Design Food

Planetary Structural Layer Cakes Designed by Cakecrumbs

August 1, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Self-taught chef Rhiannon over at Cakecrumbs has been working on a fun series of planetary cakes that are designed to be scientifically accurate with different types of cake representing various layers within Earth and Jupiter. For her Jupiter Cake the center is the theoretical rock/ice core (mudcake), followed by a layer of liquid metallic hydrogen (almond butter), and finally the liquid molecular hydrogen (colored vanilla). She layered her Earth Cake similarly and finished it off with some absurdly detailed continent design made with marshmallow fondant.

Due to high demand she just posted an extremely detailed tutorial including a video that explains how to make spherical concentric layer cakes. Which is now a thing. That I will have at my birthdays now and forever. (via I F’ing Love Science)

 

 



Photography

Airborne in the Bronx: Jose the Amazing Photographed by Chris Arnade

July 31, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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For the last several years photographer Chris Arnade has virtually embedded himself in an area of the South Bronx called Hunts Point, one of the poorest congressional districts in the country, where poverty and addiction has laid claim to countless struggling individuals. His unflinching and candid documentation of addicts and prostitutes in Hunts Point, Faces of Addiction (warning: graphic and occasionally nsfw), has gained international attention.

One individual Arnade has encountered over the years is a young resident named Jose Garcia, who, along with several of his friends, have a penchant for doing wildly dangerous jumps and flips off of high platforms such as broken-down trucks or buildings. The spectacular photos have grown into a small offshoot of his Hunts Point work called Jose the Amazing. Of his first encounter with Jose, Arnade shares:

Last year I was in a desolate part of Hunts Point, talking to a friend. A group of about ten teenagers came down the street, loud, filled with energy, and seemingly marauding (kicking over cones, jumping on and over stationary cars, etc). I have never had a problem in my twenty years in New York City, but that does not mean I don’t stay aware. As they passed, out of the corner of my eye I spotted Jose do a back flip over a hydrant. Amazed, I yelled out to him. He and his friends, who were also warily eyeing me, thinking I was a cop, were planning to run away but his friend Henry had a sprained ankle, so they stood their ground.

Since then I have come to grow very fond of Jose and his friends, and have done many photo shoots together. Big fans of Parkour, Hip-hop, and Anime, they are fighting against an area where the pressures of poverty, drugs, and limited opportunity weigh heavily.

For me it’s another lesson in expectations. All of my accumulated baggage from popular culture signaled for me to get away from these kids and their bad intentions, all theirs told them to get away from the cop who would treat them unfairly. Neither of us did that, and because of that I certainly have learned a bit more about the Bronx.

As often happens with documentary work like this, Arnade occasionally finds himself drawn into his subjects’ lives as he is unable to walk away after setting down the camera. One such person is Jose, who is filled with optimism, energy and possesses an uncanny physical ability, but is now dealing with extreme adversity. While putting together these photographs Arnade mentioned if anyone connected to any form of acrobatics, circus arts, or stunt work in the NYC area might know of a way to help, they can get in touch. Serious inquiries only. All photos courtesy the photographer.

 

 



Art Design

Sou Fujimoto’s Giant Serpentine Pavilion Converted into a Storm of LED Lightning by UVA

July 31, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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For the last thirteen years Serpentine Gallery has invited a guest architect to design a temporary structure on the London gallery’s front lawn. In what is billed as “the most ambitious architectural program of its kind worldwide,” designs have come from such visionaries as Ai Weiwei in 2012 and Frank Gehry in 2008. This year, Japanese architect Sou Fujimoto (who at 41 become the youngest to accept the invitation) constructed a large network of 20mm steel poles and latticed metal that covers an area of 3,800 square feet.

While the white pavilion is impressive in its own right, the gallery further commissioned London-based United Visual Artists to create a network of LED lights that are meant to mimic the natural forms of an electric storm. At night the normally grounded structure becomes an electrified geometric cloud that flashes and pulsates with light. The installation is further enhanced by an accompanied soundtrack of precisely timed soundbites including the buzzing of electrical plants, effectively creating an auditory effect of thunder. A somewhat similar intervention took place here in Chicago a few years ago when LuftWerk transformed Anish Kapoor’s Cloud Gate.

 

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Art

New Paper Birds from Diana Beltran Herrera

July 30, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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It’s been over a year since we last checked in with paper artist Diana Beltran Herrera (previously here and here) whose skill in crafting the fine details of birds using paper has continued to evolve. Herrera’s work has begun appearing in several galleries and exhibitions around the world including Beers.Lambert Contemporary earlier this year and at the Art and Soul of Paper earlier this spring. She’s currently working on a collection of eight sculptures that will be on view at The Cornell Fine Arts Museum in Florida starting September 17th. See more on Flickr.

 

 



Art Photography

Landscapes Formed From Human Bodies by Carl Warner

July 30, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Shin Knee Valley

In this series of photographs by Carl Warner, human bodies have been contorted, lit, and manipulated to form expansive landscapes reminiscent of barren deserts and mountains. The London-based photographer who might be best known for his Foodscapes, says that he shoots all of the forms in his studio to focus attention on “one person’s body, creating a sense of place so that a body that is lived in becomes a place to live.” The images are then digitally pieced together using Photoshop. If you liked this also check out the work of Arno Rafael Minkkinen and of course Spencer Tunick (nsfw). (via PetaPixel)

 

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Valley of the Reclining Woman

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The Desert of Sleeping Men

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Desert of Backs

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Shoulder Hill Valley

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Headless Horizon

 

 



Art

Rainbow Anatomy by Shok Oner

July 30, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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London-based street artist Shok Oner has been making work since the 1980s. I’m really enjoying his current series of rainbow hued x-ray pieces, some of which have been turned into prints. You can follow him over on Facebook and Flickr. (via street anatomy)

 

 

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