Craft

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Craft Illustration

Family Portraits Illustrated with Paper by Jotaká

August 6, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Spanish illustrator Juan Carlos aka Jotaka created this fantastic series of paper family portraits by rendering his bendy illustrated characters in cut paper. Titled La siesta, he describes the images as “a personal project about hugs, the importance and the ideal time to receive them.” Some of these are available as prints in his shop, and he regularly updates a blog here. (via Behance)

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Craft Design

Artist James Merry Embellishes Sportswear Logos with Embroidered Plants

August 5, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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As part of a recent series of embroideries, artist James Merry softened the bold logos of sportswear companies by adding stitched flora to vintage clothing. For instance a glacier flower and moss grow from an old Nike sweatshirt, and a FILA logo is topped by a mushroom cap. Merry is a longtime collaborator with Björk and creates many of her extravagant costumes for stage and music videos, and you can read a recent interview with him over on i-D. (via Quipsologies, Booooooom)

 

 



Art Craft

Jay Mohler Updates the Traditional Craft of Homespun God’s Eyes to Create Elaborate Masterpieces up to 48 Inches Wide

July 23, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

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Far more than just popsicle sticks and yarn, Jay Mohler‘s Ojos de Dios or “God’s Eye” mandalas update the craft often seen at sleepaway camps and elementary classrooms. Upwards of 15 colors of yarn are included in his elaborate mandalas, producing pieces that span up to 48 inches in diameter.

Mohler has been crafting Ojos de Dios since 1966, inspired by both Huichol natives of Mexico, and monks from Tibet. The Asheville, North Carolina-based artist began making 8-sided pieces when they grew in popularity as folk art in the 1970’s American Southwest, selling them at tourist gift shops around Albuquerque, New Mexico. Most recently Mohler has been producing 12-sided works that he recognizes as potentially spiritual objects, but explains, “I create these for artistic satisfaction rather than as any sort of spiritual talisman.”

Not only does Mohler sell his own elaborate pieces, but he also creates DIY kits for fans to make their own work. You can buy both his finished pieces and kits on his Etsy page and find detailed instructions for making your own mandalas here. (via The Jealous Curator)

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Art Craft

Decaying Animal Skeletons Crocheted From String by Artist Caitlin McCormack

July 17, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

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Caitlin McCormack creates crocheted animals that appear to decay in front of your eyes, delicate corpses crafted from cotton string and glue. To produce each of her sculptures she must stiffen the string which produces a consistency similar to the bone tissue of the animals she is recreating. These fragile remains appear extremely macabre, a typically cute hobby made somewhat morbid.

Documented on dark backgrounds, the details of her creations are all the more apparent, string dangling from bits of the animals’s arms and wings as if it was truly decomposing. By using a technique inherited from her deceased relatives McCormack says she “aim[s] to generate emblems of my diminishing bloodline, embodied by each organism’s skeletal remains.”

McCormack studied Illustration at the University of Fine Arts in Philadelphia, PA. Her work will be featured within Opus Hypnagogia: Sacred Spaces of the Visionary and Vernacular at The Morbid Anatomy Museum in Brooklyn, New York which runs through October 15th. (via Laughing Squid and Beautiful Decay)

World Before the World, 2014

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World Before the World II, 2014

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Bound, As It Were, 2015

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Amazing Animation Art Craft

Fantastic Embroidered Zoetrope Animations on Turntables by Elliot Schultz

July 14, 2015

Christopher Jobson

If there’s one thing we can’t get enough of on Colossal it’s zoetropes, a filmless animation technique that relies on a rotating sequence of images or objects that’s photographed or displayed with a strobe light to create the illusion of motion. We’ve seen a few different takes on the medium from chocolate to 3D printing to ceramics to my all-time favorite the turntable phonotrope. For his degree project at the ANU School of Art in Australia, digital artist Elliot Schultz devised his own method: the Embroidered Zoetrope.

The 2013 installation involved the creation of 10″ discs embroidered with sequences of images that fit on standard turntables. Each piece was displayed with a standard strobe light that effectively brought the animation to life. The precision of the machine embroidery coupled with the texture of thread makes these really special to watch. He shares about the project:

Inspired by the work of Alexandre Alexeieff and Claire Parker, I aimed to guide my production process indirectly through the limitations afforded by alternative media. Their invention, the pin screen, was used as the sole medium in the production of six short films, and shaped the outcome of their work. In response, I have designed and embroidered animated sequences onto discs, similar to the Phenakistokope, Zoopraxiscope and Stamfer Disc layouts. This repurposing of media introduced strict parameters, namely spatial, tonal and temporal, and has greatly informed all stages of my process.

Watch the video above to see Schultz’s animations in action, and you can see a nicely presented project view of the embroidered zoetrope over on Behance.

 

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Photo by Dylan Kovacevic

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Craft Illustration

New Densely Embroidered Animals by Chloe Giordano

July 6, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Embroidery artist Chloe Giordano (previously) continues to evolve her extraordinary talents with needle and thread in these latest stitched illustrations of small animals. Embracing her background as a traditional illustrator, Giordano is able to layer countless different thread colors as one might do with pencils. The Oxford-based artist is very open about her techniques and often fields questions on her Tumblr. Her latest piece, Sleeping Hare, is currently available through Light Grey Art Lab.

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