Art Illustration

Ceramic Dishes Drawn as Rippling Pools of Culture by Brendan Lee Satish Tang

March 17, 2019

Andrew LaSane

Untitled (Spode) 2012

For his “Swimmers” print series, artist Brendan Lee Satish Tang transformed traditional blue and white ceramic dishware patterns into a symbol for culture: the complex, learned, and shared pool that surrounds us all. Each intricately drawn work features two swimmers (parental figures and children, siblings, and peers) who are seemingly unaffected as they attempt to navigate the rippling waters together.

“Untitled (Ming 1)” 2012

Born in Ireland to Trinidadian parents, Tang received a formal art education in the United States and in Canada, where he is a naturalized citizen. He has lectured at conferences and academic institutions across North America, and his work has been exhibited and collected at museums and galleries across both nations. Currently based in Vancouver, Tang works primarily in clay to explore themes of tradition and culture with a particular interest in cultural appropriation and hybridity, which he says reflects his own “ambiguous cultural identity.”

The crosshatching and subdued blue tone give Tang’s drawings a sketch-like quality, while the morphing of the ceramic waves show a deeper level of planning and precision. A play on the idiom “a fish out of water,” Tang writes on his website that “we are the fish,” adding that humankind is “always finding our way through our greater culture.” Brendan Lee Satish Tang is represented by Gallery Jones in Vancouver and Elizabeth Leach Gallery in Portland. Check out his website to see where he will be showing next, and follow him on Instagram for closer looks at his latest work.

“Untitled (Delftse Pauw)” 2012

“Untitled (Ming 2)” 2012

“Untitled (Royal Delft)” 2012

 

 



Art Illustration

Loneliness and Belonging Explored in a New Children’s Book of Poetry and Mixed-Media Illustrations

March 16, 2019

Andrew LaSane

Images courtesy of Enchanted Lion

Author JonArno Lawson and artist Nahid Kazemi recently collaborated to tell a largely visual story about a young bird contemplating its own existence and trying to find its place in the world after losing its flock. Titled Over the Rooftops, Under the Moon and published by Brooklyn-based Enchanted Lion Books, the children’s book features poetic writing by Lawson which provides the framework for its complex themes. Kazemi’s colorful illustrations—a mix of pencil, colored pencil, chalk pastel, and collage—pull young readers into the colorful and curious world.

After studying painting at Art University in Tehran, Kazemi worked as a graphic designer for literary magazines, published children’s books in Iran, and participated in illustration festivals around the world. Kazemi tells Colossal that the collaboration with JonArno Lawson happened by chance, shortly after a move and career restart in Canada.

While looking through books at a library for publishers and authors, the artist came across one called Sidewalk Flowers. “It made me hopeful that publishers in North America were interested in publishing wordless books,” she said. “I searched for JonArno’s other books in the library and felt that his work was close to my own style. I found him through social media – he really liked my work as well, and after a short while, we started to think together about this project.”

The new book is available now on Amazon. To see more of Kazemi’s mixed media illustrations, follow her on Instagram. (via Brain Pickings)

 

 



Design

A Multi-Level Pedestrian Vessel Designed by Heatherwick Studio Opens at Hudson Yards

March 15, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

All images by Michael Moran for Related Companies

Thomas Heatherwick’s new copper-colored structure at New York City’s Hudson Yards exists somewhere between a building and a pavilion, yet is classified by neither title. The open-air structure, which is temporarily nicknamed as “Vessel,” is a maze of 154 crossing stairwells and 80 landings that combine to form a honeycomb-like shape. Although the towering design appears like a sculptural work, the architects behind the project view it more as a piece of furniture than piece of architecture.

“People often ask us, what is this for? Is it a viewing platform? Where are you looking to?” Heatherwick Studio group leader and partner Stuart Wood explains in Dezeen. “It’s not a building, it’s not a sculpture, it’s not an artwork, and yet it has scale and relevance to all of those typologies… In a way, we’re thinking of this as a piece of furniture. Its ongoing use will evolve, quite naturally.”

