Craft Design

Reboot Your Nostalgia: Make Your Own Paper Models of Retro Computers and Games

November 30, 2022

Grace Ebert

A photo of a paper model of a retro computer

All images © Rocky Bergen

Designer Rocky Bergen folds us back into the world of dialup and floppy disks with a delightfully retro collection of paper computers and gaming systems. His DIY models faithfully recreate classic technology like the first Apple II complete with Oregon Trail or the more obscure IMSAI 8080 system and multiple Commodore platforms. Print, score, cut, and reconnect with bygone tech using Bergen’s 20 free downloadable templates. (via Present & Correct)

 

A photo of a paper model of a retro computer

A photo of a paper model of a retro computer

A photo of a paper model of a retro computer

A photo of a paper model of a retro computer

A photo of a paper model of a retro game system

A photo of a paper model of a retro game system

A photo of a paper model of a retro boombox

 

 

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Art Craft

Vivid Hues and Intricate Embroidery Bring Yumi Okita’s Remarkably Tactile Moths to Life

November 30, 2022

Kate Mothes

A photograph of an embroidered, life-like moth.

All images © Yumi Okita

In vividly colored thread and textiles, Yumi Okita imbues remarkably tactile moths and butterflies with lifelike features. The North Carolina-based artist designs each specimen to perch on its own delicate wire legs, and some of the larger creatures boast wing spans nearly 10 inches wide. Long fascinated by the natural world, she portrays the insects’ intricate detail, innate fragility, and sublime patterns in embroidery thread, faux fur, feathers, and layers of dyed fabric.

Okita often sells her sculptures in her Etsy shop and is currently exploring the theme of nature further in a series of botanical designs, which she has begun sharing on Instagram.

 

A photograph of an embroidered, life-like moth held in a hand.

A photograph of an embroidered, life-like moth.

A photograph of an embroidered, life-like moth.

A photograph of an embroidered, life-like moth.

A photograph of an embroidered, life-like moth.

A photograph of an embroidered, life-like moth.

A photograph of an embroidered, life-like moth.

A photograph of an embroidered, life-like moth.

A photograph of an embroidered, life-like moth.

 

 



Art

Animals of Translucent Botanics Center in Molly Devlin’s Ethereal Portraits

November 29, 2022

Grace Ebert

A painted portrait of a deer comprised of delicate foliage

All images © Molly Devlin, shared with permission

In her exquisitely rendered portraits in acrylic, artist Molly Devlin instills an aura of dreamlike mystery. She shapes the likeness of a deer or snail from layers of translucent florals and foliage: stacked leaves splay outward like the fur of a cat’s face, fronds and wispy tendrils billow from the bulbous head of a jellyfish, and mycelium cloaks a small bird in delicate webbing. Through the fantastical, gossamer compositions, Devlin prods the ephemeral nature of existence and explores various facets of the unknown. “I’ve always been fascinated by the mysteries beyond life and death, the unexplainable offers infinite inspiration to me,” she shares.

Devlin, who is based in Sacramento, is currently preparing for an upcoming group exhibition at Corey Helford Gallery, and she also has shows slated for next year at Revolution Gallery and Arch Enemy Arts. Find prints and original paintings in the artist’s shop, and watch her at work on Instagram.

 

A painted portrait of a cat comprised of delicate foliage

A painted portrait of a jellyfish comprised of delicate foliage

A photo of a framed painted portrait of a bird comprised of mycelium

A photo of a framed painted portrait of a snail comprised of mycelium

A detail of a painted portrait of a deer comprised of delicate foliage

A photo of a framed painted portrait of a jellyfish made of foliage

 

 



Photography

Vital Impacts Launches a Winter Print Sale with Photos from Jane Goodall, David Doubilet, and Beth Moon to Raise Money for Conservation

November 29, 2022

Grace Ebert

A photo of a fox

Konsta Punkka, “Intensity.” All images © the artists, courtesy of Vital Impacts, shared with permission

Within its first year, the woman-led nonprofit Vital Impacts raised $1,500,000 for conservation and humanitarian efforts through print sales from dozens of lauded photographers. The organization, which is led by Ami Vitale and Eileen Mignoni, just announced its latest initiative that features 145 stunning images and composites capturing the stunning breadth of the natural world. Included in this collection are hand-signed portraits from Jane Goodall and works from multiple artists previously featured on Colossal, including the dramatic and intimate glimpses of foxes captured by Konsta Punkka, David Doubilet’s underwater vistas, Beth Moon’s famous documentation of ancient Baobab trees, and Mitch Dobrowner’s sinister storms.

