History Photography

A 102-Year-Old Transport Ship Sprouts a Floating Forest

June 3, 2013

Christopher Jobson

Homebush Bay in Sydney, Australia is home to the remnants of a ship-breaking yard that operated during the mid 20th-century. Large watercraft that outlived their usefulness were towed to Homebush Bay and dismantled to salvage any components that could be reused or sold for scrap.

One such ship was the SS Ayrfield, a 1,140-tonne behemoth built in 1911 as a steam collier that was later used during WWII as a transport ship. In 1972 it was brought to Homebush Bay to be dismantled, but fate would decide differently. Operations at the ship-breaking yard subsequently ceased and parts of several large vessels including the Ayrfield were left behind, the largest objects in an area now infamous for decades of chemical dumping and pollution. But only this century-old transport ship would be transformed by time into a floating forest, a peculiar home for trees and other vegetation that have since sprouted over the last few decades.

From 2008-2010 a concerted effort was made to remove many of the lingering chemicals in Homebush left from the industrial era. Not far away is the Brickpit Ring Walk, a former industrial site where nearly three billion bricks were made from 1911 through the 1980s that is now a carefully protected natural habitat. As the forest has grown inside the SS Ayrfield, the bay is now a popular place for photographers who wish to capture the uncanny sight of this strangely beautiful relic of the bay’s industrial past, not to mention nature’s resiliency.

A huge thanks to Bruce Hood, Andy Brill and Stephane & Eva for providing photos for this post. If you liked reading about the SS Ayrfield you might also like the Glass Beach in California. (via my modern met)

 

 



Art Photography

Mirrored Photographs Combined with Watercolor by Fabienne Rivory

June 2, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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French artist Fabienne Rivory creates these unusually beautiful images by working with mirrored photographs and watercolor paints. Rivory has been making artwork that blends paint and photography since 2007, a process she likens to the exploration of memory versus reality. Her most recent series titled Miroir is well worth a look, and prints are available here.

 

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Photography

High Speed Photographs of Exploding Lightbulbs Filled with Objects

May 31, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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As part of an ongoing exploration of high speed photography, Jon Smith has been filling standard incandescent light bulbs with various objects, liquids and other substances before causing them to explode in front of his camera. In some of his more interesting shots the photographer experiments by first dipping the bulb in paint, or carefully layering different colors of sand to create unexpected patterns as everything is hurled through the air. A number of Smith’s photos are being turned into metal prints which will be on exhibition at Fisher’s Town Hall later this year. See much more in his photostream.

 

 



Art

Paint the Rainbow: New Street Art by Seth

May 30, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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I love this new piece by street artist Seth, spotted today in Paris. You may remember his work from a few weeks ago in the temporary gallery space at the shuttered Les Bains nightclub. According to StreetArtNews the piece can be found on Rue de Julienne right about here. (via this isn’t happiness)

 

 



Design

The Free Little Library by Stereotank

May 30, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Recently installed in New York’s Nolita neighborhood the Free Little Library is a temporary outdoor shelving unit that functions as a free library. The clever design protects the books from the weather while allowing people to duck under a cover to see what’s available. The library was designed by Venezuelan design firm Stereotank as part of a collaboration with the Architectural League of New York and the Pen World Voices Festival who have selected 10 designers to build miniature free libraries in downtown Manhattan through September. Can’t wait to see the rest. (via designboom)

 

 



Art

Perceiving the Flow: Human Figures Composed of Unraveling Stainless Steel Ribbons by Gil Bruvel

May 29, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Though cast from bands of stainless steel ribbons, these figurative sculptures by Texas-based artist Gil Bruvel seem more fluid than solid, as if the wind could simply blow them apart. The works above are all part of the artist’s Flow series that he says are meant to reveal “an essential underlying fluidity that exists simultaneously within the physical, quantum, and metaphoric realms.” Bruvel was born in Sydney, Australia, in 1959 and he began learning the basics of sculpting at the age of nine before embarking on an artist career that now spans nearly 40 years. If you’re in San Francisco next month you can catch Bruvel’s work at Chloe Gallery starting June 30th, and you can see plenty more right here.

 

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