Art

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Art

Watch Part Motorcycles

July 4, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Artist Dan Tanenbaum constructs these amazing miniature motorcycles using nothing but watch parts. You can see much more of his work over on Facebook, and if you liked this also check out the work of Natsumi Honda.

 

 



Art

New Street Artist 'Bored' Turns Chicago Sidewalks into an Alternative Monopoly Game

July 3, 2012

Christopher Jobson

I was walking in Chicago’s Logan Square neighborhood a few weekends ago when I happened upon an enormous stack of Monopoly ‘Chance’ cards made from plywood and bolted to the sidewalk announcing a marriage proposal at a nearby church. It was awesome. Immediately I started wondering if it was a genuine proposal? Was it a joke? Or could it be… ART?! Chicago has a fair amount street art if you know where to look, but it’s mostly spray painted stencils and paste-ups, and it’s extremely rare to see something three dimensional or sculptural.

As it turns out I wasn’t the first blogger to make the discovery. Nate Berg from the Atlantic found several sets of cards and actually went to the Armitage Baptist Church nearby to ask if they knew anything (they didn’t). He did figure out that the Monopoly pieces originally appeared back in April and several people on Reddit had a field day trying to piece the puzzle together. Everyone realized there were even more installations around the city, and not only that, the messages on the Chance and Community Chest cards were occasionally being painted over and replaced with other humorous and obscure messages.

After a few desperate tweets and some emailing, I finally got in touch with the artist (or artists!) known as Bored. The person (or group) chooses to remain anonymous but expressed via email their dissatisfaction at the lack of quality street art around Chicago. Saying specifically that “the goal of this entire project has been to present something different than a stencil painted on the ground or a poster pasted to a wall. Something 3-dimensional that can be picked up, beaten down, kicked, yanked, grabbed, and broken. And if someone ever put forth the effort to remove it, like a weed it will always grow back. And if left alone it will evolve into something different.”

While there are a number of good street artists in Chicago, this is definitely a welcome change of pace. I’m really excited to see this project evolve and hope they have more ideas brewing.

 

 



Art

New Temporary Whiteboard Drawings by Gregory Euclide

July 3, 2012

Christopher Jobson

I’ve long been a fan of Minnesota artist Gregory Euclide whose intricate multimedia installations and sculptures often contain an unusual mix of visual elements ranging from strange architectural creations to natural phenomena like trees and rivers built from uncommon materials. Euclide also works as a high school teacher and during his brief 25-minute lunch breaks has been exploring the limitations of time and materials by creating these gorgeous temporary ink drawings on a standard school whiteboard. Via David B. Smith Gallery, he says:

“In our culture, there is a strong emphasis on reproduction and the original seems less important. My students were shocked when I would erase the original, because they saw it firsthand, and they were disturbed that it was destroyed. People who do not see the original have no problem only looking at it on a screen or as a print, but once you see the original it is hard to let it go or believe that it could be destroyed.” Euclide relates this concept to societyʼs impact on the natural world by stating, “When people get to know nature and spend time in it, they start to realize how their actions affect it.”

The series of works called Laid Down and Wiped Away is now available in limited edition prints over at David B. Smith Gallery.

 

 

 



Art

A Sun of Thread: 84 Miles of String Suspended at MIA by HOT TEA

July 2, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Known mostly in for his graffiti-influenced string tags on the streets of Minneapolis, Eric Rieger aka HOT TEA, recently completed this massive installation at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. Titled Letting Go, the piece uses 84 miles of colored string that forms the artist’s interpretation of the sun. In a statement about the work Rieger says:

At least once in our lives we have all had to let go of something we truly love. Whether it be a pet, personal object or in some cases, loved ones. This piece is my interpretation of the sun. The sun brings life and also represents happiness, warmth and energy. When letting go of something or someone we truly love, sometimes it is okay to celebrate their lives along with mourning. This piece represents the warmth and love I have received from those I have had to let go of.

Definitely check out the timelapse of the installation, the upside-down haircut at the end looks like it was a lot of fun. Letting Go will be on view through September 2 at MIA. Photographs courtesy Amanda Hankerson and Eric Rieger.

 

 

 



Art

Interactive Paintings on the Streets of Malaysia

July 1, 2012

Christopher Jobson







A great new street artist is making a splash in Malaysia this month. Painter Ernest Zacharevic created four new works where his painted figures of mischievous children are seen interacting with their physical surroundings: an old bicycle, a motorcycle, or even windows on the side of a building. His most popular piece of two small children on a large bicycle has become a major destination in the city with dozens of people stopping to take creative photos. I want to thank Annie and Ross of the very fine AsiaDreaming blog for providing many of the photographs for this post. The rest you can see on Zacharevic’s Facebook. (via lustik, art and seasons)

 

 



Art

Human Nature: Jason deCaires Taylor's Submerged Figurative Sculptures Form Thriving Artificial Reefs

June 27, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Artist Jason deCaires Taylor was born in Great Britain in 1974 and spent his youth diving the coral reefs of Malaysia where he developed a strong bond with the sea and nature, then as a teenager began a pursuit of art and graffiti. In an incredible marriage of his two passions, Taylor has since become famous for his immense underwater installations in locations off the coast of Mexico, the Bahamas, and the West Indies where he uses eco-friendly concrete sculptures specifically designed to harbor life. The artificial reefs are photographed and filmed in numerous stages from the moment they are first submerged to months and years later after thriving ecosystems form within his artwork.

This Saturday, Taylor will have his first debut solo gallery exhibition titled Human Nature at Jonathan leVine Gallery in New York. Via the gallery:

For this exhibition, the artist selected photographs of some of his major public projects. While some works were photographed as soon as they were submerged, others feature various stages of coral and algae growth that has occurred over a period of time. The resulting photography (much like the experience of viewing in person) evokes a sense of discovering forgotten civilizations, and surreal narratives of lost, sunken worlds.

The show opens June 30th at 7pm and runs through July 28th. If I was in New York I would absolutely not miss this. For some great behind-the-scenes photos, Jonathan leVine was lucky enough to visit Taylor in Mexico for one of the coolest “studio visits” I’ve ever seen.