Illustration

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Illustration

Black and Red Calder-Like Illustrations Combine Geometric Shapes into Spiders, Jellyfish, and Birds

January 4, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

When Adam Goldberg, founder of Santa Monica-based studio Trüf Creative isn’t crafting work for a client, the designer likes to engage his creativity with an ongoing series of minimal illustrations titled FAÜNA. The pieces combine black and red shapes and linework to form stylized versions of animals and insects, such as the one-eyed spider above or polka-dotted fish below.

Although Goldberg is directly inspired by artists such as Joan Miro, Alexander Calder, and Wassily Kandinsky, he is also influenced by the client work he has completed over the years. “The simplicity, geometry, and composure that we try to achieve with our branding work rubs off on the artwork,” he explained to Adobe Create Magazine. “I think more in terms of composition and balance more now than I ever have — and that’s because of the branding work.” You can see more of Goldberg’s agency work on Trüf Creative’s website and Behance.

 

 



Art Illustration

Layers of Realistic and Invented Winged Creatures Combine in Surreal Illustrations by Vorja Sánchez

December 13, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"Birds Dialogue 2," Mixed media on paper

“Birds Dialogue 2,” Mixed media on paper

Vorja Sánchez (previously) combines imaginative interpretations of birds, wolves, and hybrid creatures into surreal paintings and mixed media works that are diverse in both style and form. In the follow up to his popular work Bird Dialogues, the Spanish illustrator layers winged animals of all colors and breeds, presenting realistic drawings alongside half-formed birds that spring from the deep corners of his brain. You can see more recent illustrations of real and invented creatures, in addition to less public murals and less formal sketches, on Instagram and Facebook.

"Birds Dialogue 2" (detail), Mixed media on paper

“Birds Dialogue 2” (detail), Mixed media on paper

"Birds Dialogue 2" (detail), Mixed media on paper

“Birds Dialogue 2” (detail), Mixed media on paper

"Organic Haku," Ink, watercolor and colored pencil on paper.

“Organic Haku,” Ink, watercolor and colored pencil on paper.

"Organic Haku" (detail), Ink, watercolor and colored pencil on paper.

“Organic Haku” (detail), Ink, watercolor and colored pencil on paper.

"Mirada orgánica," Pencil and colored pencil on old paper.

“Mirada orgánica,” Pencil and colored pencil on old paper.

"Frutos Rojos," Ink and watercolor on paper

“Frutos Rojos,” Ink and watercolor on paper

"Frutos Rojos" (detail), Ink and watercolor on paper

“Frutos Rojos” (detail), Ink and watercolor on paper

 

 



Art Illustration

Birds Sit Delicately on Vintage Sewing Machines and Typewriters in a New Illustrated Series by Steeven Salvat

December 6, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

French artist Steeven Salvat (previously) creates meticulously rendered drawings of animals inhabiting the same world as machinery, such as his previous crustacean series. His project Perchés showcases different breeds of birds using antique objects as areas for temporary rest, like the above owl which sits atop a typewriter. “I wanted to highlight the contrasts between lightness and brutality, fragility of nature and immortality of objects,” Salvat tells Colossal.

The artist works with watercolor on pastel paper, which he then draws millions of lines on top with .13mm Rotring pens and China ink. He collaborated with the Parisian studio Sergeant Paper to edit five drawings from the series in a signed and numbered limited edition of 100, which you can purchase via his online shop. You can view a time-lapse of one of his included drawings in the video below.

 

 



Art Illustration

Affirmational Text Art and Doodles Combine in Immersive Murals by Shantell Martin

December 6, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

New York-based British artist Shantell Martin is known for her black and white doodles which combine patch-worked faces with straightforward messages. Martin’s multi-dimensional works address complex issues such as identity, intersectionality, and other topics relating to the modern human condition. Her public murals and immersive gallery presentations are made intuitively, building fields of loose drawings with a meditative style. Martin teaches as an adjunct professor at NYU Tisch in the Interactive Telecommunications Program, where she combines visual art with personal storytelling and technology. You can follow her global drawings on Instagram and take a short peek into her process in the video below.

 

 



Design Illustration

Illustrations Transform Nike Air Maxes Into Concepts That Pay Homage to Their History

December 5, 2018

Andrew LaSane

Images courtesy of Rosie Lee on Behance

London-based creative agency Rosie Lee took the original design inspirations for iconic sneakers and turned them into conceptual sculptures that architects and sneakerheads will especially appreciate. Paying homage to the Centre Pompidou, the museum in Paris that inspired legendary Nike designer Tinker Hatfield to create the Nike Air Max 1 in the late-1980s, the team at Rosie Lee transformed the iconic shoe into a 3D model of its Parisian inspiration. The illustration closely resembles the inside-out architectural elements that Renzo Piano, Richard Rogers, and Gianfranco Franchini used when designing and building the complex in the 1970s.

The creative team also created 3D illustrations for two other Air Max models: the Nike Air Max 90 and the Nike Air Max 95. The Air Max 90 concept is built entirely out of speakers and rigging as a nod to the culture of record crate diggers (“early adopters” of the sneaker model, according to Rosie Lee), while the Air Max 95 illustration was made to resemble the anatomy of a human foot since that’s where the sneaker’s designer, Sergio Lozano, found inspiration over 23 years ago.

Rosie Lee works on interdisciplinary retail design, branding, and digital projects. You can find more of their latest work on Behance and Instagram, and view their full portfolio on the Rosie Lee website.

 

 



Illustration

Infinite Cities Take Shape in Imagined Architectural Drawings by JaeCheol Park

December 4, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

JaeCheol Park, who goes by the artist name PaperBlue, creates intricate drawings in the style of architectural drafts. But rather than imagining a buildable building, Park employs the classic illustrative aesthetic to form fantastical urban environments where structures appear and disappear, bleeding into one another in a haze of geometric patterns. His loose linework and intensive layering enliven the historical architectural styles he highlights in his drawings. The artist, who is based in Seongnam, South Korea, has a broad audience for his digital and concept art along with his more traditional drafting-inspired work. Park shares drawing tutorials on Youtube and finished work on Facebook. He has also published a book, which is available on Amazon. (via ARCHatlas)