Art Design

Landscapes of Glistening Digital Rectangles Formed and Subdivided by Algorithms

January 11, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Dimitris Ladopoulos (previously) creates random geometric patterns based on four-sided-forms by implementing an algorithm in the 3D animation program Houdini. The resulting designs look like intricate circuitboards or miniature architectural models, and include networks of gilded elements that glisten despite their digital composition. To create the works, the algorithm splits a rectangle vertically and then horizontally. “The number of splits is randomly selected from a given max,” he explains. “The outcome is fed to the loop, again and again, depending on the number of user defined iterations. A seed value and slight alterations of the algorithm produce a variety of results.”

The Athens-based motion graphics and visual designer has used a similar algorithm to divide artworks by color, constructing what appear to be three-dimensional color palettes from old paintings. You can see more of the designer’s work on his website and Behance.

    

 

 



Art

Quirky Interventions by Octavi Serra Question the Rules of Public Spaces

January 11, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Octavi Serra uses the structures and symbolism of public spaces to question the systems we live with and find humor in their details. The Barcelona-based artist often engages with signage to subvert its original meaning, like forming a massive arrow pointing left with safety stickers that all individually indicate to exit to the right, or adding opposite directives to a signpost for routes to “hope” and “doom”. Serra also questions strictures of space, like adding “the road is lava” to a painted crosswalk, referencing the universal childhood game, or replacing parallel parking space lines with nonsensical squiggles. You can see more of Serra’s quirky interventions on Instagram. (via Lustik)

 

 



Art

Detailed Portraits of Animals Combine Intricate Layers and Decorative Flourishes

January 10, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

The newest series by Manila-based paper artist Patrick Cabral (previously) features three white animals detailed with elements of black and gold. A pink nose serves as a stylistic outlier for a  whiskered tiger, while the long and narrow trunk of Cabral’s elephant is completed with a dazzling linear adornment in gold. The animal’s design is similar to a previous elephant iteration Cabral created out of paper in 2017. However, the newer piece’s radial patterns on its forehead and symmetrical ears provide a distinct contrast in composition. To support their more permanent display, the artist used MDF to form each intricate layer.

These works, in addition to a quetzal with wide-spread wings, were commissioned by Starbucks for a new Reserve location in Manilla, Philippines. You can learn more about how these sculptures came to fruition on Instagram.

     

 

 



Art

Vintage Glass Forged into Enchanted Leafy Worlds by Amber Cowan

January 10, 2019

Anna Marks

Bridesmaid's Forest

Bridesmaid’s Forest

In the latest collection by Amber Cowan (previously), colorful vintage glass is sculpted into three fairytale stories: Bridesmaid’s Forest, Bridesmaid’s Search for the Desert Rose, and Grotto of the Chocolate Nymph. Cowan transforms discarded glass from the 1900s into sculptural “paintings” that burst with natural forms, and her latest collection of monochrome scenes effortlessly tempts viewers into their enchanted worlds.

Cowan first curates the color of each piece, collecting specific figurines and animals from vintage glass works. She then melts the rest of the glass through a methodical flameworking process to create the scenery that will surround the found figurines. Leaves, flowers, feathers, and tiny glistening pearls are carefully crafted to fill each dense, botanical world.

Bridesmaid’s Forest

The female figurine central to her mint-green Bridesmaid’s Forest  was originally part of a glass ornament called The Bridesmaid, which was pressed from the Ohio-based Fenton Art Glass Factory. Cowan built a fantastical world around the bridesmaid, sculpting a colorful leaf-filled forest which features a whale, snail, and duck nestled within the fragile glass shrubbery. “My story with this piece is that the bridesmaid got bored of the wedding and wandered off to make her own fun,” Cowan explains to Colossal. “It is kind of a fantasy landscape.”

Bridesmaid’s Forest

Bridesmaid’s Search for the Desert Rose is a spiritual adventure where the natural elements featured in the piece were chosen for their symbolism and how they relate to the bridesmaid’s story. “The figurine is standing in front of a pyramidal line pointed towards the sun; next to her is her feline companion and across from her is the totem animal of the giraffe symbolizing the ability to see into the future and obtain things that are normally out of reach,” she explains. At the base of the sculpture are two swans which fill the narrative with themes of intuition, self-actualization, and love. 

Cowan’s chocolate-colored Grotto of the Chocolate Nymph, is exhibited in the permanent collection of The Toledo Museum of Art and was inspired by Jan Brueghel the Elder’s painting A Fantastic Cave with Odysseus and Calypso in addition to the16th century Grotto Grande in the Boboli Gardens in Florence. “Chocolate Nymph” refers to “chocolate glass,” a popular glass color in the early 1900s that is no longer produced.

Cowan is currently constructing new work for a solo show opening at Heller Gallery in New York on May 3, 2019. To view more of her work, visit her website and her Instagram.

