Photography

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Photography

High Speed Liquid Flowers Photographed by Jack Long

May 26, 2012

Christopher Jobson

At a quick glance, these colorful photographs by Milwaukee-based photographer Jack Long might pass as some kind of strange exotic flowers, but a squint of the eyes later reveals they are actually high-speed photographs of colored water, captured in a way to mimic the shape of blooms, leaves, and even pots.

Each photograph from Long’s Vessels and Blooms series is captured in a stunningly precise take that took months of trial and error to perfect. Like a mad scientist, he creates cocktails of dyes, thickeners, and pigments for each component of the shot and then blasts them through a customized mechanism before snapping a perfectly timed capture. “This series was a culmination of months of planning and testing. Hundreds of captures are made in testing and then many more during the actual final capture stage. A very few stand out as being the best,” he says. You can see much more of his work on Flickr.

 

 

 

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Art Photography

Neon Text Installations by Lee Jung

May 21, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Photographer Lee Jung lives and works in Seoul, South Korea where she created and photographed this gorgeous series of text-based light installations. Jung had work on display at the Hong Kong International Art Fair with One and J. Gallery which closed yesterday. (via booooooom)

 

 



Photography

Gale-Force Winds Directly to the Face

May 16, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Lithuanian photographer and artist Tadao Cern has been working on a series of hilarious portraits entitled, ahem, Blow Job, that depicts individuals enduring gale-force winds directly to the face. Say goodbye to the next 15 minutes, he’s taken 100 portraits so far. And if you liked these, here’s a similar series by Jonathan Robert Willis from last year. (via behance)

 

 



Art Photography

Photographic Specimens by Michael Mapes

May 2, 2012

Christopher Jobson

New York artist Michael Mapes creates elaborate specimen boxes by dissecting photographs and then compartmentalizing individual fragments within plastic bags, glass vials, magnifiers, in gelatin capsules and on insect pins. The boxes exist in an uncanny area between photography and sculpture, functioning both as portraits and as fascinating scientific canvases that make you question the the logic behind the organization of each piece. See more of his work over at Parlor Gallery, and if you liked this also check out the work of David Adey.

 

 

 



Photography

Starry Night: Light Installations by Lee Eunyeol

April 30, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Photographer Lee Eunyeol constructs elaborate light installations that appear as if the night sky was flipped upside down with glowing stars and planets nested inside tall grass or between deep earthen cracks. Though Lee does not have a website I can quote his artist statement I received via email:

Starry night expresses private spaces given by night and various emotions that are not able to be defined and described in the space. I’ve chosen analogue type for the expression which attempts to install electric bulbs in an objet to be expressed using back space of night by taking advantage of huge studio. There are two spaces in photographs. One is a space before electric bulbs of familiar landscape are installed and the other is a space after electric bulbs expressed by dispersing personal emotion are installed. Unified light from these two spaces generates a mysterious landscape.

Eunyeol will be showing this series of photos at the Gana Art Space in Seoul starting this week. If you liked this, also check out the work of Barry Underwood.

 

 

 



Art Photography

The Trashcam Project: German Garbage Men Convert Dumpsters into Pinhole Cameras

April 20, 2012

Christopher Jobson

A group of enterprising and rather creative garbage men out of Hamburg, Germany have blended work with artistic expression by converting dumpsters into giant pinhole cameras, dubbed the Trashcam Project. The method is pretty straightforward: by drilling a small hole on one side of the dumpster, an image is projected onto a giant sheet of photo paper suspended inside. Each shot takes about an hour to capture and its then developed in their special lab. See many more photos from the ongoing project here.