Art

Human-Powered Clocks by Maarten Baas Physically Mark the Passage of Time

March 14, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Dutch artist Maarten Baas produces artworks that lie at the intersection of visual art, performance, and design, creating manual clocks that are erased and redrawn on the stroke of each minute. In pieces like Grandfather Clock and Schiphol Clock Baas places himself within the structure of the time-telling devices, functioning as the works’ human mechanism. Other pieces from his Real Time series use the assistance of another performer to create 12-hour films, such as a line of perpetually swept trash doubling as a clock arm. Baas began the time-based series in 2009 at the Salone Del Mobile in Milan, Italy, and has a current piece in the group exhibition Design by Time at the Pratt Institute through April 13, 2019. You can see more of his works on his website, Instagram, and Vimeo, and in the videos below.

 

 

 



Art

Colorful Ceramics Accented by Gravity-Defying Drips

March 14, 2019

Anna Marks

Photo courtesy of Bian Xiaodong

Rain falls through the air in smooth curvaceous orbs, instantaneously splitting as it splatters to the ground. Chinese artist Bian Xiaodong’s glossy ceramics resemble these falling droplets, however their inverted forms drip upwards rather than down. The artist crafts his gravity-defying artworks from kaolin clay derived from Jingdezhen —a part of east China’s Jiangxi Province known for its history of crafting porcelain.

After adding the clay to silicone moulds, Bian turns the pieces upside down and lets the natural flow of the clay create a unique shape. In the high-temperature firing process, this ultra-thin clay body further morphs into different forms. Once his ceramics are formed, the artist paints them, using an array of colorful pigments including metallic grey and sunflower yellow. “My work attempts to discover the special texture of ceramic materials, and the beauty that is brought to me by the natural forces,” he explains to Colossal. To view more of Bian’s raindrop-like artworks, visit the China Design Centre’s online gallery.

Photo courtesy of Bian Xiaodong

China Design Centre, photo by Phoebe Guo

China Design Centre, photo by Phoebe Guo

China Design Centre, photo by Phoebe Guo

Photo courtesy of Bian Xiaodong

Photo courtesy of Bian Xiaodong

Photo courtesy of Bian Xiaodong

Photo courtesy of Bian Xiaodong

 

 



Art Illustration

Atmospheric Collages by Art Duo ‘Frank Moth’ Combine Elements from the Past and Future

March 13, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

"Bloom" (2017)

“Bloom” (2017)

Frank Moth is the nom de plume of an anonymous Athens-based art duo. Together the pair creates atmospheric collages that combine elements from vast expanses such as oceans, deserts, and the universe at large. The artists combine these scenic elements with decades-old images of men and women, simultaneously dating the collages and giving them a futuristic feel. Because of this push and pull between the past and present, the pair refer to their work as “nostalgic postcards from a distant but at the same time familiar future.” You can see more of the collaborative’s collage work on Moth’s Instagram and Tumblr, and shop prints in their Society6 store.

"You Will Find Me There Standing Whenever You Want" (2016)

“You Will Find Me There Standing Whenever You Want” (2016)

"Waiting for the Cities to Fade Out Waiting for You" (2015) left, "We Chose This Road My Dear" (2015) right

“Waiting for the Cities to Fade Out Waiting for You” (2015) left, “We Chose This Road My Dear” (2015) right

"Roots" (2019)

“Roots” (2019)

"Lost in Your Memories" (2016)

“Lost in Your Memories” (2016)

"Light Explosions in Our Sky" (2014)

“Light Explosions in Our Sky” (2014)

 

 



Art

Miniature Figures Top Coin Purses, Makeup Compacts, and Teapots in Lush Narrative Scenes by Kendal Murray

March 13, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

"Family Style, Smile" (2012), mixed media assemblage, 11 x 13 x 10 cm

“Family Style, Smile” (2012), mixed media assemblage, 11 x 13 x 10 cm

Kendal Murray works in miniature, crafting assemblages that present familial scenes built into and on top of common items found in the home such as glass tea pots or coin purses. The objects are often covered in fake grass, and present wholesome scenarios—such as a family posing on their car in front of fall foliage, or a man taking a jog through a pasture (while being followed closely by a heard of fluffy sheep). The Sydney, Australia-based artist is currently lecturing in Design at the School of Humanities and Communication Arts at Western Sydney University, and is represented by Arthouse Gallery in New South Wales, Australia. You can see more of her playful sculptures on her website.

