Craft

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Art Craft

Decaying Animal Skeletons Crocheted From String by Artist Caitlin McCormack

July 17, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

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Caitlin McCormack creates crocheted animals that appear to decay in front of your eyes, delicate corpses crafted from cotton string and glue. To produce each of her sculptures she must stiffen the string which produces a consistency similar to the bone tissue of the animals she is recreating. These fragile remains appear extremely macabre, a typically cute hobby made somewhat morbid.

Documented on dark backgrounds, the details of her creations are all the more apparent, string dangling from bits of the animals’s arms and wings as if it was truly decomposing. By using a technique inherited from her deceased relatives McCormack says she “aim[s] to generate emblems of my diminishing bloodline, embodied by each organism’s skeletal remains.”

McCormack studied Illustration at the University of Fine Arts in Philadelphia, PA. Her work will be featured within Opus Hypnagogia: Sacred Spaces of the Visionary and Vernacular at The Morbid Anatomy Museum in Brooklyn, New York which runs through October 15th. (via Laughing Squid and Beautiful Decay)

World Before the World, 2014

World Before the World, 2014

World Before the World II, 2014

World Before the World II, 2014

Bound, As It Were, 2015

Bound, As It Were, 2015

Mothering, 2015

Mothering, 2015

Ghost, 2014

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Crawlspace, 2014

Crawlspace, 2014

The Organist, 2013

The Organist, 2013

 

 



Amazing Animation Art Craft

Fantastic Embroidered Zoetrope Animations on Turntables by Elliot Schultz

July 14, 2015

Christopher Jobson

If there’s one thing we can’t get enough of on Colossal it’s zoetropes, a filmless animation technique that relies on a rotating sequence of images or objects that’s photographed or displayed with a strobe light to create the illusion of motion. We’ve seen a few different takes on the medium from chocolate to 3D printing to ceramics to my all-time favorite the turntable phonotrope. For his degree project at the ANU School of Art in Australia, digital artist Elliot Schultz devised his own method: the Embroidered Zoetrope.

The 2013 installation involved the creation of 10″ discs embroidered with sequences of images that fit on standard turntables. Each piece was displayed with a standard strobe light that effectively brought the animation to life. The precision of the machine embroidery coupled with the texture of thread makes these really special to watch. He shares about the project:

Inspired by the work of Alexandre Alexeieff and Claire Parker, I aimed to guide my production process indirectly through the limitations afforded by alternative media. Their invention, the pin screen, was used as the sole medium in the production of six short films, and shaped the outcome of their work. In response, I have designed and embroidered animated sequences onto discs, similar to the Phenakistokope, Zoopraxiscope and Stamfer Disc layouts. This repurposing of media introduced strict parameters, namely spatial, tonal and temporal, and has greatly informed all stages of my process.

Watch the video above to see Schultz’s animations in action, and you can see a nicely presented project view of the embroidered zoetrope over on Behance.

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Photo by Dylan Kovacevic

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Photo by Dylan Kovacevic

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Craft Illustration

New Densely Embroidered Animals by Chloe Giordano

July 6, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Embroidery artist Chloe Giordano (previously) continues to evolve her extraordinary talents with needle and thread in these latest stitched illustrations of small animals. Embracing her background as a traditional illustrator, Giordano is able to layer countless different thread colors as one might do with pencils. The Oxford-based artist is very open about her techniques and often fields questions on her Tumblr. Her latest piece, Sleeping Hare, is currently available through Light Grey Art Lab.

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Art Craft

Delicate Pencil Lead Sculptures Carved by Salavat Fidai

July 4, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Starting with carpenter and art pencils containing thick leads, Russian artist Salavat Fidai uses an X-ACTO knife to carve miniature renderings of hands, buildings, and various characters from pop culture. The delicate process requires a good understanding of how much pressure the lead can withstand, but even then mistakes are inevitable. The Ufa-based artist is fascinated by all things miniature, and also paints on seeds and matchboxes. Watch the timelapse below to see his process for carving an entire replica of the Eiffel Tower.

You can follow Fidai on Instagram, and some of his pieces occasionally end up in his shop. If you liked this, also check out pencil carvings by Diem Chau and Dalton Ghetti.

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Craft

Handmade Ceramic Animal Planters by Cumbuca Chic

July 2, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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If you’ve been on the hunt for the perfect ceramic capybara planter, look no further. Ceramicist Priscilla Ramos from São Paulo, Brazil, has a fantastic line of animal planters in the form of foxes, whales, anteaters, and yes, even the world’s largest rodent. She’s even working on a sloth! The handmade stoneware pieces are perfect for small succulents or cacti, and you can see more in her shop: Cumbuca Chic. (via NOTCOT)

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Craft Design

New Japanese Floral Hair Ornaments Handcrafted from Resin by Sakae

July 1, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Working with liquid synthetic resin and wire, Japanese artist Sakae (previously) crafts these ornate bunches of translucent flowers worn as hair sculptural hair ornaments called kanzashi. Kanzashi were traditionally made from small pieces of folded cloth, but have since evolved into a number of different mediums. Each of Sakae’s pins are one-of-kind, requiring anywhere from a few days to a month to fabricate, and due to extraordinarily high demand she chooses to put each piece up for auction through an announcement on her website and Facebook page (usually selling for several thousand dollars). You can see her most recent pieces on Pinterest.

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