Craft

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Art Craft

Artist Mimics Japanese 'Kintsugi' Technique to Repair Broken Vases with Embroidery

April 28, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Brighton-based artist Charlotte Bailey was fascinated by the traditional Japanese mending technique called kintsugi, where a broken ceramic object is repaired with gold, silver or platinum, to accentuate the damage and ‘honor’ its history. In this interpretation, Bailey utilizes an embroidery method to reassemble a broken vase—a sort of hybrid between kintsugi and darning with a beautiful result. She first wraps each broken piece in fabric and then uses gold metallic thread to painstakingly patchwork the pieces together. While the process isn’t meant to make the vase functional again, it does produce a striking sculptural object. We’d love to see many more of these. You can follow more of her embroidery work on Facebook.

Update: Artist Zoe Hillyard has been using a similar technique to create ceramic patchwork since 2010.

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Art Craft

A Breathtaking Quilled Paper Carpet and Gospel Book Cover by Lisa Nilsson

April 26, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Jardin, 2016. Japanese mulberry paper, gilt edged paper. 27.5″ x 34.25″ x 2.5″

Working with compact rolls of Japanese mulberry paper in a myriad of colors, artist Lisa Nilsson painstakingly creates anatomical figures and textile patterns using a centuries-old technique called quilling. In her latest artworks Jardine and Gospel, Nilsson was inspired by the patterns of an Islamic carpet and an 8th century gospel cover. The carpet piece alone was nearly 8 months in the making as she created ornate figures of flowers, stars, and other patterns to fill a 27″ by 34″ inch frame, much of which was improvised as she worked outward from the center. For Gospel she in incorporated bright gilt edged paper to mimic the actual gold used for traditional religious book covers.

You can see more views of these artworks on Nilsson’s website, and she was recently intereviewed about the new pieces on All Things Paper.

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Jardin, detail.

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Jardin, detail.

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Jardin, detail.

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Jardin, detail.

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Jardin, detail.

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Gospel, 2016. Japanese mulberry paper, gilt edged paper. 19 3/8″ x 22 3/8″ x 2 3/8″

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Gospel, detail.

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Gospel, detail.

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Gospel, detail.

 

 



Art Craft

Embroidered Psychological Landscapes by Michelle Kingdom

April 18, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Still the sky was blue

LA-based artist Michelle Kingdom continues to impress with her masterful command of thread and needle. Her stitched tableaus and landscapes depict individuals caught in the middle of intriguing yet ambiguous situations like something out of a dream, with characters lost in worlds out of their control or in the process of searching for meaning. She shares about her process:

Decidedly miniature in scale, the scenes are densely embroidered into compressed compositions. While the work acknowledges the luster and lineage inherent in needlework, I use thread as a sketching tool in order to simultaneously honor and undermine this tradition. Beauty parallels melancholy, as conventional stitches acquiesce to the fragile and expressive.

You can explore more of Kingdom’s work on her Tumblr and Instagram. (via Lustik)

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It had already become the past

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Tomorrow will insist

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Because reality takes shape in the memory alone

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Here we can whisper

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Some imagined future

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Promises cannot obscure the sun

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Truth breaks a thousand times

 

 



Art Craft

New Plaster Cast Tiles That Immortalize Flowers and Veggies by Rachel Dein

April 14, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Carrot by Rachel Dein, all images via the artist’s Etsy.

Rachel Dein (previously) chooses to immortalize plants that might otherwise wither away shortly after their appearance in the spring. Dein places theses flowers, vegetables, and foliage in arrangements within clay, making an impression of the plants before applying a layer of plaster. Once hardened, the initial clay is peeled way to reveal a relief formed by the delicate leaves and buds. A silicon rubber mold is then used to cast each tile in plaster using the shades of light white, green, or blue.

Dein sells her botanical work on her Etsy shop, a selection of which will be included in the Chelsea Flower Show this May, and in her first solo exhibition at Hampton Court this July. You can see more of her plant-based tiles on her Instagram.

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Honesty, Lavender, Californian Poppy, Clematis seed head, Salvia and Achillia in Blue Wedgwood

Honesty, Lavender, Californian Poppy, Clematis seed head, Salvia and Achillia in Blue Wedgwood

Snowdrops

Snowdrops

Long Carrot in Emerald Green Wedgwood

Long Carrot in Emerald Green Wedgwood

Cyclamens

Cyclamens

Daisy, Dandelion and Bramble in Blue Wedgwood

Daisy, Dandelion and Bramble in Blue Wedgwood

Grasses

Grasses

Honesty in Blue Wedgwood

Honesty in Blue Wedgwood

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Peas in Duck Egg Blue Wedgwood

 

 



Art Craft

New Rainbow-Hued Origami Street Art by Mademoiselle Maurice

April 13, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Mademoiselle Maurice’s work hanging from the Museum of National Art Singapore, all images via Mademoiselle Maurice.

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Museum of National Art Singapore

It’s been a few years since we last featured French street artist Mademoiselle Maurice (previously here and here) and we were delighted to catch up with her new artfully placed pieces on the streets and buildings of Singapore, Corsica, Sweden, and Italy. Arranged both haphazardly and in detailed arrangements, Mademoiselle Maurice adheres thousands of brightly colored origami works to unexpected places, decorating everything from the ceilings of national art museums to the worn sides of ancient buildings. You can see more of her origami works on her Instagram and Facebook. (via Wooster Collective)

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Malmo, Sweden

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Malmo, Sweden

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Malmo, Sweden

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Porto-Vecchio, Corsica

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Porto-Vecchio, Corsica

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San Potito, Italy

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San Potito, Italy

 

 



Amazing Craft Design

A 150-Year-Old Porcelain Warehouse in Japan Opens for Daily 'Treasure Hunts' for Just $45

April 5, 2016

Johnny Waldman

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The Kouraku Kiln was founded in Arita (Saga Prefecture, Japan) in 1865 and has been producing ceramics for the past 150 years. Over that time the facility has accumulated a vast collection of pottery that has, for one reason or another, gone unsold. The warehouse is so vast that some workers use a bicycle to get from one side to the other. And they’ll be the first to admit that even they don’t really know what’s in there. The production facility is now inviting visitors on a “treasure hunt” to try and get rid of some of their stock.

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Here’s how the treasure hunt works:

— Make your reservation by phone (they only allow 10 people per day)
— Show up at your designated time and select your course and pay: 5,000 yen or 10,000 yen (about $45 to $90)
— Get a 30-min tour of the facility
— Begin your 90-min treasure hunt. You’ll be given a pair of gloves, a flashlight and a basket. You can take home everything you fit in your basket.
— The more expensive course gives you access to a special section of decoratively painted ceramics but both allow you to take home as much as you can fit in your basket. Once done you’ll get to wrap everything up in newspaper so that nothing breaks on your way home.

It sounds like a really fun excursion! They even have an English-speaking staff on hand to assist foreigners.

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(Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

 

 

A Colossal

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Artist Cat Enamel Pins