Animation

Over 1,400 Hand-Painted and Drawn Frames Create a Maze of Emotion in a New Music Video for Mitski

March 12, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

For the recent music video for American singer Mitski, designers and animators Saad Moosajee and Danaé Gosset teamed up with creative studio Art Camp to create an animation from 1,480 hand-painted and drawn frames. Pearl follows a single character as she free-falls through a series of scenes, crashing through an ocean to finally land in the same environment where the music video started. 3D renderings merge with traditional mediums such as charcoal, paint, dry pastel, oil pastel, ink, and colored pencils. The result is a swirling and chaotic world that consumes the main character in a wave of adrenaline-pumping emotion. You can see the full video for Pearl below. (via Vimeo Staff Picks)

 

 



Art

Hand-Painted Ceramics of Everyday Objects Inspired by Classical Chinese Paintings

March 11, 2019

Anna Marks

Photo by Wan Liya

Photo by Wan Liya

Chinese artist Wan Liya paints natural sceneries inspired by traditional Chinese paintings onto ceramics of contemporary household items. Soda bottles and soap dispensers become highly decorative objects, blurring the line between traditional and contemporary craft.

Each piece has its own detailed illustration—some feature birds perching upon blossomed trees, while others depict rugged mountainous forms. However, when the objects are arranged together, they compose a larger picture. The images are inspired by Wang Ximeng’s 12th-century painting One Thousand Li of Rivers and Mountains, a large piece depicting mountains and lakes meticulously painted on Chinese silk.

“The idea of this installation work is based on one of the top ten [most classic] paintings in Chinese art history,” says Wan. “The Emperor Song Hui Zong liked [Wang Ximeng] very much and called him into the imperial palace and taught him personally when he was 18 years old. He died when he was 21 years old. Now, this is the only painting by him left.”

Influenced by Wang Ximeng’s skill and craft, Wan Liya reinvents his traditional Chinese style by placing the imagery onto contemporary objects, elevating the meaning and beauty of ordinary, everyday items. To view more of his work visit the China Design Centre’s online gallery and visit Wan’s website.

China Design Centre, photo by Phoebe Guo

China Design Centre, photo by Phoebe Guo

China Design Centre, photo by Phoebe Guo

China Design Centre, photo by Phoebe Guo

Photo by Wan Liya

Photo by Wan Liya

China Design Centre, photo by Phoebe Guo

China Design Centre, photo by Phoebe Guo

Photo by Wan Liya

Photo by Wan Liya

 

 



Art

Frozen Victorian Garments Arranged into a Larger than Life Bouquet by Nicole Dextras

March 11, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Bouquet by Nicole Dextras is a composition of 15 frozen garments reminiscent of a floral arrangement, however the beauty is intended to be both enchanting and foreboding. The alluring collection of Victorian dresses was created to appear more like Venus flytraps rather than to reference romance, and speaks to mythical man-eating trees described in science fiction texts like J. W. Buel’s 1887 text Sea and Land. 

“Today we understand the use of symmetry and patterning in nature as a survival skill,” Dextras tells Colossal. “Birds and flowers in particular seem to go for the ‘big display’ to attract a mate and humans in our vanity, are susceptible to the same spell of wonder. This bouquet however was made with ice; it made its big splash in the wintery forest and within a few days it was gone.”

The collection of frozen garments was created over the course of several days during Dextras’s art residency at Banff Centre in Alberta, Canada. Dextras would spray the forms with water each night when temperatures were at their lowest to build up the right composition of icicles, and bond the garments into one large installation. Like many of her frozen installations, the work leaves no trace and is instead preserved as a subsequent photo series. You can find more of her work on her website, Facebook, and Instagram. (via Hi Fructose)

 

 



Design Documentary

Rubber Powered Model Airplanes Take Flight in New ‘Float’ Documentary Trailer

March 10, 2019

Andrew LaSane

The full trailer for the documentary Float (previously) introduces the world to a niche indoor sport that involves building and flying self-propelled model airplanes. Directed and edited by Phil Kibbe, the film follows two American pilots, Brett Sanborn and Yuan Kang Lee, as they gear up for the sport’s main event: the F1D World Championships in Romania.

