Art

A Gigantic Helium-Filled and Charcoal-Studded Sphere Covers Rooms with Unpredictable Designs

May 30, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Polish-German artist Karina Smigla-Bobinski gives buoyancy to the act of drawing with ADA, a large inflatable drawing tool. Filled with helium, ADA floats freely, making lines with its charcoal spikes as it moves through a room. More dramatic mark-making starts to occur when humans are added to the mix: the video above shows visitors engaging with ADA at Muffathalle where it was installed for a week in Munich, Germany.

The artist describes ADA in a statement: “The globe put in action fabricates a composition of lines and points, which remain incalculable in their intensity, expression, and form however hard the visitor tries to control ADA, to drive her, to domesticate her. Whatever he tries out, he would notice very soon, that ADA is an independent performer, studding the originally white walls with drawings and signs.”

Smigla-Bobinski categorizes ADA as biotechnology and pays homage to past creatives that have designed computer-like works, which give unpredictable outputs once given a command. She mentions Ada Lovelace, Jean Tinguely, and Vannevar Bush as influences.

The artist studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Krakow and Munich. Her work, which ranges from kinetic sculptures to multimedia theater performances, has been shown in forty five countries. ADA made its debut at the Electronic Language Int. Festival in São Paulo, in 2011, and has since traveled the world. You can see more from Smigla-Bobinski on her website and YouTube channel.

 

 



Animation

The Pits: An Endearing Short Film Follows a Lonely Avocado Searching NYC for its Other Half

May 30, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

In an awww-inducing short film written by David Bizzaro and directed by Mike Hayhurst, a fuzzy little avocado puppet wanders the streets of New York City looking for its missing half and pit. Tinkling piano music and classic New York shots of changing leaves, fast-driving taxis, and charming parks lend a rom-com feel to this fruit-forward film about searching for one’s mate. (via The Kid Should See This)

 

 



Art

A Skeletal Wooden Kraken Climbs From Remote Ruins in France

May 30, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

French artist Thomas Voillaume, a.k.a. APACH, likes to mix his background in sculpture and video to 3D map digital works onto larger-than-life public sculptures in urban environments. For his 2016 sculpture The Kraken however, the artist decided to construct the work with a more minimal approach. The piece is an open wooden structure built into the ruins of Val d’Escrein, a remote valley in Hautes-Alpes, France. Its body is situated at the center of the stone building, while its six pointed legs reach over the crumbling walls.

Voillaume’s work is one of three monumental installations scattered throughout the region, including eleven illuminated dandelion sculptures formed from clusters of milk bottles by Alice and David Bertizzolo and a giant wooden hand by Pedro Marzorati. You can take a look at more of Voillaume’s work on his website and Instagram, and view a behind-the-scenes video of The Kraken’s construction (with horses!) in the video below. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art

Fierce Feathered Portraits of Brooding Birds by Josie Morway

May 29, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Artist Josie Morway creates fierce portraits of wildlife set in abstracted apocalyptic environments and interspersed with geometric linework, colorful paint drips, and mysterious Latin text. Morway often features birds in her oil and enamel paintings, using the graceful shapes of the animals’ elongated necks and sweeping wings to draw the viewer’s eye around the artwork. Many of Morway’s works also interweave plants: ferns, succulents, and blossoming flowers emerge from around her animal subjects’ bodies.

The artist shares with Colossal that the Latin lettering that embellishes some of her paintings is heavily abstracted from old mottos. “I don’t mean for them to be read too literally, but rather hope they lend a certain feeling of portentousness to the pieces,” Morway explains. “I like referencing religious icon paintings and other forms of ‘serious’ historic painting, but using animals and birds in the place of saints, etc. I’m going for the feeling of narrative realism, but working with a narrative that’s mysterious, missing some information, open to the viewer’s interpretation.”

