Photography

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Photography

A Frosty Morning on the Rhine Photographed by Patrick Hübschmann

March 4, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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German photographer and graphic designer Patrick Hübschmann recently captured this great series of photos on a freezing morning on the Rhine in Southern Germany. The trees and grass are completely covered in a thick layer of frost, conveying an uncanny sense of stillness in each shot. (via behance)

 

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Art Photography

Picturesque Chinese Landscapes are Actually Disguised Photos of Landfills

February 28, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Take a few steps back or perhaps just squint your eyes and these images by artist Yao Lu might resemble traditional Chinese landscape paintings of cliffs, waterfalls, and mountains. Look a bit closer and your perspective may change. Lu digitally assembles each of her images using photographs of landfills and other aspects of urbanization draped in green mesh to mimic idyllic scenery. Similar to the recent work of Yang Yongliang featured on this blog just last week, Lu seems to be making a thinly-veiled commentary on the encroaching ecological threat of urbanization. See much more over at Bruce Silverstein Gallery. (via beautiful decay)

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Art Photography

Surreal Self-Portraits by 22-Year-Old Artist Noell S. Oszvald who Began Photographing and Editing a Year Ago

February 23, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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I was astounded to learn that 22-year-old Hungarian photographer Noell S. Oszvald who lives and works in Budapest picked up a camera only a year ago. The gifted artist has shared only two dozen or so images with the world via Flickr but they already show an accomplished grasp of composition, editing and digital manipulation. Oszvald tells Alice over at My Modern Met that she chooses only to work in black and white because she finds color distracting from her conceptual ideas. She also mentions that she wishes for viewers of her work to find their own meaning and interpretation of each image. “I don’t want to tell people what to see in my images,” explains Oszland to My Modern Met, “this is the reason why I never really write any descriptions other than titles. It shows what I wish to express but everyone is free to figure out what the picture says to them. It’s very interesting to read so many different thoughts about the same piece of work.” See many more of her photographs here. (via my modern met)

 

 



Photography Science

Massive Bird Nests Built on Telephone Poles in Southern Africa are Home to Multiple Species of Birds

February 18, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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No these aren’t haystacks stuck in a phone pole. Visit the Kalahari Desert in the south of Africa and you’re bound to run into a peculiar animal called the Sociable Weaver Bird. The birds are called “social” not just because they live in organized colonies, but because they build massive homes out of sticks, grass and cotton that are home to several other kinds birds. That’s right, the nests are so large that birds of other species are welcome to setup shop, not the least of which is the South African pygmy falcon which lives exclusively inside the social weaver’s nests that often accommodate over 100 birds at at time. Via the San Diego Zoo:

The sociable weaver’s nest sees plenty of guests—a regular Kalahari Desert inn! The South African pygmy falcon Polihierax semitorquatus relies completely on the sociable weavers’ nest for its own home, often nesting side by side with the sociable weavers. The pied barbet, familiar chat, red-headed finch, ashy tit, and rosy-faced lovebird often find comfort in the cozy nesting chambers, too. Vultures, owls, and eagles will roost on the nests’ broad roof. Why are weavers willing to share the huge nest they worked so hard to make? More residents mean more eyes keeping a watch for danger. And the weavers often learn from the other birds where new sources of food can be found.

Photographer Dillon Marsh has a lovely series of weaver bird nest photographs titled Assimilation that are well worth a look. (via neatorama)

 

 



Art Photography

The Silent City: Digitally Assembled Futuristic Megalopolises by Yang Yongliang

February 18, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Sleepless Wonderland, Lightbox, 2012

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Sleepless Wonderland, Lightbox, 2012 (detail)

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Sleepless Wonderland, Lightbox, 2012 (detail)

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Sleepless Wonderland, Lightbox, 2012 (detail)

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Snake and Grenade, Lightbox, 2012

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Snake and Grenade, Lightbox, 2012 (detail)

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Wolf and Landmines, Lightbox, 2012

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Full Moon, Lightbox, 2012

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Bowl of Tapei No. 03, 2012

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Bowl of Tapei No. 04, 2012

Chinese artist Yang Yongliang (previously) recently released three new bodies of work that will be on view at Galerie Paris-Beijing from from March 14th to April 27th, 2013. Born in Shanghai in 1980, Yongliang is known for his sprawling photographic collages that depict the devastating effects of uncontrolled urbanisation and industrialisation. At a distance the works look like traditional Chinese painting and calligraphy but when viewed up close, the peaceful mountains and seascapes are found to be choked with buildings, factories, and machinery. The images of above scarcely convey the detail in these pieces, but look at this high resolution version of Sleepless Wonderland to get an idea. Head over to Galerie Paris-Beijing to explore more of the three collections titled Silent Valley, Moonlight, and a Bowl of Taipei. All images courtesy the gallery.

 

 



Documentary Photography

Finding Vivian Maier: A New Documentary About One of the World’s Most Mysterious Street Photographers

February 16, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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In 2007 Chicago 26-year-old real estate agent (and president of the Jefferson Park Historical Society) John Maloof walked into an auction house and placed a $380 bid on a box of 30,000 prints and negatives from an unknown photographer. Realizing the street photographs of 1950s/60s era Chicago and New York were of unusually high quality he purchased another lot of photographer’s work totaling some 100,000 photographic negatives, thousands of prints, 700 rolls of undeveloped color film, home movies, audio tape interviews, and original cameras.

Over time it became clear the photos belonged to a Chicago nanny named Vivian Maier who had photographed prolifically for nearly 40 years, but who never shared her work during her lifetime. Since the discovery Maier’s photographs have received international attention with collections touring in cities around the world as well as the publication of a book. Now, a documentary called Finding Vivian Maier directed by Maloof and Charlie Siskel is nearing completion and the trailer above is a tantalizing preview of what promises to me a fascinating film. Can’t wait.

 

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