Dance

Section



Craft Dance

Transport a Miniature Garden by Bike or Necklace with Colleen Jordan’s 3D Printed Planters

April 9, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

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Colleen Jordan’s Easter egg-hued vases are the perfect springtime accessory. Built in miniature, her creations are sized to carry small succulents or pocket-sized flower arrangements on one’s neckline, lapel, finger, or bicycle handle. The Atlanta-based designer and artist recently made Wearable Planter her full time gig, and each piece is influenced by the many places she has lived—including Sweden, Hawaii, and South Carolina. Jordan explains that through her business she strives to “create things to make life more pleasant.”

Each planter is 3D printed out of nylon and dyed individually. The planters are also sealed with acrylic varnish to keep out rain and maintain their bright color. Most of the vessels are designed with a flat bottom so they can also decorate your table or desk while not being worn. Jordan’s tiny planters can be purchased via her Etsy, and other crafts and miscellanea can be viewed on the Wearable Planter Instagram. (via iGNANT)

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Art Dance Design

Asphyxia: A Striking Fusion of Dance and Motion Capture Technology

March 9, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Asphyxia is an experimental film project by Maria Takeuchi and Frederico Phillips that explores human movement through motion capture technology. The team used two inexpensive Xbox One Kinect sensors to capture the movements of dancer Shiho Tanaka and then rendered the data inside a near photo-realistic environment. From their description of the project:

The project is an effort to explore new ways to use and/or combine technologies and different fields in an experiment without many of the common commercial limitations. The performance is centered in an eloquent choreography that stresses the desire to be expressive without bounds.

Motion data was captured using inexpensive sensors and that data paved the way through an extensive number of steps. Once all the scanned point cloud data was combined, that was then used as the base for the creative development on the piece. A series of iterative studies on styles followed and several techniques and dynamic simulations were then applied using a number 3D tools for various results.

You can see a making of video here. If you liked this you might also enjoy Walking City, Choros, or these 2013 idents for CCTV. (via Prosthetic Knowledge)

 

 



Art Dance

New Three-Dimensional Figurative Collages Encased in Multiple Layers of Glass by Dustin Yellin

February 17, 2015

Johnny Waldman

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

The Brooklyn-based artist Dustin Yellin (previously) was commissioned by the New York City Ballet to install a new series of his figurative collages. The artist refers to the sculptures as Psychogeographies because “they feel like maps of the psyche.”

Each large-scale sculpture is individually embellished with bizarre found objects—cut-up books, magazines and trash found on the street—which are then sealed within layers of glass. “Imagine if you were to make a drawing on a window,” said Yellin, explaining his process. “And then you were to take another window and glue it to that window… until you had a window sandwich. I make window sandwiches.”

The resulting forms resemble dancers striking various poses: their multi-dimensional bodies encapsulated in suspended animation. A grand total of 15 of these “window sandwiches,” each weighing in at 3,000 pounds each, were installed in the atrium of the David H. Koch Theater at Lincoln Center. The installation is on view for all performances through March 1, 2015 but there’s also free public viewing through February 22. If you can’t make it you can always follow Yellin’s activities on Instagram.

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

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Dance

Pixel: A Mesmerizing Dance Performance Incorporating Interactive Digital Projection

January 2, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Pixel is an innovative dance performance conceived by French performance artists Adrien Mondot and Claire Bardainne, known collectively as the Adrien M / Claire B Company, in collaboration with hip-hop choreographer Cie Kafig. The hour-long performance incorporates a host of digital projection mapping techniques, 11 dancers, and bills itself as “a work on illusion combining energy and poetry, fiction and technical achievement, hip hop and circus.” Pixel premiered at Maison des Arts de Créteil on November 15th of last year, and above is a 3-minute excerpt of the shows most jaw-dropping moments. (via Jason Sondhi)

 

 



Dance

Waltz on the Walls: An Aerial Dance Performance on the Side of Oakland’s City Hall

September 22, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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This surprisingly lovely dance performance was filmed vertically on the side of Oakland’s 18-story City Hall building earlier this month at the Art + Soul Festival. The dancers are Amelia Rudolph and Roel Seeber from Bandaloop. (via The Awesomer)

 

 



Dance Design

An Interactive Dancing Pedestrian Signal by Smart

September 17, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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This fun urban intervention from small car manufacturer Smart attempts to redesign the humble traffic light by making it a bit more interactive. The team built a nearby dancing booth rigged with cameras that translates the dance moves of real passersby into a pixelated ‘don’t walk’ silhouette inside a crosswalk light. The video claims the installation resulted in 81% more people stopping at the light instead of walking out into the street. The piece was created for Smart’s promotional/safety campaign titled WhatAreYouFOR. (via Designboom)

 

 



Art Dance

Dance Through an Abandoned Warehouse Filled with Hundreds of Swinging Pendulums

May 11, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Victor Frankowski / Brighton Festival

World-renowned choreographer and artist William Forsythe (previously) has just unveiled his latest “choreographic object,” an old municipal market space filled with hundreds of suspended pendulums that swing in timed sequences. As visitors move through the space they are forced to duck, dodge, and dart through the rows of swinging weights (technically plumbobs) resulting in an impromptu dance. Forsythe is known for his unique blend of choreography and artwork where the viewer often becomes a participant in his interactive installations.

Titled “Nowhere and Everywhere at the Same Time No. 2,” the exhibition is located at Circus Street Market as part of the Brighton Festival, an annual arts festival in England. Stop by and you can practice your advanced avoidance strategies for free through May 25, 2014. Film by Shy Camera. (via My Modern Met)

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Victor Frankowski / Brighton Festival

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Victor Frankowski / Brighton Festival

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Victor Frankowski / Brighton Festival

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