Morway will have a piece on view at Antler Gallery in Portland starting June 9, 2018, as part of PDX/LAX II, a collaborative exhibit with Los Angeles gallery Thinkspace Projects, as well as a two person show in October. You can also find her work in Australia at Beinart Gallery’s group show starting July 13. The artist shares updates on her work via Instagram.

 

 



Design

Contemporary Takes on Cuckoo Clocks by Guido Zimmerman Resemble Brutalist Block Buildings

May 29, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

German multidisciplinary artist Guido Zimmermann reinterprets the iconic German cuckoo clock using examples of modern architecture. The artist notes that while “the classic cuckoo clock stands for the prosperity of the middle class and counts as a kind of luxury for the staid home, the updated version as a panel construction shows today’s urban and social life in apartment blocks.”

Zimmermann drew on specific examples of modern architecture to create his sculptural “Cuckoo Blocks,” including the Glenkerry House by Brutalist architect Ernő Goldfinger and Bauhaus architect Marcel Breuer’s Flaine hotel. Grids of windows peek out of flat concrete surfaces, with contemporary details such as satellite dishes and cactus houseplants.

The artist studied at the Academy of Visual Arts in his native city of Frankfurt, where he currently lives and works. You can see more of Zimmermann’s diverse projects, including paintings and murals, on his website, as well as on Instagram and Facebook.

 

 



Art

The Magnetic Force of Urs Fischer’s Life-Size Metallic Rhinoceros

May 29, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

URS FISCHER, "Things" (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Robert McKeever. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, “Things” (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Robert McKeever. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

Things stands poised as the singular sculpture in a new installation by Swiss artist Urs Fischer, yet like its title might suggest, the lone work is composed of several disparate parts. At the piece’s core stands a life-size aluminum copy of a rhinoceros with a magnetic presence that has attracted several man-made objects into its grand orbit. A vacuum cleaner, step stool, toilet, car door, and frying pan all cling to its wrinkled metallic skin.

The work questions one’s attraction to and use of everyday objects, considering how and what we accumulate as we move through our individualized worlds. “‘Art’ has always been a word for this thing that can’t be rationalized, when you see or hear something that you struggle to explain,” says Fischer in a press release about Things. “But that’s its strength, of course.”

The massive aluminum work is on view at a disused bank at 511 Fifth Avenue in midtown Manhattan through June 23, 2018. This installation coincides with Fischer’s exhibition of new paintings titled Sōtatsu, which also runs through June 23 at Gagosian Gallery's 980 Madison Avenue location. (via The New York Times)

URS FISCHER, "Things" (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, “Things” (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, "Things" (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, “Things” (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, "Things" (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, “Things” (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, "Things" (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, “Things” (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, "Things" (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, “Things” (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

 

 

 



Art

Hand-Dyed Crocheted Thread Carefully Covers Eggs, Seeds, and Tree Trunks

May 25, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Esther Traugot connects to the natural world by collecting and covering seed pods, eggs, severed tree trunks, and other natural objects in tightly-wrapped textile “skins.” She uses hand-dyed gold threads to crochet around these objects in order to temporarily mend what has previously been broken or abandoned. Through her work Traugot straddles the line of nurture and control, investigating her dual role as a member and observer of the natural landscape.

“The meticulous act of crocheting mimics the instinct to nurture and protect what is viable, what is becoming precious,” she explains in an artist statement. “As in gilding, these false ‘skins’ imbue the objects with an assumed desirability or value; the wrapping becomes an act of veneration. Although futile in its attempt at archiving and preservation, it suggests optimism.”

Traugot is interested in “contemporary naturalism,” or artwork that cares for the environment in our current global ecological state, and also views her work in conversation with Land and Environmental Art and Feminism. She received her BFA from the University of California Berkeley in 2005 and her MFA from Mills College in 2009. Traugot is represented by Chandra Cerrito Contemporary Gallery in Oakland, California, and currently lives and works in Sebastopol, CA. You can view more of her gold threaded objects on her website.

 

 

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