Art

A Skeleton of Found Roots and Tree Limbs Heralds the Beginning of Fall in Italy

September 28, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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In this 2012 installation, street artist Never2501 assembled a variety of found vegetation to form an eerie skeleton at the base of some steps in the idyllic gardens of the Museo Archeologico Paolo Giovio in Como, Italy. The piece was titled “In Cammino Per Trasformarsi Nell’istante Presente” (Moving to Transform into the Present) and could be interpreted as a harbinger of the seasons with the decaying root stumps and limbs pulled from a nearby forest, fit together without aid of any additional materials. Or maybe it’s just an incredibly disturbing thing to stumble onto when walking through the woods? You can see more photos of the temporary piece here, and follow Never2501’s more recent work on Instagram. (via This Isn’t Happiness, StreetArtNews)

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Craft Design

Balloon Pin House by Clive Roddy

September 28, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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This fun new pin cushion by UK designer Clive Roddy promises to elevate your pushpin storage in a manner reminiscent of the Pixar film Up. The tiny wooden house with a large cork sphere can sit on a desk or mount to a cork-board or wall for easy storage. Currently available in his online shop.

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Art Craft Food

Embroidered Bread Slices by Terezia Krnacova Combine Food and Textile Art

September 27, 2016

Christopher Jobson

In this fun series of six embroideries, Slovakia-based artist Terézia Krnáčová brought needle to bread as a way to combine her need for food and textile artwork, a somewhat literal expression of things that sustain her. Titled Everyday Bread the work incorporates a slice of bread for each day of the week in a different design, with the 7th slice remaining plain in honor of the sabbath. You can explore more of her sculptural and textile work on Behance. (via iGNANT)

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Design Science

A “Quick Perspective” on the Scale of the Manmade and Natural Marvels That Surround Us

September 27, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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If the Willis Tower (1,729 ft) was placed into Russia’s Mir Mine, the tip would only stick out 7 feet past ground level. (All images via Kevin Wisbeth)

College student Kevin Wisbeth, creator of the Youtube series “A Quick Perspective,” puts size in layman’s terms for those who might not be able to conceptualize the true width of a B-2 Bomber’s wings, or understand the immense depth of Russia’s largest mine. Wisbeth digitally composes manmade structures and natural wonders to put into context each of their sizes, seamlessly fitting the world’s largest oil tanker into New York’s Central Park and hovering the M-1 Rocket motor just above a Smart Car.

You can watch the digital presentations of Wisbeth’s comparisons on his Youtube channel. (via Quipsologies)

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If the Seawise Giant (1,504 ft), the largest oil tanker ever produced, was placed into the main lake in New York City’s Central Park, it would only have 350 feet of extra room in the front and back of the tanker.

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The Burj Khalifa is currently the tallest standing structure in the world (almost measuring 2,722 feet tall). If placed in New York City, it would stretch almost 1,000 feet past the One World Trade center and almost 1,300 feet taller than the Empire State Building.

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If the Titanic (882 ft) was placed on the deck of the U.S.S. Ronald Reagan, the ship would have 210 feet of deck room left.

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The B-2 Bomber is one of the most advanced and most expensive airplanes in the world. The wingspan of a B-2 is 172 feet, which is 12 feet wider than an NFL football field.

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Prehistoric bugs were larger than average day bugs due to the higher oxygen levels. The Pulmonoscorpius kirktonensis was a species of scorpion that grew to 24 inches long, or the size of a normal house cat.

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The M-1 Rocket motor was designed back in the 1950s for the NASA space program and would have been the biggest motor ever built had it been constructed. It’s designed diameter was 14 feet, or wide enough to fully cover a Smart Car with 2 feet to spare on either side.

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The Death Star’s estimated width is around 99 miles across, or around 1/4th the length of Florida.

 

 



Design

New Kinetic Sand Drawing Tables by Bruce Shapiro

September 26, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Bruce Shapiro (previously) has transformed the tools that create sculpture into the sculpture itself, using CNC machines to produce tables that trace beautiful patterns in thin layers of sand. Shapiro named this kinetic art project Sisyphus, an appropriate title as the metal balls that move through each table’s sand seems to be forever rolling and creating patterns, much like the Greek myth.

Shapiro has been producing the Sisyphus sculptures for almost 20 years, and has permanent installations of his works in Switzerland, Germany, and Australia. Desiring the works to also live in individual homes, he has created a Kickstarter to begin production on three different types of smaller, domestic tables: an end table, three-foot metal coffee table, and a four-foot hardwood coffee table.

“Over time I have come to view Sisyphus as more than a kinetic art piece: it is an instrument,” said Shapiro. “As a musical instrument plays songs, Sisyphus plays paths. My goal with this Kickstarter is to get Sisyphus into people’s homes for them to enjoy as both furniture and art, but also, to inspire a community of composers to write ‘music’ for it.”

You can view Shaprio’s other artworks, including his projects that utilize computerized motion control, on his website.

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Art History

Elaborate Bronze Memorial Dedicated to Staten Island Ferry Octopus Attack Tricks Tourists

September 26, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Monuments and vaguely descriptive plaques are commonplace around cities and heavily trafficked tourist areas, giving just enough insight into an historic event or landmark. The Staten Island Ferry Disaster Memorial blends in with these weathered monuments, except for the fact that all details on the work are completely false. The monument, which is located in Battery Park, Manhattan, was created by artist Joe Reginella and honors the 400 victims who perished during a giant octopus attack of a Staten Island ferry named the Cornelius G. Kolff on November 22, 1963, the same day as the assassination of JFK.

The elaborate hoax was six months in the making, and is also seen by Reginella as a multimedia art project and social experiment. The website, and fliers distributed around Manhattan by his team, give a false location for a museum, ironically a place you must get to by ferry. You can see more tourist reactions and find real information about the fake event on the Staten Island Ferry Octopus Disaster Memorial Museum’s Facebook. (via Hi-Fructose)

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