finally decided to sit down the Tenenbaum to shoot this short documentary about this strange and beautiful tree. (via kuriositas, boing boing)

 

 



Art

Xu Bing Arrives at Mass MoCA With His 12-Ton Birds Made of Construction Equipment

July 10, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Chinese artist Xu Bing has several works currently on view as part of an exhibition at Mass MoCA in Massachusetts. Among the works are two 12-ton birds titled Phoenix that fill the museum’s football field-sized Building 5. Two years in the making, the birds were constructed from materials collected at various Chinese construction sites including demolition debris, steel beams, tools, and assorted remnants of migrant laborers. The male Phoenix titled Feng measures 90 feet long, and the female, Huang, is nearly 100 feet in length from beak to its steel tail feathers. Both birds are illuminated from within through a network of lights.

Somewhat similar to artists Yao Lu and Ai Weiwei, Xu Bing seems to be commenting on China’s rapid commercial development that is drastically altering the physical and cultural landscape within the country. Phoenix will be on view October 27th. (via junk culture, hyperallergic, my modern met)