Design

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Art Design

Contact 1: A 200,000 Piece Sci-Fi LEGO Masterwork by Mike Doyle

April 2, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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From the brilliant mind of New Jersey artist Mike Doyle (I’ve previously featured his spooky victorian houses), comes Contact 1 the first in a series of grand scale LEGO works “celebrating extra terrestrial contact events, spiritual beings and unique worlds.” The towering world is the culmination of some 600 hours of work using 200,000 individual bricks and stands nearly 5 feet high by six feet wide. Doyle is offering limited edition prints and DIY instructions on how to create individual portions of Contact 1 over on Kickstarter.

 

 



Design

Minimalist Split Wood Lights and Sculptures by Split Grain

March 28, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Paul Foeckler over at LA-based Split Grain is making some pretty stunning lights and other sculptures using pieces of California cypress trees. The artist says each light can involve up to 100 hours of labor as he selects the right section of wood, slices, sands, and reassembles each piece. See several more of his recent pieces over on Etsy. (via take over time)

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Art Design

Irving Harper: Works in Paper

March 24, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Irving Harper: Works In Paper is a new book from Skira Rizzoli that collects the paper works of industrial designer Irving Harper. Harper worked as the director of design at George Nelson Associates during the 1960s and is known for designing the Marshmallow Sofa for Herman Miller (as well as the firms’ iconic logo) and the ball and sunburst clocks for Howard Miller. Privately the designer was also an artist and created numerous paper sculptures depicting animals, masks, and other figures. Via Rizzoli:

Encompassing influences as diverse as Picasso, Egyptian hieroglyphs, the art of Oceana and Africa, the architecture of Paris, and the American beech tree that shades the Rye, New York home he has lived in for over 50 years, the artist’s private meditations reveal an informed aesthetic consciousness expressing itself as pure joy. Harper’s private work delivers on the promise of modernism: humble materials elevated by brilliant design and craftsmanship, and integrating the natural world to create objects in a universally understood language.

You can pick up the book directly from Rizzoli. All images courtesy Skira Rizzoli. (via grain edit)

 

 



Art Design

Good Vibrations: An Intricately Carved Cabinet Looks Like a Digital Glitch [Updated: It’s a 3D Rendering of an Upcoming Piece]

March 14, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Don’t adjust your web browser, this isn’t a corrupted photograph of a fine piece of Italian furniture (although it may unfortunately be a digital rending, read below). In actuality this cabinet was created by architect Ferruccio Laviani to look just as you see it, like a wavy digital glitch. Titled the Good Vibrations Storage Unit the piece will first appear at Italy’s annual interior show Fratelli Boffi. I’d love to see it from a few different angles, but incredible nonetheless. (via mocoloco)

Update: There has been a healthy amount of skepticism whether or not this is the real deal or a 3D rendering. Having not stood in front of the piece myself I guess we can only defer to the design firm and hope more images of the piece are released soon. One person wrote in to point out that there may be evidence in the photo itself of a repeating pattern which would be the telltale mark of a digitally rendered image. More if I find out.

Update: According to Studio Laviani the image is a rendering, however a final piece of furniture is supposed to be on display in April, so stay tuned.

 

 



Art Design

It’s Not What You Think, Every Single One of these Objects is Made of Paper

March 7, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Bergère / 2012 / Various papers / 26 x 26 x 36 in.

A dusty old chair, a wrinkled pair of jean shorts, or the classic shape of a wooden Eames chair, common items you might encounter every day without giving them a second thought. But try to sit on that worn Corbusier bench or wear that pressed white shirt and you might be shocked as they tear or disintegrate before your very eyes because, amazingly, they are made almost completely with paper by Los Angeles-based artist Vincent Tomczyk. Via his artist statement:

My art centers on objects to stimulate visceral connections. These compositions represent biographies of people, experiences and interpretations of intangible ideas. Although my work can be categorized as realism, my intention is to distill the emotion of an object, then through expression, reconstruct it into my view of its essential self – free of function. […] As an artist working primarily with paper, my art requires me to be part craftsman and part engineer. I learned a lot about how to construct things by working at my father’s side, in his workshop. I’m compelled to produce work that is visually poetic by using a medium that defies perceived limitations.

Tomczyk tells me that he doesn’t do much sketching before he embarks on each artwork, but spends his time formulating ideas in his head and developing a list of needed materials and measurements. The objects are carefully crafted by hand, all of the colors you see are hand-painted and he never relies on any sort of digital printing. Translation: these take a lot of time. The jean shorts alone with functional pockets and realistic textures took over 100 hours.

If you want to see more, Tomczyk has a solo show opening May 4th, 2013 at Gallery 825 in LA and you can also see many more of his paper works on his website. If you enjoy this kind of realism, also check out Randall Rosenthall’s wood carvings.

 

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Shirt & Tie / 2010 / Mulberry and various other papers / 23 x 30 x 4 in.

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Wallet / 2011 / Paper, nylon thread / 4 x 3 x 0.5 in.

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Paper Museum Bench / 2013

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Americana, paper jeans / 2011 / Paper, canvas, silk and nylon thread / 15 x 9 x 11 in.

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Americana, paper jeans / 2011 / Paper, canvas, silk and nylon thread / 15 x 9 x 11 in.

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Paper Eames Chair LCW / 2012 / Various papers, hand painted / 22 x 23 x 28 in.

 

 



Design

The Port Vieux Pavilion: A Mirrored Canopy Constructed on a French Wharf

March 5, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Recently unveiled in Marseille, France this giant mirrored canopy called the Port Vieux Pavilion was designed by architecture firm Foster + Partners. The pavilion measures nearly 150 feet (46 meters) long and is made of highly polished stainless steel meant to reflect people and the surrounding environment of Marseille’s World Heritage-listed harbor. The project is somewhat analogous to Anish Kapoor’s Cloud Gate here in Chicago and based on these photos I have no doubt the canopy will be a huge draw for tourists and locals alike. (via designboom)