Craft

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Craft

Painstaking Folk Art Papercuts by Suzy Taylor

March 17, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Based in rural Devon, UK, artist Suzy Taylor works with an X-Acto knife and sheets of paper to cut skulls, animals, and entire family trees composed of dense arrays of leaves and flowers. Each piece begins as a complete drawing and is then cut from paper over a period of hours or days. Though many of her designs are original commissions, she also turns much of her work into prints and stationery that are sometimes available from her shop (currently on vacation) and Not On the High Street. You can follow more of her recent work on Instagram. (via Culture N Lifestyle)

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Craft

Embroidered Mushrooms, Animals, and Other Forest Creatures by Emillie Ferris

March 7, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Inspired by spring flora and fungus, 21-year-old Emillie Ferris embroiders one-of-a-kind hoops that feature detailed rabbits, foxes, and mushrooms. The works are handstitched and kept on their original frame, drawing the viewer’s attention to the amount of handiwork that went into each animal’s coat or spotted mushroom cap. You can see more of the UK-based artist’s work, including her recent series of custom pet portraits, on her Instagram and Tumblr. (via So Super Awesome)

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Art Craft

Fragile Crocheted Leaf Sculptures by Susanna Bauer

March 2, 2016

Christopher Jobson

Adornment Vl. 29 H x 21 W cm. Magnolia leaf, cotton yarn. All photos courtesy art-photographers.co.uk.

Adornment Vl. 29 H x 21 W cm. Magnolia leaf, cotton yarn. All photos courtesy art-photographers.co.uk.

Working with the rigid edges of large dried magnolia leaves artist Susanna Bauer (previously) adds tiny crocheted embellishments of cotton yarn to create fascinating sculptures that marry the natural and artificial world. The fragility of the medium alone—dry leaves—is enough to cause a double take when first encountering these tiny interventions, and a closer look reveals near perfection in Bauer’s stitching, a near Herculean effort in patience. Many of her pieces are almost shockingly intentional, as if the plants had naturally grown this way, while others are more playful, featuring additions or subtractions that reorganize a regular leaf in unexpected ways.

Seen here are all new sculptures created in the last few months. Bauer currently has work on view in her exhibition titled Leaf Works at The Centre for Contemporary Art and the Natural World through May 26, and will be showing new artworks starting next week at Muriel Guépin Gallery in a show called Natural Order. You can see more on her website.

Aligning. 34.2 H x 26.5 W x 7 D cm. magnolia leaves, cotton yarn.

Aligning (side view). 34.2 H x 26.5 W x 7 D cm. Magnolia leaves, cotton yarn.

Aligning. 34.2 H x 26.5 W x 7 D cm. magnolia leaves, cotton yarn.

Aligning (side view). 34.2 H x 26.5 W x 7 D cm. Magnolia leaves, cotton yarn.

Centered. 38 H x 38 W cm. Platanus leaves, cotton yarn.

Centered. 38 H x 38 W cm. Platanus leaves, cotton yarn.

Four Circles. 38 H x 38 W cm. Magnolia leaves, cotton yarn.

Four Circles. 38 H x 38 W cm. Magnolia leaves, cotton yarn.

Inner Circle. 35.8 H x 25.8 W cm. Magnolia leaves, cotton yarn.

Inner Circle. 35.8 H x 25.8 W cm. Magnolia leaves, cotton yarn.

Inner Circle, detail.

Internal Workings. 35.8 H x 22 W cm. Magnolia leaf, cotton yarn.

Internal Workings. 35.8 H x 22 W cm. Magnolia leaf, cotton yarn.

Moon Vlll. 35.8 H x 22 W cm. Magnolia leaf, cotton yarn.

Moon Vlll. 35.8 H x 22 W cm. Magnolia leaf, cotton yarn.

Moon VIII, detail.

Moon VIII, detail.

Resurgence ll. 38.9 H x 34.8 W x 3.2 D cm. Magnolia leaves, cotton yarn.

Resurgence ll. 38.9 H x 34.8 W x 3.2 D cm. Magnolia leaves, cotton yarn.

Resurgence l, detail.

Resurgence l, detail.

Trans-Plant No.19. 40.2 H x 40.2 W cm. Magnolia leaves, cotton yarn.

Trans-Plant No.19. 40.2 H x 40.2 W cm. Magnolia leaves, cotton yarn.

Susanna in her studio, photo by Rebekah Taylor.

Susanna in her studio, photo by Rebekah Taylor.

 

 



Art Craft Photography

New Knit Wool Electronics and Street Style Classics by Jessica Dance

March 2, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Motorola DynaTAC 8000X 1984, 100% lambswool, photographed by David Sykes, all images courtesy of Jessica Dance

Textile artist and prop stylist Jessica Dance (previously here and here) gives common objects a touch more tangibility, turning electronics and accessories into knit copies of themselves with 100% lambswool. Previously working to transform food into fuzzy replicas, she is now focused on vintage computers and Nike kicks which she refers to as Vintage Knits, and Vintage Flufftronics.

Her new pieces were photographed by food photographer David Sykes to give the appearance of being shot for a glossy magazine. Dance’s works sit in front of colorful backgrounds, their wooly exterior contrasting the sleek method in which they were shot.

Dance’s new series of knit objects will be on display at The Spring Knitting and Stitching Show in Olympia London from March 3 through 6. You can read about and view more of Dance’s work and progress on her blog and Twitter. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Apple Macintosh 128k 1984, 100% lambswool, photographed by David Sykes

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Sony Walkman TPS L2 1979, 100% lambswool, photographed by David Sykes

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Nike Dunk High NL Undefeated, 100% lambswool, photographed by David Sykes

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Gettry x Medicom Burger Bearbrick, 100% lambswool, photographed by David Sykes

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Louis Vuitton beauty trunk, 100% lambswool, photographed by David Sykes

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Woollery, 100% lambswool, photographed by David Sykes

 

 



Craft Food

Mesmerizing Embroidery-Inspired Cookie Decorating by Mezesmanna

March 1, 2016

Christopher Jobson

Chef Judit Czinkné Poór is the mastermind behind Hungarian cake decorating shop Mézesmanna, a small studio with a giant social media presence because of the incredible photos and videos they share of their decorative confections. Nearly everything they produce falls into the ‘looks too good to eat’ category, from elaborate illustrations of animals, to intricate patterns inspired by embroidery. Seen here is a quick video of her ‘royal icing’ technique. You can see even more here. (thnx, Larry)

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Craft Illustration

New Pressed Fern, Algae, and Gold Leaf Illustrations by Helen Ahpornsiri

February 26, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Artist Helen Ahpornsiri (previously) continues to explore the possibilities of pressed plantlife in her ongoing series of wildlife illustrations that depict insects, animals, and other creatures. The England-based artist has recently begun experimenting with gold leaf that she applies to ferns and then incorporates as accents into various pieces. You can see more on her website, on Instagram, and through her shop. (via the Instagram Blog)

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