Design

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Design Music

Collect Sounds Like Fireflies in the 'Re: Sound Bottle,' a Device that Creates Your Own Personal Soundtrack

December 28, 2012

Christopher Jobson

The Re: Sound Bottle is the audio equivalent of running around in a field in the summer collecting fireflies in a jar. Designed by Jun Fujiwara from Tama Art University, the bottle is simple in its usage but absurdly complex in its design which relies heavily on software to handle the recording, storing, and playback of audio tracks. To use it you simply uncork the device and if sound is present it immediately snaps into recording mode. As you record more individual sounds, an audio database is formed and tracks are automatically selected to create rhythmic tracks, essentially like a miniature robot DJ in a jar. To listen, you again uncork the top and wait for your personal soundtrack to play. Jun says he hopes the Re: Sound Bottle (still just a concept) will help people interact more directly with music by recording the audio from their daily life. The bottle won a special judge’s prize at the 2012 Mitsubishi Chemical Junior Designer Awards earlier this year. (via jason sondhi)

 

 

 



Art Design

An Underwater Bonsai Tree by Makoto Azuma

December 27, 2012

Christopher Jobson

In his continued forays into experimental botany that blur the lines between art and science, artist Makoto Azuma (previously) has reimagined the bonsai tree, one of the oldest Japanese artforms. This latest work titled Water and Bonsai, began with a dead branch from a juniper tree which was carefully attached to java moss meant to simulate the form of leaves. The entire piece was then submerged into a modified hydroponic environment similar to some of his earlier aquatic plantscapes replete with LEDs, a filtration system, and C02 emissions that encourage photosynthesis. See more over on Spoon & Tamago.

 

 



Design

A Glow-in-the-Dark Full Moon Cabinet

December 22, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Designed by Sotirios Papadopoulos the Full Moon is a beautifully designed credenza with an overlaid photo-realistic treatment of the moon that glows in the dark, an effect achieved by an eco-friendly luminous surface developed by Papadopoulos (the image above appears to be a rendering and may not be the actual piece). The furniture is available online through Generate LE. (via laughing squid)

 

 



Art Design

Firewall: An Interactive Fabric Surface by Aaron Sherwood

December 20, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Firewall is a new interactive artwork by New York media artist Aaron Sherwood created in collaboration with Michael Allison. The presentation is relatively straightforward but still visually stunning: different ‘modes’ of light are projected onto a taut membrane of spandex which then reacts kinetically in response to touch. Firewall was made using Processing, Max/MSP, Arduino and a Kinect that work in tandem to create the experience and will be used in an upcoming performance art piece involving dancer Kiori Kawai who will interact with the piece on stage. Learn more over on Sherwood’s blog. (via designboom)

 

 



Art Design

Origami Mosaics by Kota Hiratsuka

December 19, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Japanese paper engineer Kota Hiratsuka has been creating beautifully complex origami mosaics that rely on cut and folded geometric patterns. He plans to sell the various templates as downloadable PDFs through his website …though not just yet, so stay tuned. See many more of his works here and on Flickr. If you liked this also check out the work of Matthew Shlian.

 

 



Art Design

The Happiness Machine: Exquisitely Detailed Architectural Drawings by Mark Lascelles Thornton

December 11, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Using a rotring pen on white paper, Cornwall-based artist Mark Lascelles Thornton has embarked on a massive architectural drawing project called the The Happiness Machine. Each panel represents a stylized red and grayscale representation of architectural highlights from eight locations, so far including Chicago, New York, London and what appears to be a mix of Asian skyscrapers (Taipei, Kuala Lumpur, etc.). In addition to the meticulous detail of the buildings and clouds, the piece is all the more incredible considering its scale: the final piece will include eight panels spanning 8 ft. by 5 ft. (2.4 m. x 1.5 m.). The images here are great but you can see everything in much more detail over on his Tumblr.