Art

Section



Art Photography

Landscapes Formed From Human Bodies by Carl Warner

July 30, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Shin Knee Valley

In this series of photographs by Carl Warner, human bodies have been contorted, lit, and manipulated to form expansive landscapes reminiscent of barren deserts and mountains. The London-based photographer who might be best known for his Foodscapes, says that he shoots all of the forms in his studio to focus attention on “one person’s body, creating a sense of place so that a body that is lived in becomes a place to live.” The images are then digitally pieced together using Photoshop. If you liked this also check out the work of Arno Rafael Minkkinen and of course Spencer Tunick (nsfw). (via PetaPixel)

 

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Valley of the Reclining Woman

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The Desert of Sleeping Men

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Desert of Backs

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Shoulder Hill Valley

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Headless Horizon

 

 



Art

Rainbow Anatomy by Shok Oner

July 30, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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London-based street artist Shok Oner has been making work since the 1980s. I’m really enjoying his current series of rainbow hued x-ray pieces, some of which have been turned into prints. You can follow him over on Facebook and Flickr. (via street anatomy)

 

 



Art

Calm: A Field of Liquid Construction Debris on the Streets of Vancouver by MadeIn Company

July 29, 2013

Christopher Jobson

What looks like a giant pile of rubble outside the Shangri-La Hotel in downtown Vancouver is actually an art installation by Chinese art collective MadeIn Company titled Calm. All is not as it seems. Pass by in a hurry and you’ll hardly notice this giant pile of broken cement blocks, grass, and construction waste, but stand next to it for just a moment and you’ll notice something almost imperceptible: the entire pile of rubble is moving, slightly undulating atop a giant hidden reservoir of water.

The large field of debris was collected from a renovated Vancouver synagogue and installed on an exhibition space, Offsite, belonging to the Vancouver Art Gallery last April. According to various news reports people seem pretty polarized by the installation, either loving or hating it. The work was inspired by the near perpetual state of urban development currently underway in China. Via the gallery:

Calm’s ambiguity and unexpected ability to move provoke us to question ways of observing, believing and understanding facts, and remind us that the truth often differs from what it seems. In this context, Calm comments on the concerns that arise alongside urban development and the gentrification of residential neighbourhoods, whether in Vancouver or Shanghai. While the volume of construction in Vancouver might pale in comparison and scale to that of Shanghai, there are currently several retail and residential expansions underway within a five-kilometre radius of Offsite.

The installation will be on view through September 29th and you can learn a bit more over on CTV News. It should be noted that if you’re in Vancouver the installation is not actually meant to be touched or climbed on. You can see a similar installation from Benjamin Boré who created the same sort of effect with a brick sidewalk.

 

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Art

Pacific Light: Macro Footage of Ink, Oil and Soap Shot by Ruslan Khasanov

July 27, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Russian graphic designer Ruslan Khasanov who is probably best known for his experiments in liquid typography just released this experimental video where he plays with the interaction between ink, oil, and soap. Khasanov says he became inspired while cooking with a mixture of oil and soy sauce when he noticed the small black beads begin to form at the bottom of a container. He then began playing with a mixture of ink and soap to create this amazing mix of blue, white, yellow, and magenta. See everything in motion in the video above, and you can see some larger stills over on Behance.

 

 



Art Design

Translucent Hermit Shell Crabs Adorned with Architectural Cityscapes by Aki Inomata

July 26, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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NYC / © Aki Inomata courtesy of Ai Kowada Gallery

Created in 2009 by Japanese artist Aki Inomata, these fantastic little cityscapes atop hermit crab shells were part of a body of work titled “Why not hand over a shelter to hermit crabs?.” Keeping the welfare of the animal in mind, Inomata studied the needs of the hermit crab to select a compatible shell and used a CT scanner to image the interior of seashells so she could adapt her own miniature sculptures into suitable homes. The small buildings and skylines were then designed atop the plastic shell forms to mimic the architecture of various cities including New York, Tokyo, Bangkok, and elsewhere.

As hermit crabs outgrow their shells it becomes necessary to find a new, larger home. With this project Inomata hoped to draw a parallel to our own need as humans to migrate or find shelter in a new city. Photographs of the final works were on display at Ai Kowada Gallery. (via designboom)

 

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NYC / © Aki Inomata courtesy of Ai Kowada Gallery

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Ksar of Ait-Ben-Haddou / © Aki Inomata courtesy of Ai Kowada Gallery

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Bangkok / © Aki Inomata courtesy of Ai Kowada Gallery

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Zaanse Schans / © Aki Inomata courtesy of Ai Kowada Gallery

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Zaanse Schans / © Aki Inomata courtesy of Ai Kowada Gallery

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Tokyo / © Aki Inomata courtesy of Ai Kowada Gallery

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Santorini / © Aki Inomata courtesy of Ai Kowada Gallery

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Honfleur / © Aki Inomata courtesy of Ai Kowada Gallery

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Installation view at Ai Kowada Gallery / © Aki Inomata courtesy of Ai Kowada Gallery

 

 



Art

Humorous and Political Street Art by Escif

July 25, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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On-Off (Katowice, Poland)

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On-Off (Katowice, Poland)

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Wikileaks (Valencia, Spain)

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Ne travaillez jamais (Besancon, France)

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Gentrification (Valencia, Spain)

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HELP (Praghe / Czech Republic)

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El rescate del euro (Niort, France)

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The Enlightened Vandalism (Vila-real, Spain)

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Lock (Montreal, Canada)

Spanish muralist and street artist Escif hails from Valencia, Spain but is actively globally with recent works popping up throughout Canada, Italy, and France. His use of subdued colors and simple lines helps the artist communicate his humorous and often direct commentary on capitalism, politics, the economy and other sensitive social issues. His work is much more about the message than style. In an interview with Unurth the artist shares:

Although sometimes is not easy to separate, I try to focus my work around concepts, not just shapes. I try to found my style like the consequences of my own ideas. I understand the painting as an exercise of reflection that can be shared with people. I’m not looking for decorative paintings, I try to wake up viewers minds.

Above is just a tiny fraction of Escif’s work over the last two years or so. You can see much more on his blog Street Against, on Facebook, or over on Flickr. (via arrested motion)