Art

Balloons Puff and Twist into an Elaborate Inflatable Ensemble by Masayoshi Matsumoto

November 7, 2022

Grace Ebert

A photo of a balloon turkey

All images © Masayoshi Matsumoto, shared with permission

Armed with colorful balloons and plenty of air, Masayoshi Matsumoto (previously) twists and ties a playfully quirky menagerie of inflatable creatures. A chemical engineer by day, the artist spends his off hours stretching the malleable material into a sticky-fingered tree frog or plump squirrel, elevating the creations typically associated with children’s birthday parties or carnivals into elaborate sculptural works.

Matsumoto is loyal to the bendable material and forgoes paints, glues, and other fasteners, and many of the animals accentuate the shape of the balloons themselves: deflated tips resemble claws and puffed oblongs hang like shaggy fur or splay upward like a rooster’s crest.

Find more of the latex animals on the artist’s Instagram and Tumblr, and head to YouTube for tutorials on creating your own characters, as well.

 

A photo of a balloon tree frog

A photo of a balloon rooster

A photo of a balloon cicada

A photo of a balloon bird

A photo of a balloon sea creature

A photo of a balloon squirrel

A photo of a balloon dog

A photo of a balloon bird

A photo of a balloon butterfly

 

 

 

 

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Animation Music

1,300 Oil Paintings Flow Through a Dreamlike Animated Music Video for The Beatles

November 7, 2022

Grace Ebert

London-based animator Em Cooper captures the hazy daze of slipping from wakefulness to slumber in a new music video for The Beatles’ “I’m Only Sleeping.” The short animation stitches together 1,300 oil paintings on celluloid that swirl and twist from one scene of euphoric stupor to the next. “We used to listen to this song on a tape in the car when I was a child,” Cooper told Creative Boom, “and the song itself evokes such a mesmerising, languid, dreamy state. In a way, my job was only to follow its lead with a paintbrush in my hand.”

Originally released in 1966 and now part of the new Revolver: Special Edition album, the harmonic track remains relevant and subversive for its soporific, unhurried approach to modern life, which Cooper echoes in her laborious process of hand-painting every frame. You can find more from the Emmy-nominated animator and director on her site.

 

An animated image of two painted portraits

A painted image of a man sleeping

An animated image of fossils, shoes, lipstick, and oil rigs

A painted image of a hand plucking a guitar

 

 



Craft

Delicate Slivers of Air-Dry Clay Form Breezy, Idyllic Landscapes by Alisa Lariushkina

November 7, 2022

Kate Mothes

A landscape composition by Alisa Lariushkina made from pieces of air-dry clay.

All images © Alisa Lariushkina, shared with permission

One can almost feel the breeze as it swishes through grasslands and ripples streams in the swirling textures of artist Alisa Lariushkina’s bucolic landscapes. Based in Vilnius, the artist draws inspiration from earlier works or from photographs that people share with her. Composed from delicate slivers of air-dry clay, she assembles pieces that subtly shift in size and hue to reflect the sun at different times of day, meadows and flowers that sway in the wind, and the atmosphere of distant mountains. You can follow Lariushkina’s work on Instagram.

 

A landscape composition by Alisa Lariushkina made from pieces of air-dry clay.

A landscape composition by Alisa Lariushkina made from pieces of air-dry clay.  A landscape composition by Alisa Lariushkina made from pieces of air-dry clay.

A landscape composition by Alisa Lariushkina made from pieces of air-dry clay.

A detail of a landscape composition by Alisa Lariushkina made from pieces of air-dry clay.

A detail of a landscape composition by Alisa Lariushkina made from pieces of air-dry clay.

 

 



Design

Shaped Like a Mushroom Cap, This Sustainable Pendant Lamp Is Grown from Fungi

November 7, 2022

Kate Mothes

A pendant lamp made from organic material and textured with mycelium.

All images © Myceen, shared with permission

Fungi isn’t usually something we welcome indoors, but Estonian studio Myceen sees home decoration a bit differently. Focusing on furniture and interior design products, the team has found an enlightening application for mycelium, the fibrous root-like system produced by fungus that spreads below the Earth’s surface and gathers nutrients. “B-Wise” is a sustainably-grown pendant lamp (you read that right!) that combines one of nature’s most resilient materials with recycled byproducts into a light fixture that looks like it was just plucked from the soil.

The production of each piece begins with combining organic waste materials like sawdust and straw into a mold along with the mycelium, giving the organism five weeks’ worth of food to promote expansion. After that, the lampshade is removed from the mold and dehydrated to prevent any further growth.