Sixty percent of the proceeds will be donated to Jane Goodall Institute’s Roots and Shoots and Vital Impacts’ own grants and initiatives. Shop the collection on the Vital Impacts site.

 

A composite photo of gorillas in the wild

Jim Naughten, “Gorillas”

A black and white photo of lions

Anup Shah, “Morani and Friend”

A photo of chimpanzees and two people

Vanne Goodall, “Jane and Hugo with the F-Family of Chimpanzees”

A photo of a baby owl

Javier Aznar, “Athene Noctua”

A photo of lighting striking above water occupied by cranes

Randy Olson, “Sandhill Crane Migration”

An underwater photo of a whale tail

Shawn Heinrichs, “Whale Tail”

A photo of a snow covered landscape

Francisco Javier Munuera Gonzalez, “Mount Adi”

 

 



Art

Haphazard Safe Havens Rise into the Sky in Simon Laveuve’s Miniature Post-Apocalyptic Islands

November 29, 2022

Grace Ebert

A photo of a miniature post-apocalyptic structure

Detail of “La Bouée” (2022), 47 x 19 x 19 centimeters. All images © Simon Laveuve, shared with permission

Paris-based artist Simon Laveuve (previously) continues to build out his dystopian universe with rickety structures that tower above land and sea. Heavy with dirt and the occasional graffiti tag, the miniature constructions are eerie, disquieting safe havens in what appears to be a post-apocalyptic landscape. Salvaged objects like tires, wooden panels, and lengths of chain support the shelters, which tend to contain tiny outlooks with seating and remnants of provisions. In his most recent mixed-media sculptures like “Le 122,” Laveuve considers lawlessness and what it means to live in an organized society without rule.

The artist has an upcoming show in New York, and you can follow news about that exhibition on Instagram.

 

Two detail photos of a miniature post-apocalyptic structure

Detail of “La Bouée” (2022), 47 x 19 x 19 centimeters

A detail photo of a miniature post-apocalyptic structure

Detail of “La Bouée” (2022), 47 x 19 x 19 centimeters

Two detail photos of a miniature post-apocalyptic structure

Detail of “Le 122” (2022), 70 x 40 x 25 centimeters

A photo of a miniature post-apocalyptic structure

“Le 122” (2022), 70 x 40 x 25 centimeters

Two photos of a miniature post-apocalyptic structure

“Dans la soucoupe” (2018), 20 x 20 x 55 centimeters

A detail photo of a miniature post-apocalyptic structure

Detail of “Le 122” (2022), 70 x 40 x 25 centimeters

 

 



Design

A Kinetic Glass Greenhouse Blossoms into a Massive Open-Air Terrarium

November 29, 2022

Grace Ebert

An aerial image of an open glass greenhouse

All images by Hufton + Crow, courtesy of Heatherwick Studio, shared with permission

A kinetic design by Heatherwick Studio transforms a sleek glass enclosure on the Woolbeding Gardens property into an elegant flower in full bloom. Situated at the edge of the West Sussex estate, “Glasshouse” protects a melange of sub-tropical flora from southwest China, particularly those found along the Silk Road. A hydraulic mechanism opens the 10 panels of the aluminum-and-steel structure during warmer temperatures, allowing for ventilation within the 141-square-meter terrarium and transforming the architectural form into a blossoming botanical.

Heatherwick Studio is responsible for an eclectic array of designs, including a silo-turned-art-gallery and a honeycomb vessel for pedestrians, and you can follow the latest on Instagram.

 

A photo of a glass greenhouse

An aerial photo of a glass greenhouse

A photo inside a glass greenhouse

A photo looking toward the sky through a glass greenhouse

A photo of an open glass greenhouse

An aerial photo of a glass greenhouse

 

 

A Colossal

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Sailing Ship Kite