The new trailer showcases the elegant movement of the model planes, and the delicate technique that the pilots use to tightly twist the rubber bands that power them. The movement of the planes appears to be slowed down, but the movement of the pilots and spectators confirms that the footage has not been altered for effect. The world premiere of Float will take place on April 5 at the 43rd Cleveland International Film Festival, in Cleveland, Ohio, with additional screenings throughout the weekend.

 

 



Design

A Cascading Metal Rainbow Fills a Bookstore in Suzhou, China with Layers of Transparent Hues

March 9, 2019

Andrew LaSane

All images: Yijie Hu

As a part of a larger project inside of a unique bookstore in Suzhou, China, architectural designers WUtopia Lab framed a reading room with a colorful structure referred to as the “Xanadu of Rainbows.” Made of one-centimenter thick aluminum sheets that have been perforated and cut into swooping shapes, the metal rainbow is created in a gradient that shifts through almost every shade in the ROYGBIV spectrum.

The word Xanadu is used to describe an idyllic space or place, which is what the architects sought to create with the vibrant, flowing design. The curved panels are installed along the ceiling and down the walls of the bookstore’s reading room and sections of the structure drip down like chromatic stalactites. In addition to creating an eye-catching aesthetic, the panels also functionally divide the open space into sections. To see more of WUtopia Lab’s interior and exterior work, check them out on Instagram. (via ArchDaily)

 

 



Art

Interactive Sculptures Mirror Visitors’ Movements in Shimmering Fabrics and Cracked Clay

March 8, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Israeli-American artist Daniel Rozin (previously) creates performative objects that interact with the audience through mirroring. In his recent piece Cracked Mud (2019), a mound of clay pieces undulate and upturn in response to visitors’ movements below a low-hanging orb. The suspended light mimics the sun, hovering over the manipulated and cracked earth below. Another piece, Fabric Mirror (2019), uses a digital camera and 400 motors to capture the movements of those who walk past, imitating their gestures in twisting gold and red fabric. Both works allude to how the sun interacts with our bodies and the earth, the former representing a barren future, while the later explores our reflection bathed in shimmering gold. Each are included in Rozin’s solo exhibition Sol at bitforms gallery in New York through March 17, 2019. You can see more of his interactive sculptures and installations on his website. (via Hyperallergic)

 

 



Art

Chairs, Stools, and Coat Racks Carved into Raw Pieces of Wood by Alicja Kwade

March 8, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

"Achairisatreeisachair" (2017), image by Roman März

“Achairisatreeisachair” (2017), image by Roman März

Polish artist Alicja Kwade carves into tree trunks to create 3/4-formed stools and chairs that balance with the support of the unfinished segments of wood. The carved furniture would be simple in its construction if taken out of context, but in conjunction with the tree trunks the pieces exist in a liminal space between design object and source material. Kwade’s carved furniture is currently exhibited with Berlin-based König Galerie at the The Armory Show in New York through March 10, 2019. You can see more of her work, like these sculptural installations that create illusions with tree trunks and mirrors, on her website and Instagram.

Detail of "Achairisatreeisachair" (2017), image by Roman März

Detail of “Achairisatreeisachair” (2017), image by Roman März

"Ein Barhocker ist ein Barhocker ist ein Barhocker" (2017), photo by Roman März

“Ein Barhocker ist ein Barhocker ist ein Barhocker” (2017), photo by Roman März

"Astoolisastoolisastool" (2017), photo by Roman März

“Astoolisastoolisastool” (2017), photo by Roman März

"Astoolisastoolisastool" (2017), photo by Roman März

“Astoolisastoolisastool” (2017), photo by Roman März

Images via @koeniggalerie

Images via @koeniggalerie

"Ein Barhocker ist ein Barhocker ist ein Barhocker" (2017), photo by Roman März

“Ein Barhocker ist ein Barhocker ist ein Barhocker” (2017), photo by Roman März

Current installation of Alicja Kwade's work at König Galerie's booth at the Armory Show in New York

Current installation of Alicja Kwade’s work at König Galerie’s booth at the Armory Show in New York