Art

Layers of Crocheted Fabric Drape Across a Large-Scale Inflatable Installation Inside of Paris’s Le Bon Marché

March 2, 2019

Andrew LaSane

“Simone” (2019), Handmade woolen crochet, fabrics, ornaments, LED, polyester, inflatable, fans, microcontrollers, power supply unit, steel cables. Image: Gabriel de la Chapelle/Courtesy Le Bon Marché

Portuguese artist Joana Vasconcelos (previously) recently installed a large site-specific inflatable installation covered with crocheted fabric and embellishments inside of Paris’ oldest department store, Le Bon Marché. The suspended two-part work, titled “Simone,” is the latest in the artist’s Valkyries series, and takes inspiration from the female figures in Norse mythology.

Named for French human rights activists Simone du Beauvoir and Simone Weil, the large piece features two orb-like structures that loom over visitors along the store’s perimeter, and is connected by tentacles that weave around the building’s iconic escalators. The inflatable is dressed in fabric with handmade crocheted details that dangle from its limbs to give it the appearance of an alien chandelier. Color-changing LEDs are also embedded throughout the work and pulse rhythmically, which gives the strange being the entrancing power of a bioluminescent deep sea organism.

Vasconcelos tells Colossal that like the winged-horse riders, the works in her Valkyries series “are both warrior and protective creatures, in the way they attack and contaminate yet adapt and engage with the spaces they inhabit.” To see more of the artist’s work, follow her on Instagram and Facebook.

Luís Vasconcelos/Courtesy Unidade Infinita Projectos

Luís Vasconcelos/Courtesy Unidade Infinita Projectos

Luís Vasconcelos/Courtesy Unidade Infinita Projectos

Gabriel de la Chapelle/Courtesy Le Bon Marché

Gabriel de la Chapelle/Courtesy Le Bon Marché

Gabriel de la Chapelle/Courtesy Le Bon Marché

Gabriel de la Chapelle/Courtesy Le Bon Marché

 

 



Craft

Balloon Birds by Terry Cook Mimic Their Real-Life Counterparts

March 1, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Passing up the typical party tricks of dogs, flowers, and hats, Terry Cook riffs on classic balloon-twisting shapes with his avian creations. After modeling herons, blue tits, mallards, and other European birds, Cook completes the picture by staging and photographing each animal in its natural setting. The artist makes a point of explaining on his website that he carefully removes and deflates all balloons after his photo shoots as to not leave latex debris in the natural world. In addition to his balloon birds, Cook also works with watercolor, acrylic, ink, and even robotics. You can see more of the Aberdeen, Scotland-based artist’s in-progress and finished projects on Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art

Bonsai Tree and Sea Creature Sculptures Crafted from Blown Glass by Simone Crestani

March 1, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Glass artist Simone Crestani uses borosilicate glass with a lampworking technique to create detailed glass sculptures. Each piece imitates imperfect organic forms such as twisting Japanese bonsai trees or lopsided coral. Bonsai is an ongoing theme Crestani often returns to, and views as being a base of his studio practice. “The bonsai is a concentration of life, it overcomes the barrier of size and expresses strength and energy; it is a work of art that is never finished, in which nature continues to develop and evolve,” he explains on his website. “I shape the [glass], but the end result has an identity of its own. I help it to grow, and wait until it gives me an indication of the equilibrium that will allow it to express itself.” You can see more of his glass-based designs, which also include bubbles, bugs, and unusual glasses, on Instagram. (via designboom)

 

 



Art

Children and Animals Commune Within Neglected Landscapes in New Paintings by Kevin Peterson

February 28, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

For several years artist Kevin Peterson (previously) has created paintings that occupy the same fictionalized world. His imagined environments are occupied by children and animals— individuals band together as they navigate depleted urban environments. The works pair the innocence of its subjects against a broken and crumbling world, addressing the various journeys we each take through life.

