Art

Section



Art Food Photography

Amazing Animations of Fruit and Vegetable MRIs

October 4, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Animated MRI of corn. All images © Andy Ellison, shared with permission.

Andy Ellison works at the BU medical school in Boston where he frequently works with a research-only MRI scanner. Over the past few months he’s been sharing some fantastic animated gifs of his calibration and quality control scans using assorted fruits, vegetables and other plants. As you can see the results are absolutely mesmerizing and I urge you to check out his blog, Inside Insides, for many more scans and hi-res images.

 

Corn

Broccoli

Broccoli

Garlic

Starfruit

 

 



Art

Giant Tree Branch Sculpture Installed at Croajingolong National Park by Corey Thomas

October 3, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Spinifex is a recent sculpture by Australian artist Corey Thomas. The piece was constructed from local tree branches and other plant material before being air-lifted with a helicopter into Croajingolong National Park in Victoria. (via my darkened eyes)

 

 



Art

Magnetized Cyanotype Butterfly Installations by Tasha Lewis

October 3, 2012

Christopher Jobson

For the past few months Indianapolis-based artist Tasha Lewis has been traveling around the country creating guerrilla installations using a swarms of 400 cyanotype butterflies printed on cotton fabric (cyanotype is a photographic printing process that results in blue images, just like blueprints). Each blue insect is embedded with powerful magnets allowing her to place them on any metallic surface without causing damage, which as far as impermanent street art goes, is brilliant. Of her work she says:

My current body of work was drawn from an investigation into the cultural/scientific/historical context in which the cyanotype was born. Popularized by scientists, and botanists in particular, the cyanotype is intrinsically tied into the scientific recording boom of the late 19th and early 20th century. These are the times of the curiosity cabinet, the prints of Anna Atkins and a rush of explorers/scientists to colonial lands only to bring back specimens from foreign ecosystems. [.. ] The cyanotype is a process of documenting. The resultant image is a kind of scientific stand-in for the actual object in question. It is the trace of the original. In this way, like cyanotype’s use for building blue prints in more recent centuries, my work is formed as the re-presentation of something real; it is somehow not quite the object itself.”

Tasha has published photos of numerous installations on her Tumblr, definitely worth a look.

 

 

 



Art

A Horse Made of Computer Keys by Babis Cloud

October 2, 2012

Christopher Jobson

I’m not sure I fully understand the meaning behind this great sculpture made of resin and recycled computer keys by Babis Cloud, but I certainly enjoy looking at it. The piece is titled Hedonism(y) Trojaner, derived from the giant mythological Trojan horse built by the Greeks that was used to sneak an elite force of soldiers into the city of Troy under the charade of presenting the city with a gift. On some level I suppose Babis is making a reference to the negative aspects of technology (viruses, irrational dependence on computers), but you can read a bit more explanation over on iGNANT. If you liked this also check out the work of Sarah Frost.

 

 



Art Illustration

Portraits Drawn with Tea, Vodka, Whiskey and Ink by Carne Griffiths

October 1, 2012

Christopher Jobson

UK-based illustrator Carne Griffiths creates these striking portraits with uncommon mediums such as tea brandy, vodka, whiskey, graphite and calligraphy ink. His drawings most frequently explore human and floral forms, as says he’s “fascinated by the flow of line and the ‘invisible lines’ that connect us to the natural world.” The four pieces above are part of a limited edition postcard set just released by Griffiths, each of which comes in a fancy custom-illustrated, wax-sealed envelope. He also has a solo show at Ink-d Gallery in Brighton that closes this Saturday. (via behance)

 

 



Art Design

Chandeliers Made from Salvaged Bicycle Parts

September 28, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Artist Carolina Fontoura Alzaga constructs impressive chandeliers using chains, wheels and other parts from old bicycles as part of a series she calls CONNECT. Alzaga has lived in Brazil and Mexico and now works out of a studio in Los Angeles where the Etsy Blog recently caught up with her to conduct the interview and tour above.
Of her work she says:

This developing body of work draws inspiration from the aesthetics of Victorian era chandeliers, DIY and Bike Culture, and follows an art tradition of utilizing non artistic materials for sculpture.

This series addresses class codes, power dynamics, reclaimed agency, and ecological responsibility. The traditional chandelier is seen as a bourgeois commodity, a cachet of affluence, excess, and as such power. The recycled bicycle parts become a representation of the dismissed, invisible, and powerless, but are also an affirmation of self-propelled movement. The bicycle chandelier thereby creates a new third meaning of reclaimed agency.

I think if I ever had need for a chandelier it would definitely be one of these. Alzaga has a number of pieces currently available in her shop. (via laughing squid)