Dance

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Animation Dance

An In-Your-Face Motion Capture Dance Performance Amidst a Flurry of Feathers, Fur, and Particles

June 10, 2016

Christopher Jobson

This three minute dance performance was created by Method Studios for this year’s AICP Awards as a way to promote different sponsors. Each sponsor is imagined briefly as a dancing avatar rendered with the help of motion capture, procedural animation and dynamic simulations. The wild costumes seem to draw inspiration from artists like Nick Cave, Wrecking Crew Orchestra, and even Kohei Nawa. To be sure, there’s a lot going on here, but all of it adds up to something pretty amazing, a killer dance performance that merges cutting edge animation techniques. (via Vimeo)

 

 



Animation Art Dance

The Physics of Kung Fu Brought to Life Through Motion Capture Visualizations

May 2, 2016

Christopher Jobson

We’ve all seen exaggerated depictions of kung fu in movies or maybe a demonstration by a practitioner in real life, but German digital artist Tobias Gremmler decided to portray the Chinese martial art in an entirely new light through the use of motion capture. By capturing the motion of different sequences Gremmler is able to distill the data into these animated sculptures, effectively turning movement into structure and volume. The motion of limbs is turned into a complex moving scaffold or interpreted as dramatic bursts of particles, the visuals used to seemingly isolate the physics of kung fu. If you enjoyed this also check out films like Asphyxia, Walking City, and these similar idents for CCTV. (via The Creator’s Project, Prosthetic Knowledge)

 

 



Animation Art Dance

A Gorgeous Rotoscoped Music Video Created from 1,200 Hand-Painted Frames

March 14, 2016

Christopher Jobson

This new music video for composer Ralf Hildenbeutel's track Disco was created from over 1,200 individually hand-painted frames. Directed by Boris Seewald, the clip uses an animation technique called rotoscoping to turn the real-life movements of dancers Althea Corlett and Simone Schmidt into a series of drawings and paintings to make each scene. Despite the wild variety of mediums and techniques used in the hundreds of sketches, the frame to frame continuity almost serves to enhance and accentuate the motions of the dancers.

Rotoscoping is a form of animation where live video is translated into hand-drawn animation stills with the help of a projector or transparencies. Some more notable examples from pop culture include several scenes from both of Disney’s Snow White and Peter Pan, or the 1984 music video for Ah Ha’s Take On Me.

Disco was animated by Boris, Mina, and Mihwa Seewald, and filmed by Georg Simbeni. (via Vimeo Staff Picks)

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Dance

The Movement of Air: A New Dance Performance Incorporating Interactive Digital Projection from Adrien M & Claire B

November 11, 2015

Christopher Jobson

Artist duo Adrien M & Claire B have lifted the curtain on their latest acrobatic dance performance utilizing digital projection titled The Movement of Air. Seen in this video is a handful of moments taken from an hour-long piece performed in France last month by a trio dancers. Unlike more common uses of digital project mapping where a recorded animation or scene is projected in a space, Adrien M & Claire B instead utilize fully interactive “scenes” that respond to human interaction. Nothing you see on the set is animated beforehand.

“This ‘living light’ is produced by video projectors and generated in real time by a set of algorithms,” Adrien shares with us. “It is a mix of control room operated human interventions and onstage data sensors that outlines a precise writing of motions and generative behaviors. Thus, the images are never pre-recorded for a rigid show on an imposed rhythm: on the contrary, they breathe and move with the dancers and organize a new space for them to explore.”

The overall effect is dizzying, and in many ways enhances the dancer’s work instead of looking like a gimmick added as an afterthought. A great marriage of physical performance and digital special effects. You can watch several earlier interactive creations by Adrien & Claire here on Colossal including Pixel and Kinetic Sand.

RESIDENCE CREATION CIE AM-CBADRIEN MONDOT / CLAIRE BARDAINNELE MOUVEMENT DE L AIRTHEATRE DE L ARCHIPEL / SCENE NATIONALEPERPIGNAN 01/02 OCTBORE 2015.

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Craft Dance

Transport a Miniature Garden by Bike or Necklace with Colleen Jordan’s 3D Printed Planters

April 9, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

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Colleen Jordan’s Easter egg-hued vases are the perfect springtime accessory. Built in miniature, her creations are sized to carry small succulents or pocket-sized flower arrangements on one’s neckline, lapel, finger, or bicycle handle. The Atlanta-based designer and artist recently made Wearable Planter her full time gig, and each piece is influenced by the many places she has lived—including Sweden, Hawaii, and South Carolina. Jordan explains that through her business she strives to “create things to make life more pleasant.”

Each planter is 3D printed out of nylon and dyed individually. The planters are also sealed with acrylic varnish to keep out rain and maintain their bright color. Most of the vessels are designed with a flat bottom so they can also decorate your table or desk while not being worn. Jordan’s tiny planters can be purchased via her Etsy, and other crafts and miscellanea can be viewed on the Wearable Planter Instagram. (via iGNANT)

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Art Dance Design

Asphyxia: A Striking Fusion of Dance and Motion Capture Technology

March 9, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Asphyxia is an experimental film project by Maria Takeuchi and Frederico Phillips that explores human movement through motion capture technology. The team used two inexpensive Xbox One Kinect sensors to capture the movements of dancer Shiho Tanaka and then rendered the data inside a near photo-realistic environment. From their description of the project:

The project is an effort to explore new ways to use and/or combine technologies and different fields in an experiment without many of the common commercial limitations. The performance is centered in an eloquent choreography that stresses the desire to be expressive without bounds.

Motion data was captured using inexpensive sensors and that data paved the way through an extensive number of steps. Once all the scanned point cloud data was combined, that was then used as the base for the creative development on the piece. A series of iterative studies on styles followed and several techniques and dynamic simulations were then applied using a number 3D tools for various results.

You can see a making of video here. If you liked this you might also enjoy Walking City, Choros, or these 2013 idents for CCTV. (via Prosthetic Knowledge)

 

 



Art Dance

New Three-Dimensional Figurative Collages Encased in Multiple Layers of Glass by Dustin Yellin

February 17, 2015

Johnny Strategy

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

The Brooklyn-based artist Dustin Yellin (previously) was commissioned by the New York City Ballet to install a new series of his figurative collages. The artist refers to the sculptures as Psychogeographies because “they feel like maps of the psyche.”

Each large-scale sculpture is individually embellished with bizarre found objects—cut-up books, magazines and trash found on the street—which are then sealed within layers of glass. “Imagine if you were to make a drawing on a window,” said Yellin, explaining his process. “And then you were to take another window and glue it to that window… until you had a window sandwich. I make window sandwiches.”

The resulting forms resemble dancers striking various poses: their multi-dimensional bodies encapsulated in suspended animation. A grand total of 15 of these “window sandwiches,” each weighing in at 3,000 pounds each, were installed in the atrium of the David H. Koch Theater at Lincoln Center. The installation is on view for all performances through March 1, 2015 but there’s also free public viewing through February 22. If you can’t make it you can always follow Yellin’s activities on Instagram.

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

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