History

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History Photography

Seregey Larenkov: Berlin, Prague, Moscow 1945/2010

November 22, 2010

Christopher Jobson

Russian photographer Sergey Larenkov melds photos taken during World War II with photos he shoots himself from the same vantage point in locations around Berlin, Prague, Moscow and Vienna. The results are an extremely haunting juxtaposition of time and place. See full-size images via his blog. (via theo)

 

 



History Photography

My Parents Were Awesome Blog Becomes a Book

November 21, 2010

Christopher Jobson

Some recent submissions to My Parents Were Awesome, a great blog where people submit photos of their parents being awesome. Soon to be a book, My Parents Were Awesome: Before Fanny Packs and Minivans, They Were People Too.

 

 



Design History Illustration

Matt Stevens interprets the number 17

November 18, 2010

Christopher Jobson

Designer Matt Stevens uses Pantone swatches to illustrate the past 17 years. So much brilliance in such a tiny space. I think Jobs and Dolly are my favorites. (via drawn)

 

 



History Photography

Time Passes

November 3, 2010

Christopher Jobson

Photographer unknown, posted in reverse chronological order. (via I like this blog)

 

 



Art Design History

Kyle Bean, Mobile Evolution

October 27, 2010

Christopher Jobson

Digging Kyle Bean’s mobile evolution Russian doll project. If you’re interested, Kyle makes many more incredible things out of a paper. (via bldg//wlf)

 

 



Art Design History

Writing Without Words by Stefanie Posavec

October 25, 2010

Christopher Jobson

This image by Stefanie Posavec represents all of the sentences in On the Road by Jack Kerouac. Each line is organized according to the number of words per sentence, and the sentences are color-coded according to theme. This is only one of many killer infographics in Posavec’s Writing Without Words series in which she attempts to visually organize the language of books. Prints available. (via we find wildness)

 

 



Design History

Dazzle Camouflage Gives Warships an Unlikely Disguise

October 22, 2010

Christopher Jobson

I’ve been meaning to post this for a while ever since seeing it on Graphic Hug a while back but it kinda fell off the radar. Dazzle camouflage was a technique used during both WWI and WWII to obscure aspects war ships.

At first glance Dazzle seems unlikely camouflage, drawing attention to the ship rather than hiding it, but this technique was developed after the Allied Navies were unable to develop effective means to disguise ships in all weather.

Dazzle did not conceal the ship but made it difficult for the enemy to estimate its type, size, speed and heading. The idea was to disrupt the visual rangefinders used for naval artillery. Its purpose was confusion rather than concealment. An observer would find it difficult to know exactly whether the stern or the bow is in view; and it would be equally difficult to estimate whether the observed vessel is moving towards or away from the observer’s position.

RISD also has a super cool online gallery on the topic. Great stuff. On a related note, and from a different war, see also Quaker Guns. (via graphic hug)