Design

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Design

The Augmented Reality Sandbox

May 6, 2012

Christopher Jobson

While I truly appreciate the need for any kid to get dirty in a sandbox or let their imagination run wild in a field of mud puddles (something I was doing myself only an hour ago), I love to see how technology like a Kinect 3D camera can create new interactive environments and games. Case in point this new augmented reality sandbox designed by Oliver Kreylos out of U.C. Davis that projects a real-time colored topographic map complete with contour lines onto the surface of the sand while you manipulate it. The system even allows you to pour virtual water on your creation and interact with it in real time. It’s not hard to imagine switching the entire system to volcano mode, or using the projection in some sort of three dimensional toy battlefield. Gah!

According to Krelos’ YouTube page, the project was funded by the National Science Foundation with the hopes of installing these systems as exhibits at science museums like the Lawrence Hall of Science or the Tahoe Environmental Research Center. See another demo of this 21st century sandbox here. (via reddit)

 

 

 



Art Design

Stitched Portrait Project by Evelin Kasikov

May 4, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Master of embroidery Evelin Kasikov recently began a new project involving cross stitched portraits. Using an identical grid, each image is created using a mix of geometric stitching styles and thread of varying color and thickness that results in these beautifully pixelated faces. See the before photos and other process shots over on her Portrait Project page where she’s posting a new work each week. (via the jealous curator)

 

 



Amazing Design

A Postcard Writing Rube Goldberg Machine in a Suitcase

May 1, 2012

Christopher Jobson

As the sun regrettably sets on the art of letter writing, the inventive folks at design studio HEYHEYHEY have pieced together a clever contraption that promises to keep the art of travel postcards a thing of the present. Kind of. Melvin the Traveling Mini Machine is an elaborate Rube Goldberg machine that fits in a pair of suitcases that executes the simple task of “writing” and stamping a postcard of your choice, that is, if the absurdly elaborate sequence of steps goes off without a hitch. Whether or not these suitcases will make it through TSA remains to be seen. The piece is a sequel to a much larger device from early last year by a similar name, Melvin the Magical Mixed Media Machine. (via core77)

 

 

 



Design

A Bathroom Situated Atop a 15-Story Elevator Shaft

April 27, 2012

Christopher Jobson

While not particularly the fine art you might be accustomed to on Colossal, it was impossible to pass this up. Guadalajara-based architects Hernandez Silva Arquitectos recently designed the interior of a new penthouse situated on top of a 1970s Mexican colonial building in Guadalajara, México. A notable feature of the home is a powder room situated atop an unused 15-story elevator shaft. Via Hernandez Silva Arquitectos:

A characteristic feature of the project is that a volume that was originally intended for a second elevator and was never installed becomes a powder room with a glass floor that looks down all the 15 levels, the PPDG penthouse is a great versatile modulated space, with great views all this with the concepts of transparency and the simplicity of materials.

What a fantastic if not completely terrifying idea. See much more of the residence on Home DSGN. (via neatorama)

Update: If this makes you queasy or uncomfortable, I urge you not to read about Skywalking.

 

 



Art Design

Knife Typography

April 14, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Life is Beautiful is a 2009 installation by Iranian artist Farhad Moshiri using hundreds of kitchen knives to create some exquisite typography.

 

 

 



Art Design

Embodiment: A Neon Skeleton by Eric Franklin

April 4, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Portland-based sculptor Eric Franklin constructs stunning (if not slightly disconcerting) anatomical light structures that are fully hollow and filled with ionized krypton, causing them to glow similar to a neon light. The glass skeleton above, Embodiment, is my jaw-dropping favorite of this series. The piece took over 1,000 hours of work over a two year period and is actually built from 10 separate units of glass formed from borosilicate glass tubing. The process of creating something like this is unbelievably painstaking as Franklin shares via email:

Every glass seal has to be perfect, and this piece contains hundreds. Everywhere one tube joins another, or a tube terminates, glass tubes were sealed together. They have to be perfect in order to preserve the luminosity of the krypton. If one rogue molecule gets inside the void of the glass tubing it can eventually contaminate the gas and it will no longer glow. There are times when the holes in the seals are so small that you cannot actually see them with your eyes without the help of a leak detector. Once the glass pieces are ready to get filled with gas, I pull a high vacuum while the glass is hot in order to evacuate any dust or water vapor from the interior surface until there are literally no molecules inside the void of the glass. Then the krypton can be introduced and the glass sealed off. It’s an extremely tedious process, one I have somewhat of a love/hate relationship with.

You can see much more of Franklin’s work on his website, and if you liked this also check out the work of Jessica Lloyd-Jones. Photos above courtesy Brad Carlile. (via my amp goes to 11)