Craft

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Craft Design

Olympic Athletes Crafted From Layers of Paper by Raya Sader Bujana

April 1, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Barcelona-based paper artist Raya Sader Bujana designed these fantastic serial plane paper figures in collaboration with photographer Garcia Mendez for an Olympic themed stock photography shoot. Each figure is cut from up to 150 pieces of paper joined by hundreds of tiny 3mm separators to create the delicate layering effect. Bujana shares more her process over on All Things Paper and you can see some of her unrelated origami jewelry in her Etsy shop. The photos seen here were shot by Leo García Mendez.

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Art Craft

Explosive Cut Paper Sculptures by Clare Pentlow

March 28, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Image via Ann Martin

Clare Pentlow makes delicate paper look almost dangerous, in the most organized and beautiful way. Cutting hundreds of sharp points into folded layers of paper, Pentlow forms circular designs that mimic the center of exotic flowers. The works are typically composed of a multitude of colors, yet the monochrome pieces do not pale in comparison to their bright companions. You can see more of the London-based artist’s concentric artworks on her Instagram and Twitter.  (via All Things Paper)

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Image courtesy of Clare Pentlow

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Image via Ann Martin

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Image via Ann Martin

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Image via Ann Martin

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Image via Ann Martin

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Image via Ann Martin

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Image via Ann Martin

 

 



Art Craft Design

Vintage Books Transformed Into Layered Rings, Bracelets, and Pendants by Jeremy May

March 28, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Image via RR Gallery

Jewelry maker Jeremy May designs wearable pieces from the layered pages of vintage books, transforming their content into unique works that are nearly impossible to trace back to their paper origin. To make these multi-shaped works, May first laminates hundreds of sheets of paper together. He then creates the shape for the piece, and finishes it off with a high gloss coating. After production, May often inserts the works back into the books, bringing the transformed and colorful pages back to their material source.

Although many of the pieces lose the words and images on the book’s original pages, some preserve hints to the jewelry’s former life in snippets of text or photographs that make it onto the final piece. Each ring or bracelet he produces is formed through a book that May finds inspiring, allowing the jewelry’s content to match its pleasing aesthetic.

The London-based artist is a part of the group exhibition “Read and Worn: Jewelry From Books” at RR Gallery in New York City through April 24. (via My Modern Met)

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Image via Jeremy May

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Image via Jeremy May

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Image via Jeremy May

Image via RR Gallery

Image via RR Gallery

Image via RR Gallery

Image via RR Gallery

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Image via Jeremy May

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Image via Jeremy May

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Image via Jeremy May

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Image via Jeremy May

 

 



Art Craft

'Hikaru Dorodango' is the Japanese Art of Turning Dirt into Perfect Spheres

March 28, 2016

Christopher Jobson

Artist Bruce Gardner is a master of a curious Japanese artform called hikaru dorodango (literally: ‘shiny dumpling’) where regular dirt is slowly crafted into perfect shiny spheres. The objects take several hours make as increasingly finer particles of dirt are applied to create each layer. Depending on the desired effect, a cloth might be used to create apply a fine layer of varnish to give the final outer layer a sheen akin to a billiard ball. Despite their appearance the completed dorodango remain extremely fragile and have to be treated with great care. It seems the purpose of making them might be more focused on the meditative benefits derived from process itself rather than the longevity of the artworks. (via Kottke)

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Art Craft Design Documentary History

Glass: An Oscar-Winning Documentary Short on Dutch Glassblowing from 1958

March 24, 2016

Christopher Jobson

Glass is a 1958 non-verbal documentary short by Bert Haanstra that contrasts glassblowing techniques used inside the Royal Leerdam Glass Factory with more modern industrial machines. The first half shows several men at work using traditional glassblowing to create ornate objects like vases and mugs set against jazz music, while the second part shifts abruptly into the mechanized world of industrial glass production set to a whimsical score of more synthesized music. Also, there’s a ton of great smoking! It’s a really unusual little film that went on to pick up an Oscar for Documentary Short Subject in 1959.

Glass was made available by Aeon as part of their wonderfully curated selection of videos on art, design, culture, and news topics. (via Vimeo)

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Craft

Painstaking Folk Art Papercuts by Suzy Taylor

March 17, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Based in rural Devon, UK, artist Suzy Taylor works with an X-Acto knife and sheets of paper to cut skulls, animals, and entire family trees composed of dense arrays of leaves and flowers. Each piece begins as a complete drawing and is then cut from paper over a period of hours or days. Though many of her designs are original commissions, she also turns much of her work into prints and stationery that are sometimes available from her shop (currently on vacation) and Not On the High Street. You can follow more of her recent work on Instagram. (via Culture N Lifestyle)

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Artist Cat Enamel Pins