Photography

Floral X-Rays by Brendan Fitzpatrick

February 27, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Photographer Brendan Fitzpatrick has been shooting photos for over 20 years, and for the last seven has been living and working in Singapore. These colorful floral x-rays were the result of several radiology experiments that ended with help from a radiography lab in Singapore who assisted him with use of a digital x-ray system followed by a few rounds of image editing and color correction in Photoshop to reach the final results you see here. Several of the specimens are available as prints over on Society6. For a polar opposite project, also check out his Anonymous Aliens series, which confronts the dehumanization of transient workers and their often unrecognized contribution to modern society by capturing anonymous stormtroopers enduring the back-breaking labor often performed by migrants.

 

 



Animation Design

Kinetic Rings Mimic the Flight of Birds

February 27, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Kansas-based metalsmith and jeweler Dukno Yoon creates rings, bracelets, and other devices that mimic the movements of birds by harnessing the motion caused by the flick of the wrist or flexing of fingers. Yoon received his BFA from Kookmin University, Seoul and a MFA from Miami University, Oxford, Ohio and most recently has been working on a series of metronomes that also explore the movement of birds. Though I was only able to embed a few of the animated examples of his work above, head over to his Wings gallery to see many more devices in action, the bracelets in particular are really fun to watch.

 


 

 



Amazing

Tilt-Shift Carnaval in Rio de Janeiro

February 26, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Though tilt-shift photography is widely overused these days, this clip by Keith Loutit and Jarbas Agnelli could be one of the best examples of the method I’ve ever seen. Shot during the 2011 Carnival parade in Rio de Janeiro and set to music by Agnelli that evokes Phillip Glass, The City of Samba turns this annual spectacle of staggering scale and proportion into a delightfully miniaturized version that feels as though thousands of toys are tromping through a kitchen cabinet. The parade starts around 2:00 but do yourself a favor: switch it to HD/full-screen, and watch it all the way through. (via vimeo)

 



 

 



Animation Music

Love Is Making Its Way Back Home: A Stop Motion Animation Using 12,000 Sheets of Construction Paper

February 23, 2012

Christopher Jobson

This great new video for Josh Ritter’s Love Is Making Its Way Back Home was directed by Erez Horovitz and involves the meticulous animation of over 12,000 laser-cut pieces of construction paper. Via Etsy:

A team of nearly twenty artists, editors, directors and product assistants ushered the video into being. The group started with storyboarding and computer animation before converting the digital graphics to paper cutouts (frame by frame), photographing those 12,000 cutouts and then stitching them together into four minutes of paper animation.

You can learn more about how it was done and see some great behind the scenes shots on Josh Ritter’s blog. (via etsy)

 

 

 



Photography

Skull Portraits by Carsten Witte

February 22, 2012

Christopher Jobson

A number of decidedly unsettling portraits from Hamburg-based photographer Carsten Witte from his series Intuition (nsfw). Of the series he says: “One main idea behind my work is the belief that everything is constantly changing but photography can preserve the moment. Beauty is almost nothing without the knowledge of how fast it will fade…” (via behance)

 

 



Art

A Condemned House Explodes Onto the Streets of Austin

February 21, 2012

Christopher Jobson

A few days ago I happened upon a rather unique art project called Last New Year in the Austin American Statesman, showing photos of a dilapidated home recently transformed with a number of installations by a small arts collective called Ink Tank. The premise for the project was fascinating: the ensemble imagined a fictional group of people living in the home who would react to the prophesied end-of-times 2012 date. One of my favorite pieces from the show is a giant installation called The Purge by artist Chris Whiteburch who decided to imagine how the house itself would confront the impending doom. The result is a structure purging its contents, all manner of debris and structural material shooting violently through a window into a giant wooden splash.

One of the most fascinating things about this project to me was its similarity to Inversion House, another modified house installation created by sculptors Dan Havel and Dean Ruck in 2005, roughly 150 miles east in Houston. The resemblance is uncanny in that they are essentially exact opposites. Via phone Whiteburch says the similarity is purely coincidental and that he wasn’t even aware of Inversion House until somebody mentioned it after seeing his work. Unfortunately the Last New Year has been taken down, but you can see more images over on Ink Tank’s website. I want to thank both Chris and photographers Julie and Adam Schreiber for providing the imagery for this post.