Bridesmaid’s Search for the Desert Rose

Bridesmaid’s Search for the Desert Rose

Bridesmaid’s Search for the Desert Rose

Grotto of the Chocolate Nymph

Grotto of the Chocolate Nymph

Grotto of the Chocolate Nymph

 

 



Art

A Mural of Brightly Colored Shapes and Clusters of Spots Gives a Striking Update to a School Courtyard in Sicily

January 10, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

"Ragusa Sun (Courtyard Painting)" (2018), Acrylic paint on asphalt, 45 x 147 feet, created for the Liceo Scientifico E. Fermi in Ragusa, Sicily, commissioned and organized by Festiwall and Liceo Scientifico, all photography by Piero Sabatino 

“Ragusa Sun (Courtyard Painting)” (2018), Acrylic paint on asphalt, 45 x 147 feet, created for the Liceo Scientifico E. Fermi in Ragusa, Sicily, commissioned and organized by Festiwall and Liceo Scientifico, all photography by Piero Sabatino

Atlanta-based artist Alex Brewer, a.k.a. Hense, paints overlapping shapes and patterns on canvases, outdoor murals, and even billboards. His brightly colored abstract work appears around the world, from the US and Germany to Taiwan and Australia. Most recently Brewer created an acrylic paint mural on the asphalt courtyard of the Liceo Scientifico E. Fermi high school in Ragusa, Sicily.

For the piece, titled “Ragusa Sun,” Brewer wanted to add an element of inspiration and curiosity for the students at the school. “We used colors that contrasted starkly with the existing architecture and we were very conscience of the space and scale we worked in,” he tells to Colossal. “The forms, lines, and colors are intended to be purely compositional, but I enjoy the idea of viewers having different interpretations of the work.”

Brewer’s show INTERPLAY is on view through January 26, 2019, at Sandler Hudson Gallery in Atlanta, Georgia. You can follow his indoor and outdoor creations on the artist’s website and Instagram. (via designboom)

 

 



Craft Food

Miniature Embroideries by ipnot Transform Thread into Delicious Designs

January 9, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Japanese embroidery artist ipnot (previously) continues to dazzle us with her creative miniatures formed from thread and embroidery hoops. The works often incorporate props, such as ketchup bottles or chopsticks, to add an interactive layer to the pieces. Textile noodles are staged in slurping position while a perfect pile of ketchup appears to have just been dolloped onto another one of her works. The artist’s realistic designs typically involve food, like her recent sushi stop-motion animation, or a hovering pizza slice that appears to be connected to an embroidery hoop with melted cheese. You can see more of the artist’s embroideries on Instagram.

 

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Sushi Roll🍣 – #embroidery #stopmotion #ipnot#節分#恵方巻#刺繍

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Art Photography

Model Moostapha Saidi Questions the Audience’s Gaze with Highly Stylized Portraits Shot by Justin Dingwall

January 9, 2019

Andrew LaSane

Photographer Justin Dingwall recently collaborated with South African model Moostapha Saidi on a series of images that speak to themes of perspective and of perception. “A Seat at the Table” was informed by Saidi’s experiences living with the skin condition vitiligo, in addition to conversations between the photographer and model. Taken at face value, the images showcase a man with missing skin pigment, but as the South Africa-based photographer explained to Colossal, the ideas and symbolism are more than skin deep.

Brightly colored and stark white sets contrast Moostapha’s dual-toned skin in each of the images. Dingwall uses precious stones and googly eyes as a commentary on the way that Moostapha is objectified by strangers who stare, point, and see him as an other because of the way he looks. “I worked with the old saying ‘a seat at the table’ to represent the idea of an opportunity to be heard, to be seen, to have a voice and an opinion, and in this way to make a difference,” he explains to Colossal. “The images that I have created with Moostapha aim to start conversations about preconceived ideas and perceptions based on appearance, and how what we see affects what we think.”

Dingwall says that during his first collaboration with the aspiring model he learned about his story and about the disease that, at first, was a challenge and later became a source of pride and confidence. “Vitiligo is a topic that I did not know much about and I am always interested to expand my world through my art and learn about something that is not seen as ‘usual,'” Dingwall tells Colossal. “I decided to create a body of work that engages with this topic on a much deeper level, and that raises questions about perspective, as well as how the media and representations subjectively perceive the world and other people.”

Because of his appearance, growing up was difficult for Moostapha, Dingwall says, but things have changed. “Through these challenges he has gained strength and confidence from looking so different. He no longer sees his vitiligo as a hindrance, but as something precious and unique… As in previous bodies of work, I hope in these images to highlight beauty in difference. In these images it is now Moostapha who is staring back at the viewer. Questioning our gaze.”

“A Seat at the Table” has helped Saidi pursue his dream of becoming a model, as he is now signed to one of the top agency’s in South Africa. In 2019 Justin Dingwall plans to create more images in the series, has three new bodies of work planned, and a few upcoming exhibitions in Europe. Follow him on Instagram for future updates and to see more of his photography.