Art

Optical Illusion Skull Portraits by Tom French

April 16, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Painter Tom French just posted a number of new paintings in preparation for his upcoming exhibition titled Don’t Look Back at Zero Cool Gallery in London later this month. French’s acrylic works often depict couples in seemingly amorous relationships that create the optical illusion of a skull, pieces that walk the line between beautiful and unsettling. Just squint or take a few steps back from your monitor for maximum effect. You can see much more of his work on Flickr, and prints are available at Zero Cool.

 

 



Art

Ephemeral Portraits Cut from Layers of Wire Mesh by Seung Mo Park

April 16, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Using a process that could be the new definition of meticulous, Korean sculptor Seung Mo Park creates giant ephemeral portraits by cutting layer after layer of wire mesh. Each work begins with a photograph which is superimposed over layers of wire with a projector, then using a subtractive technique Park slowly snips away areas of mesh. Each piece is several inches thick as each plane that forms the final image is spaced a few finger widths apart, giving the portraits a certain depth and dimensionality that’s hard to convey in a photograph, but this video on YouTube shows it pretty well. Park just exhibited this month at Blank Space Gallery in New York as part of his latest series Maya (meaning “illusion” in Sanskrit). (via lavinia tribiani)

 

 



Art Food

Incredible Miniature Food Sculptures

April 15, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Tel Aviv-based artist Shay Aaron constructs incredible miniaturized food sculptures at 1:12 scale that look almost completely edible. You can see hundreds more photos on Flickr and he also makes miniature food jewelry which is available over on Etsy. (via flavorwire)

 

 



Art Design

Knife Typography

April 14, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Life is Beautiful is a 2009 installation by Iranian artist Farhad Moshiri using hundreds of kitchen knives to create some exquisite typography.

 

 

 



Illustration

The Holi Festival of Colors

April 12, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Another year, another collection of glorious videos featuring the Hindu Holi Festival of Colors at locations around the world, and as the quality of equipment improves it just gets better and better. This latest addition was shot and directed by Jonathan Bregel and Khalid Mohtaseb from New York-based Variable in India this last March. I highly recommend watching it in HD, as their beautiful camera work seems to capture every single particle of color as its hurled through the air.

 

Another widely-shared video was this clip from filmmaker Devin Graham that captures the Holi Festival in front of the Krishna Temple in Spanish Fork, Utah. You can read more about it over on the Huffington Post.

 

Lastly I can’t help but include my all-time favorite Holi clip from last year by Brian Thompson, also shot in Spanish Fork, Utah. The short is set to the track Optimist by cellist Zoe Keating who has climbed to the very top of my most-played artist list this last year. A stunning watch, every time.

 

 



Photography

Guido Mocafico's Magnificent Rectangular Serpents

April 12, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Generally when you encounter a photograph of a snake it’s coiled up in a circle, a clump, or perhaps dangling from a limb, twisted into a naturally organic shape. Y’know, it’s snakelike. Photographer Guido Mocafico has taken a decidedly different approach with his Serpens series (Part 1, Part 2), choosing instead to place the snakes into rectangular boxes, snapping each photo from above at a precisely balanced moment, turning chaotic figures into something distinctly geometric. From Mocafico’s selection of different species to their gorgeous coloration and almost zen-like positioning, I’ve never seen anything like these. For more serpentine photography don’t miss the work of Mark Laita who travels everywhere to photograph the world’s deadliest snakes. (via supersonic electronic)