You can see more work from Myceen on its website and on Instagram. (via Yanko Design)

 

A pendant lamp made from organic material and textured with mycelium.

A pendant lamp made from organic material and textured with mycelium.

A pendant lamp made from organic material and textured with mycelium.

A pendant lamp made from organic material and textured with mycelium.

 

 



Art

Dried Flowers Are Arranged into Passageways and Processions in Installations by Rebecca Louise Law

November 5, 2022

Kate Mothes

An installation by Rebecca Louise Law made of thousands of fried flowers suspended from the ceiling.

“The Womb” (2019), Frederik Meijer Gardens and Sculpture Park. All images © Rebecca Louise Law, shared with permission. Photograph by Chuck Heiney

For millennia, dried flowers have been prepared for a vast array of uses ranging from decoration and fragrance to pigments and medicine. British artist Rebecca Louise Law taps into our perennial fascination with florals for her monumental, immersive installations. Exploring our relationship with the natural environment and the way blooms and botanicals have influenced cultures throughout history, her reinterpretations of existing architecture encourage the viewer to move around the space in a new way.

In Parma, she draws inspiration from the city’s culinary and medicinal history for “Florilegum,” and in Brittany, France, she was invited to reimagine the Château de la Roche-Jagu’s grand banquet hall. For “The Womb,” visitors walked inside a room delineated by delicate strands of flowers and approached a cocoon-like form in the center, suggesting a space that is simultaneously protective, potent, and fragile. By hand-sewing stems and fronds together and wrapping them carefully in thin wire, she constructs lengthy ribbons of foliage that can be draped from a framework to create long, curtain-like expanses or colorful volumes at various heights.

You can visit “Florilegium” at Chiesa di San Tiburzio in Parma, Italy, and “Awakening” at the Honolulu Museum of Art will be on view through September 10, 2023. Explore more of Law’s work on her website and follow updates on Instagram.

 

An installation by Rebecca Louise Law in the dining hall of a château.

“Banquet” (2019), La Roche Jagu, France. Photograph by Julien Mota

An installation by Rebecca Louise Law made of thousands of fried flowers suspended from the ceiling.

“Florilegium” (2020), Chiesa di San Tiburzio, Parma, Italy

An installation by Rebecca Louise Law made of thousands of fried flowers suspended from the ceiling.

“Florilegium”

An installation by Rebecca Louise Law made of flowers in the interior of a French château.

“Banquet” (2019), La Roche Jagu, France. Photograph by Julien Mota

An installation by Rebecca Louise Law made of thousands of fried flowers suspended from the ceiling.

“Awakening” (2022), Honolulu Museum of Art

An installation by Rebecca Louise Law made of thousands of fried flowers suspended from the ceiling.

Detail of “Awakening”

Two detail images of dried flowers.

Details of “Awakening”

An installation by Rebecca Louise Law made of thousands of fried flowers suspended from the ceiling and a person standing amongst them.

Detail of “Awakening”

A sculpture by Rebecca Louise Law made of dried flowers, illuminated from the top.

Detail of “The Womb.” Photograph by Chuck Heiney

 

 



Photography Science

Photographer Levon Biss Illuminates the Strange, Otherworldly Chrysalises of Butterfly Pupae

November 4, 2022

Grace Ebert

A photo of 30 butterfly pupae

All images © Levon Biss, shared with permission

A photographer known for using the macro to investigate the micro, Levon Biss (previously) continues his explorations into the vast world of entomology. His recent butterfly pupae series centers on “the diversity of design and form” through illuminating portraits of approximately 30 specimens as they undergo metamorphosis and complete the final, most vulnerable stage of the transition from adolescence to adulthood.

Otherworldly and bordering on the bizarre, many of the chrysalises have evolved to be deceptive in appearance, acting as necessary camouflage from potential predators by impersonating nearby plants and surroundings: some mimic the natural, like those that imitate a rotting plantain or mossy hunk of bark, while others are more artful, like those spotted with Kusama-esque dots or cloaked in a mirrored gold coating. The photographs are “intended to be both entertaining and educational,” Biss shares, “allowing the viewer to appreciate the diversity in the subject whilst appreciating the intricate details that evolution has created.”

Pick up a print of the unearthly images, and find more from the collection on Biss’s site and Instagram. If you’re in New York, you can also see his Extinct and Endangered series at the American Museum of Natural History.

 

A photo of a butterfly pupa that looks like a plantain

A photo of a butterfly pupa with black dots

Two photos of green butterfly pupae

A photo of a butterfly pupa that looks like mossy bark

Two photos of butterfly pupae that are brown and green

A photo of a butterfly pupa that looks like mirrored gold