Design

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Amazing Design

A Postcard Writing Rube Goldberg Machine in a Suitcase

May 1, 2012

Christopher Jobson

As the sun regrettably sets on the art of letter writing, the inventive folks at design studio HEYHEYHEY have pieced together a clever contraption that promises to keep the art of travel postcards a thing of the present. Kind of. Melvin the Traveling Mini Machine is an elaborate Rube Goldberg machine that fits in a pair of suitcases that executes the simple task of “writing” and stamping a postcard of your choice, that is, if the absurdly elaborate sequence of steps goes off without a hitch. Whether or not these suitcases will make it through TSA remains to be seen. The piece is a sequel to a much larger device from early last year by a similar name, Melvin the Magical Mixed Media Machine. (via core77)

 

 

 

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Design

A Bathroom Situated Atop a 15-Story Elevator Shaft

April 27, 2012

Christopher Jobson

While not particularly the fine art you might be accustomed to on Colossal, it was impossible to pass this up. Guadalajara-based architects Hernandez Silva Arquitectos recently designed the interior of a new penthouse situated on top of a 1970s Mexican colonial building in Guadalajara, México. A notable feature of the home is a powder room situated atop an unused 15-story elevator shaft. Via Hernandez Silva Arquitectos:

A characteristic feature of the project is that a volume that was originally intended for a second elevator and was never installed becomes a powder room with a glass floor that looks down all the 15 levels, the PPDG penthouse is a great versatile modulated space, with great views all this with the concepts of transparency and the simplicity of materials.

What a fantastic if not completely terrifying idea. See much more of the residence on Home DSGN. (via neatorama)

Update: If this makes you queasy or uncomfortable, I urge you not to read about Skywalking.

 

 



Art Design

Knife Typography

April 14, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Life is Beautiful is a 2009 installation by Iranian artist Farhad Moshiri using hundreds of kitchen knives to create some exquisite typography.

 

 

 



Art Design

Embodiment: A Neon Skeleton by Eric Franklin

April 4, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Portland-based sculptor Eric Franklin constructs stunning (if not slightly disconcerting) anatomical light structures that are fully hollow and filled with ionized krypton, causing them to glow similar to a neon light. The glass skeleton above, Embodiment, is my jaw-dropping favorite of this series. The piece took over 1,000 hours of work over a two year period and is actually built from 10 separate units of glass formed from borosilicate glass tubing. The process of creating something like this is unbelievably painstaking as Franklin shares via email:

Every glass seal has to be perfect, and this piece contains hundreds. Everywhere one tube joins another, or a tube terminates, glass tubes were sealed together. They have to be perfect in order to preserve the luminosity of the krypton. If one rogue molecule gets inside the void of the glass tubing it can eventually contaminate the gas and it will no longer glow. There are times when the holes in the seals are so small that you cannot actually see them with your eyes without the help of a leak detector. Once the glass pieces are ready to get filled with gas, I pull a high vacuum while the glass is hot in order to evacuate any dust or water vapor from the interior surface until there are literally no molecules inside the void of the glass. Then the krypton can be introduced and the glass sealed off. It’s an extremely tedious process, one I have somewhat of a love/hate relationship with.

You can see much more of Franklin’s work on his website, and if you liked this also check out the work of Jessica Lloyd-Jones. Photos above courtesy Brad Carlile. (via my amp goes to 11)

 

 



Art Design

Geometric Currency Sculptures Folded by Kristi Malakoff

April 3, 2012

Christopher Jobson

I’m really enjoying these folded and pasted currency sculptures by Canadian visual artist Kristi Malakoff (previously). Each polyhedra is folded, cut and pasted together from several bills, blending the textures and colors from multiple worldwide currencies. (via my modern met)

Update: These particular pieces were designed by Tom Hull, Meenakshi Mukerji, Heinz Strobl, and Makoto Yamaguchi.

 

 



Design Photography

Gravity Defying Photography for Chocolate Trail by NAM

April 2, 2012

Christopher Jobson

First: everything in these photos, liquid typography included, is part of a single photograph, and if you don’t believe it just watch the video. This new series of ads was created by art/design collective NAM (previously here and here) for the Harbour City Chocolate Trail, a charity project for the Hong Kong Blood Cancer Foundation. The series uses their signature method of suspending objects and people with strings and cables to create weightless environments that appear to be caught mid-explosion. See many more photos and behind the scenes videos of the project here. If you like this style of non-digital execution, make sure you’re also familiar with Le Creative Sweatshop.