Photography

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Photography

Flowers Soaked in Liquid Nitrogen Shatter on Impact

September 7, 2012

Christopher Jobson

In his Broken Flower series photographer Jon Shireman soaked various kinds of flowers in a liquid nitrogen bath for up to 30 minutes before using a special spring-loaded contraption to slam them against a surface at high speed. He then photographed the hundreds of fragments spread across a white surface like sharp glass shards. Beautiful work. See the rest over on Flickr.

 





 

 



Photography

Noah Kalina Updates Self-Portrait Video to Include 12.5 Years of Daily Portraits (4,514 Photos!)

September 4, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Photographer Noah Kalina has been taking a self-portrait each day for the last 12.5 years as part of his aptly titled Everyday project. Six years ago a video chronicling six years of portraits set to music by Carly Commando took the internet by storm spawning legions of people to embark on similar self-portrait projects. This morning Kalina released an updated video containing some 4,500 photographs shot from January 11, 2000 through June 30, 2012. Here they are all at once.

 

 



History Photography

Composite Photographs Blend Scenes from the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake and Present Day

September 4, 2012

Christopher Jobson

In this series of carefully photoshopped images, photographer Shawn Clover created composite photographs that blend historical scenes from the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and his own present-day captures of the same locations. A number of other artists have created similar images, most notably Sergey Larenkov’s Ghosts of WWII, but Clover really seems to have put in extreme amounts of effort in trying to determine how each photograph precisely overlaps the other, resulting in some fascinating interactions between past and present. Clover’s work is broken into two parts, Part 1 was created in 2010 and Part 2 was completed just last month. (via Laughing Squid)

 

 



Photography

Unusual Long Exposure Firework Photographs by David Johnson

August 27, 2012

Christopher Jobson

While attending the International Fireworks Show in Ottawa, Canada earlier this month photographer David Johnson had his camera in hand to document the night. When Spain’s entry into the competition begin he decided to try something a little different resulting in the photos you see here which are unlike any long exposure firework shots I’ve ever seen. Via email David tells me how he accomplished the effect:

The technique I used was a simple refocus during the long exposure. Each shot was about a second long, sometimes two. I’d start out of focus, and when I heard the explosion I would quickly refocus, so the little stems on these deep sea creature lookalikes would grow into a fine point. The shapes are quite bizarre, some of them I was pleasantly surprised with.

What’s interesting is that unlike usual firework photos that seem to make long trails across the sky, Johnson’s photos look like flowers with little triangular plumes coming to a point. Pretty amazing.

 

 



Photography

Underwater Experiments Continued: Wonderful New Photos of Jellyfish by Alexander Semenov

August 26, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Since first covering the photography of Russian biologist Alexander Semenov (previously) back in January his self-directed “Underwater Experiments” series has continued unabated as he releases other-worldy shots of the Earth’s most elusive creatures almost daily. Again and again Semenov captures some of the most jaw-dropping photographs of underwater life I’ve ever seen, most frequently an animal called lion’s mane jellyfish (Cyanea capillata) which is the largest known species of jellyfish in the world. What you see here only scratches the surface of his work over the last couple of months, definitely urge you to get lost in his underwater gallery.

 

 



Photography

Photographer Caleb Charland Wires Apple Trees, Fruit Baskets and Stacked Coins to Create Alternative Batteries

August 20, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Lamp powered by 300 live apples, 2012

Portland, Maine-based photographer Caleb Charland frequently merges art and science with his photographic experiments involving electricity, fire, and magnetism. One of his ongoing projects involves a series of alternative power sources created using fruit, coins, and even vinegar to power the lights in his long exposure photographs. The apple photograph above involved a nearly 11-hour setup as he carefully hammered 300 zinc-coated galvanized nails into apples (zinc reacts with acid in the apples creating electricity, science!) and used copper wiring to transfer the current to a standard living room lamp. Even then, the light was so dim it required a 4-hour exposure during which Charland fended off ravenous deer through the night with an impromptu shaker made from a tin can and wire nuts. You can read much more about the ordeal over on Discover, and here’s a video of the entire project coming together.

Caleb recent launched a new website where you can access a few years of his photography, I strongly urge you to at least look at his Demonstrations gallery. He’ll also have a few prints in an upcoming group show at Brancolini Grimaldi in London this September.

 

Vinegar Battery, 2011

Fruit Battery Still Life (Citrus), 2012

Coin Battery, 2010