"Bird’s Eye View, Blue Sky Debut" (2012), mixed media assemblage, 18 x 13 x 13 cm

“Bird’s Eye View, Blue Sky Debut” (2012), mixed media assemblage, 18 x 13 x 13 cm

"Promised Land, On Hand" (2012), mixed media assemblage, 10 x 8 x 10 cm

“Promised Land, On Hand” (2012), mixed media assemblage, 10 x 8 x 10 cm

"Breakfast Time, Just in Time" (2012), mixed media assemblage, 11 x 13 x 13 cm

“Breakfast Time, Just in Time” (2012), mixed media assemblage, 11 x 13 x 13 cm 

"Exceed Speed, Mislead, Concede" (2012), mixed media assemblage, 18 x 24 x 14 cm

“Exceed Speed, Mislead, Concede” (2012), mixed media assemblage, 18 x 24 x 14 cm

"Fun Run, Dry Run" (2012), mixed media assemblage, 5.5 x 10 x 10 cm

“Fun Run, Dry Run” (2012), mixed media assemblage, 5.5 x 10 x 10 cm

"Fun Run, Dry Run" (2012), mixed media assemblage, 5.5 x 10 x 10 cm

“Fun Run, Dry Run” (2012), mixed media assemblage, 5.5 x 10 x 10 cm

"Earthward, Skyward, Homeward" (2012), mixed media assemblage, 21 x 26 x 16 cm

“Earthward, Skyward, Homeward” (2012), mixed media assemblage, 21 x 26 x 16 cm

 

 



Animation

Over 1,400 Hand-Painted and Drawn Frames Create a Maze of Emotion in a New Music Video for Mitski

March 12, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

For the recent music video for American singer Mitski, designers and animators Saad Moosajee and Danaé Gosset teamed up with creative studio Art Camp to create an animation from 1,480 hand-painted and drawn frames. Pearl follows a single character as she free-falls through a series of scenes, crashing through an ocean to finally land in the same environment where the music video started. 3D renderings merge with traditional mediums such as charcoal, paint, dry pastel, oil pastel, ink, and colored pencils. The result is a swirling and chaotic world that consumes the main character in a wave of adrenaline-pumping emotion. You can see the full video for Pearl below. (via Vimeo Staff Picks)

 

 



Art

Hand-Painted Ceramics of Everyday Objects Inspired by Classical Chinese Paintings

March 11, 2019

Anna Marks

Photo by Wan Liya

Photo by Wan Liya

Chinese artist Wan Liya paints natural sceneries inspired by traditional Chinese paintings onto ceramics of contemporary household items. Soda bottles and soap dispensers become highly decorative objects, blurring the line between traditional and contemporary craft.

Each piece has its own detailed illustration—some feature birds perching upon blossomed trees, while others depict rugged mountainous forms. However, when the objects are arranged together, they compose a larger picture. The images are inspired by Wang Ximeng’s 12th-century painting One Thousand Li of Rivers and Mountains, a large piece depicting mountains and lakes meticulously painted on Chinese silk.

“The idea of this installation work is based on one of the top ten [most classic] paintings in Chinese art history,” says Wan. “The Emperor Song Hui Zong liked [Wang Ximeng] very much and called him into the imperial palace and taught him personally when he was 18 years old. He died when he was 21 years old. Now, this is the only painting by him left.”

Influenced by Wang Ximeng’s skill and craft, Wan Liya reinvents his traditional Chinese style by placing the imagery onto contemporary objects, elevating the meaning and beauty of ordinary, everyday items. To view more of his work visit the China Design Centre’s online gallery and visit Wan’s website.

China Design Centre, photo by Phoebe Guo

China Design Centre, photo by Phoebe Guo

China Design Centre, photo by Phoebe Guo

China Design Centre, photo by Phoebe Guo

Photo by Wan Liya

Photo by Wan Liya

China Design Centre, photo by Phoebe Guo

China Design Centre, photo by Phoebe Guo

Photo by Wan Liya

Photo by Wan Liya

 

 



Art

Frozen Victorian Garments Arranged into a Larger than Life Bouquet by Nicole Dextras

March 11, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Bouquet by Nicole Dextras is a composition of 15 frozen garments reminiscent of a floral arrangement, however the beauty is intended to be both enchanting and foreboding. The alluring collection of Victorian dresses was created to appear more like Venus flytraps rather than to reference romance, and speaks to mythical man-eating trees described in science fiction texts like J. W. Buel’s 1887 text Sea and Land. 

“Today we understand the use of symmetry and patterning in nature as a survival skill,” Dextras tells Colossal. “Birds and flowers in particular seem to go for the ‘big display’ to attract a mate and humans in our vanity, are susceptible to the same spell of wonder. This bouquet however was made with ice; it made its big splash in the wintery forest and within a few days it was gone.”

The collection of frozen garments was created over the course of several days during Dextras’s art residency at Banff Centre in Alberta, Canada. Dextras would spray the forms with water each night when temperatures were at their lowest to build up the right composition of icicles, and bond the garments into one large installation. Like many of her frozen installations, the work leaves no trace and is instead preserved as a subsequent photo series. You can find more of her work on her website, Facebook, and Instagram. (via Hi Fructose)