Photography

Section



Art Photography

Bec Wonders

November 3, 2011

Christopher Jobson

New work by Sweden-based artist and fashion designer Bec Wonders who is experimenting with painting on top of her photography.

 

 



Art Photography

Andre Petterson

November 2, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Beautiful mixed media artwork by Vancouver-based artist Andre Petterson, from his April solo exhibition at Bau-Xi Gallery. See much more here. (via my modern met)

 

 



Photography

Composite Photograph Made from 500 Self-Portraits

November 1, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Ever since photographer Noah Kalina began his Everyday portrait project 11 years ago (I had no idea he was still actively photographing himself, talk about commitment) there have been hundreds of inspired photogs snapping daily self-portraits. Flickr user clickflashwhir is one of these people, taking hundreds of portraits over the past several years. Tiemen Rapati downloaded 500 of her photos and created this beautiful composite image by finding an average RGB value for each pixel and dividing it by the total number of portraits. I have no idea how this is done, but I bet it involves computers. It’s amazing how surgically accurate she must sit, I assume using her eyes to align each shot. Really stunning. Just a note, though it says Tiemen used 400 photos on Flickr, he averaged in another 100 for this post. (via feltron)

 

 



Documentary History Photography

Suitcases from the Willard Asylum for the Insane

October 31, 2011

Christopher Jobson

The Willard Asylum for the Insane was an institution in Willard, New York designed help people with chronic mental illness, and was in operation from 1910 through the 1960s before being closed by the state. In 1995 New York State Museum staff were given access to the secrets left behind decades before when the doors were shuttered. After an initial investigation they became aware of an entire attic full of suitcases in the pathology lab building, the personal belongings of patients admitted to the asylum who supposedly never left. In an effort to archive and document the history of the institution photographer Jon Crispin has been given the rare opportunity to photograph the contents of each suitcase and has launched an extremely successful Kickstarter project to help fund the endeavor.

While I fully recognize the fascinating and historical nature of these very personal items, and applaud the museum staff and Crispin for their preservation work, I can’t help but feel a tinge of sadness and unease for the circumstances under which these belongings became separated from their owners. To me they seem like the time capsules of lives arrested, their contents suggesting the hope of a continued life elsewhere: everyday objects for grooming, hobbies, fashion never to be used again. Eerie.

See more contents from the suitcases on Crispin’s blog.

 

 



Photography

Miharu Matsunaga: Ten-ten

October 29, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Using thousands of meticulously painted dots (“ten-ten” in Japanese) designer and photographer Miharu Matsunaga has been exploring the interconnectedness of people and places in these two recently completed projects. The first, a series of mottled portraits was completed as part of her graduate work at Tama Art University. The delicate white dots are meant as a visual display of the often neglected and forgotten interconnectedness between “family, parents, sister, friend, man, woman, adult, baby, race,” and people of different languages. Matsunaga continues this organic, dotted exploration in Ten-ten wherein the dots are used to cover interior walls, vehicles, and other objects. Stunning work. (via spoon and tamago)

 

 



Photography

High Speed Liquid and Bubble Photographs by Heinz Maier

October 27, 2011

Christopher Jobson

It never ceases to amaze me: just when I think I’ve seen every possible permutation of an artform or technique—be it figurative sculpture, stop motion animation, or in this case, high speed photography—somebody comes along and manages to do something radically different. German photographer Heinz Maier says that he began taking photographs less than a year ago in late 2010. He claims to not know what direction he’s heading in just yet, right now he’s experimenting with macro photography, mostly insects, animals, and these delicate high speed water droplets. Personally, I think he’s found a great direction. There are so many things happening here to make these photographs simply outstanding: the lighting, the colors, the occasional use of symmetry in the reflection of water, let alone the skill of knowing how to use the camera itself. It’s hard to believe these aren’t digital. See much more of his work here.