Craft

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Craft Design

Broken Ceramics Found on the Beach, Turned Into Chopstick Rests Using Kintsugi

June 13, 2016

Johnny Waldman

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“As every Japanese has realized, the waves can take away a great deal from us,” says artist Tomomi Kamoshita. But it is also true that we greatly benefit from it.” Using broken pieces of ceramics that she picked up on the shore, and combining it with pieces of her own broken ceramics, the Tokyo-based potter uses the ancient kintsugi method of repairing ceramics to turn the shards into one-of-a-kind chopstick rests.

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If the broken pieces of ceramics could talk, some would tell you that they fell off a ship. Others would tell you they were swept away by a tsunami. Some might even simply have been thrown away. But rather than focus on their tragic state of being, and how they got that way, Kamoshita looks to the future; the revival. “I wanted to revive what wave have brought us,” she says. In fact, many of the shards have been polished by the waves and sand while all the while retaining their beautiful colors.

As a potter, Kamoshita was skilled in the ancient craft of kintsugi: “a Japanese traditional repairing technique used to connect broken pieces together with gold.” Using this method – intended to accentuate the cracks rather than hide them – the artist pieces together the broken ceramics she’s collected. The pink pieces, she explains, are her own broken ceramics, which she likens to the cherry blossoms that come back to life every Spring.

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Kamoshita received honorable mention in the 2016 Ronin | Globus Artist-in-Residence Program, for which Spoon & Tamago [Colossal’s sister site] was a judge. The ceramic pieces will be on display in the group exhibition “Contemporary Talents of Japan” from June 23 to July 30, 2016 at the Ronin Gallery in New York. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

 

 



Craft Design

New Winged Insects Constructed from Video Game and Computer Components

June 2, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Before old circuit boards find their way to the landfill, Portsmouth, UK-based artist Julie Alice Chappell gives them new life as winged insects. Tearing the boards from old computers and video game systems she cuts and sculpts them into crawly creatures that resemble butterflies, dragonflies and even cockroaches. The upcycled bugs are further adorned with other electrical components that form various appendages. Each piece is one-of-a-kind and she sells them through her Etsy shop.

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Craft Design

Felted Toy Specimens by Hine Mizushima

May 31, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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When you think of cuddly stuffed animals made from textiles the top candidates would probably include teddy bears or bunny rabbits. Perhaps lower on the list would be squids, cicadas, and sea slugs, and yet Vancouver-based artist Hine Mizushima has chosen these unusual creatures as the the subjects of her wildly popular hand-creafted felt toys. Her one-of-a-kind plush critters have been displayed in galleries around the world and she’s turned many of them into prints which she sells on Etsy and Society6. You can see some of her latest work on Behance.

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Craft Food

Felted Veggies Cling to Embroidery Hoops by Veselka Bulkan

May 23, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Munich-based artist Veselka Bulkan (previously) continues to craft these whimsical veggies that dangle from embroidery hoops. Each piece is an amalgam of embroidered leaves affixed to felted carrots, beets, radishes and other colorful roots. Bulkan sells many of her creations via her online shop, Little Herb Boutique, and you can see her process on Instagram. (via Illusion)

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Art Craft History Photography

An Historically Accurate 19th Century Photo Studio Built in 1:12 Scale

May 13, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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All images via Ali Alamedy

Turkey-based artist Ali Alamedy had been building miniature sets for seven years when he came across documentation of Charles Miner's photography studio from the early 1900s. Inspired by the way sunlight was used to illuminate studio sets, Alamedy decided to build his own version in 1:12 scale. The project took him over nine months, using hundreds of feet of wood, and building more than 100 miniature objects designed specifically to fit the era.

Due to few images being available of photography studios at that time, Alamedy read extensively to figure out what tools, techniques, styles, and colors were used within the studios (all images were in black and white). One of the hardest challenges during the completion of the model was the camera, as each fold in the bellow in real life is just 3 cm. The final 1:12 scale camera has 124 2 mm folds that were all meticulously created by hand.

You can take a look at more of Alamedy’s miniature scenes on his Instagram and Facebook. (via PetaPixel).

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Art Craft

New Embroidered Works on Rackets, Shoes, and Fences by Danielle Clough

May 10, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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All images provided by Danielle Clough

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Embroidering rackets rather than swinging them, Danielle Clough (previously) uses thick thread to create multi-colored images of aloe and other fauna on vintage tennis rackets, the strings acting as her loom. Recently the Cape Town-based artist and designer was commissioned by Vans to embroider four pairs of shoes—a task that lead to kicks decorated with kiwis and pears, Pussy Riot, and a rat seen below.

Clough has also begun to embroider on fences, taking her craft to public arenas such as this years Upfest where she will be completing her first public street art embroidery. You can see more detailed images of her work on her Instagram, and a behind the scenes look at her process on her blog.

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