Recently, Peterson has begun to paint just the animals in these scenes, rather than pairing them exclusively with children. “In my head, it’s the same world,” the Houston-based painter tells Colossal, “the animals and kids just haven’t met up yet. Maybe they’re searching for each other.” His solo exhibition Wild opens at Thinkspace Projects in Culver City, California on March 2, 2019 and continues through March 23, 2019. You can see more of his paintings on his website and Instagram. (via booooooom)

 

 



Aerial Photographer Kevin Krautgartner Uses Squarespace to Showcase the Earth’s Fragile Beauty

February 28, 2019

Colossal

Island Sunsets

While those of us in the northern hemisphere eagerly await the arrival of spring, photographer Kevin Krautgartner travels the world capturing envy-inducing views. Krautgartner focuses his lens on a wide array of subjects, ranging from architectural interiors to soaring urban skylines. But the German photographer’s most wanderlust-inspiring images are shot from the sky in sunny, rugged, and remote landscapes. Recent work has taken him to the Seychelles islands, Italy’s Dolomite mountains, and the glacial rivers of Iceland.

The artist studied at University of Applied Sciences in Dortmund, Germany, and shares with Colossal that his dual academic training in photography and graphic design has informed his work as a professional photographer. He uses formal tenets of design to create tension through lines and forms, and he explains that he finds himself almost automatically drawn to scenes based on their compositional makeup.

Krautgartner explains that his design finesse makes Squarespace the perfect platform for showcasing his work online. Squarespace’s themes and customization options allow him to create the exact environment he wants for his work, down to custom fonts. He cites the ease of use and high-quality customer support that allow him to focus on his creative projects. Krautgartner also puts his creativity to work by selling fine art prints of his photographs using Squarespace’s seamless e-commerce integration. “The easy to set up e-commerce system allows me to present my prints in a high quality in just a few minutes. And I’m able to offer my photographs in different variations, so the customer can choose a print on different materials as well as in different sizes.”

In his gallery-ready images, Krautgartner deftly captures atmospheric conditions, conveying the warm, clear air of tropical climates, as well as the grey, damp essence of cooler regions. Rippling ocean waves, transitioning trees in autumn, craggy bare rocks, and the verdant foliage of palm trees add textural elements to the photographer’s carefully composed images.  Whether shooting with a drone or from a chartered aircraft, aerial photography allows the artist to capture moments of surprise and awe. “You never know what to expect when you are going up in the air. I think I have the responsibility to remind as many people as I can how beautiful nature is, and how important it is for us to think about what we do with our land and what impact human intervention has.”

Want to share your unique view of the world? Get started with a portfolio or e-commerce site today on Squarespace.com with a commitment-free 14-day trial. When you’re ready to launch, use the offer code COLOSSAL at checkout for 10% off your purchase.

Yallingup

Seychelles

Southern Waves

Autumn in the Dolomites

Nature’s Colors

Glacier Rivers

First Light on the Island

This post was sponsored by Squarespace. 

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Amazing Food

Endless Layers of Colorful Candy Melt Away in a Satisfying Timelapse Video

February 27, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

The creators of the Let’s Melt This YouTube channel are anonymous connoisseurs of melting, having put a torch to everything from flat screen TVs to hamburgers. They put a classic candy to the test, using a 1900°F blow torch to melt a famously long-lasting giant jawbreaker candy ball. The task took 3 minutes and 46 seconds, and the video itself is sped up to about a minute and a half to show the satisfying removal of colorful layers. The graffiti-splattered white coating gives way to layers of vibrant orange, yellow, blue, green, and red as the candy steadily shrinks. Let’s Melt This has been less active of late, but you can explore their archive of melts on their YouTube channel. (via The Awesomer)

 

 

 



Illustration

Fantasies and Fears Surround the Beds of Illustrated Characters by Virginia Mori

February 27, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

We love the illustrations of Italian artist Virginia Mori (previously) who adds a subtle hint of dark humor to her quirky illustrations of young women and men. Recently the artist has been drawing scenes that revolve around the unconscious thoughts that spring to life while in bed. Each illustration presents an improbable or unique vision of a bedroom—from a bed composed of live grass, to another balanced on the tips of four trees. The illustrations seem to peek into her subjects’ dreams, projecting their hidden hopes or fears onto their surroundings as they slumber. You can see more of her work on her website, and keep updated with future exhibitions on Instagram and Facebook.