The structure is narrow at the bottom to avoid a large footprint, and expands to a width of 150 feet wide at the top. It opened yesterday alongside a plaza and gardens and phase one of the surrounding complex’s retail and entertainment. You can reserve free timed tickets to climb the structure on Hudson Yard’s website starting today. (via Dezeen)

All images by Michael Moran for Related Companies

 

 



Design

Japanese Monster Figurines Apologize For Their Destruction at Press Conference Podiums

March 15, 2019

Johnny Waldman

The art of the apology – it’s an integral part of Japanese culture that helps maintain balance and harmony in society. Combining that with kaiju figurines is this brilliant little set of toys that feature the likes of Godzilla and Mechagodzilla apologizing at a press conference, head hanging solemnly, for the destruction they’ve caused.

The toys were released back in 2016 as part of a promotion campaign for the Shin-Godzilla movie. They were sold as gachapon and retailed for 300 yen each.

They included Godzilla apologizing for destructive vandalism (破壊行為), Mechagodzilla for imitation and copyright infringement (模倣行為) and King Gidra for aggressive invasion (侵略行為). The toys have since been taken off the primary market but for those willing to pay up, they’re available on the secondary market, albeit at a 500+% markup. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

 

 



Art

Human-Powered Clocks by Maarten Baas Physically Mark the Passage of Time

March 14, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Dutch artist Maarten Baas produces artworks that lie at the intersection of visual art, performance, and design, creating manual clocks that are erased and redrawn on the stroke of each minute. In pieces like Grandfather Clock and Schiphol Clock Baas places himself within the structure of the time-telling devices, functioning as the works’ human mechanism. Other pieces from his Real Time series use the assistance of another performer to create 12-hour films, such as a line of perpetually swept trash doubling as a clock arm. Baas began the time-based series in 2009 at the Salone Del Mobile in Milan, Italy, and has a current piece in the group exhibition Design by Time at the Pratt Institute through April 13, 2019. You can see more of his works on his website, Instagram, and Vimeo, and in the videos below.

 

 

 



Art

Colorful Ceramics Accented by Gravity-Defying Drips

March 14, 2019

Anna Marks

Photo courtesy of Bian Xiaodong

Rain falls through the air in smooth curvaceous orbs, instantaneously splitting as it splatters to the ground. Chinese artist Bian Xiaodong’s glossy ceramics resemble these falling droplets, however their inverted forms drip upwards rather than down. The artist crafts his gravity-defying artworks from kaolin clay derived from Jingdezhen —a part of east China’s Jiangxi Province known for its history of crafting porcelain.

After adding the clay to silicone moulds, Bian turns the pieces upside down and lets the natural flow of the clay create a unique shape. In the high-temperature firing process, this ultra-thin clay body further morphs into different forms. Once his ceramics are formed, the artist paints them, using an array of colorful pigments including metallic grey and sunflower yellow. “My work attempts to discover the special texture of ceramic materials, and the beauty that is brought to me by the natural forces,” he explains to Colossal. To view more of Bian’s raindrop-like artworks, visit the China Design Centre’s online gallery.

Photo courtesy of Bian Xiaodong

China Design Centre, photo by Phoebe Guo

China Design Centre, photo by Phoebe Guo

China Design Centre, photo by Phoebe Guo

Photo courtesy of Bian Xiaodong

Photo courtesy of Bian Xiaodong

Photo courtesy of Bian Xiaodong

Photo courtesy of Bian Xiaodong

 

 



Art Illustration

Atmospheric Collages by Art Duo ‘Frank Moth’ Combine Elements from the Past and Future

March 13, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

"Bloom" (2017)

“Bloom” (2017)

Frank Moth is the nom de plume of an anonymous Athens-based art duo. Together the pair creates atmospheric collages that combine elements from vast expanses such as oceans, deserts, and the universe at large. The artists combine these scenic elements with decades-old images of men and women, simultaneously dating the collages and giving them a futuristic feel. Because of this push and pull between the past and present, the pair refer to their work as “nostalgic postcards from a distant but at the same time familiar future.” You can see more of the collaborative’s collage work on Moth’s Instagram and Tumblr, and shop prints in their Society6 store.

"You Will Find Me There Standing Whenever You Want" (2016)

“You Will Find Me There Standing Whenever You Want” (2016)

"Waiting for the Cities to Fade Out Waiting for You" (2015) left, "We Chose This Road My Dear" (2015) right

“Waiting for the Cities to Fade Out Waiting for You” (2015) left, “We Chose This Road My Dear” (2015) right

"Roots" (2019)

“Roots” (2019)

"Lost in Your Memories" (2016)

“Lost in Your Memories” (2016)

"Light Explosions in Our Sky" (2014)

“Light Explosions in Our Sky” (2014)

 

 

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