Art

Constellations of Found Electronics Shape Faces on Vintage Rackets by Artist Leonardo Ulian

June 14, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Leonardo Ulian, shared with permission

London-based artist Leonardo Ulian (previously) merges two disparate elements in his sprawling assemblages: he speckles analog equipment with an array of electronic pieces found in digital devices. Created while in quarantine, Ulian’s Contrived Object series is comprised of vintage tennis rackets displaying intricate constellations of metal parts, microchips, and other found objects that form an abstract face.

The egg shape of the “head” of these vintage rackets reminded me of something yet familiar but at the moment lost. The result is a composition that resembles vaguely a human face made from a recycled object from the past, the racket, clashing with the rest of the elements, electronic parts, and the found objects. Then, an anomaly called “pareidolia,” the mechanism that leads our brain to bring things and objects of all kinds back to known and sensible forms does the rest. Will these be the faces of the future?

To view more of Ulian’s precisely arranged projects, follow him on Instagram.

 

 

 



Art

30 Hand-Cranked Machines Comprise Amusing Series of Miniatures by Artist Federico Tobon

June 12, 2020

Grace Ebert

Similar to Lalese Stamps’s personal challenge to create 100 ceramic mug handles, a Los Angeles-based artist has crafted an amusing series of hand-cranked automatons in just 30 days. Federico Tobon, of wolfCat Workshop, used popsicle sticks, metal clips, paper, and scrap material for One Month of Small Machines, a four-week-long project that generated different, moveable figures and animals each day. “The A-HA moment from these projects was when I discovered that using paper gives these machines a very organic feel,” he said. “Some of them would look very stiff and mechanical otherwise.”

Since November 2017 when Tobon created these miniature apparatuses, he’s taken on more month-long challenges, which he often shares on Instagram. Check out the full collection on his site or by watching the video below. (via Laughing Squid)

 

 

 



Food Photography

A Model Morphs into a Rotund Tomato, Peeled Banana, and a Hoagie in a Bizarre Photographic Series

June 12, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Annie Collinge, with styling and art direction by Rottingdean Bazaar, shared with permission

A new photo series, titled Table For One, takes the proverbial saying that “you are what you eat” literally as it transforms model Tin Gao by sandwiching her between layers of cheese, lunchmeat, shredded lettuce, and sliced tomato in a bulging hoagie. Shot by photographer Annie Collinge, the bizarre series sees Gao morph from one food group to the next, whether as a stout tomato fashioned from a red jacket that covers the model from chin to ankle or stuffed into a peeled banana that mimics a sleeping bag.

With styling and art direction by James Theseus Buck and Luke Brooks of Rottingdean Bazaar, the humorous photographs were shot for Luncheon Magazine. Watch the video of the resting chicken below to see a somewhat unsettling part of the project, and follow Collinge and Rottingdean Bazaar’s future collaborations on Instagram. (via Inag)

 

 

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Art Photography

Hundreds of Photos of the New York Sky Pinned to a Massive, Spherical Sculpture by Sarah Sze

June 11, 2020

Grace Ebert

” Shorter than the Day” (2020), powder-coated aluminum and steel, 48 x 30 x 30 feet. All images © Sarah Sze by Nicholas Knight

Artist Sarah Sze explores the myriad conceptions of time and space through a tremendous, new spherical sculpture. Titled “Shorter than the Day” —a reference to Emily Dickinson’s poem “Because I could not stop for Death,” which considers the comfort found in life’s finality—Sze’s piece weighs five tons and was unveiled Thursday at LaGuardia Airport. It is suspended above an atrium in Terminal B.

The New York-based artist captures the magnitude of the upper atmosphere as it changes from bright blue morning to a vibrant sunset to the rich hues of the night through nearly 1,000 photographs of the sky. Each printed image is fastened to the aluminum and steel with alligator clips and is revealed as viewers move around the massive work, just like the earth circles the sun to mark a day. The piece was fabricated in collaboration with Amuneal.

Along with three other projects from artists Jeppe Hein, Laura Owens, Sabine Hornig, “Shorter than the Day” was commissioned by LaGuardia Gateway Partners and Public Art Fund. To find out more about Sze, whose work involves countless individual objects positioned in precise arrangements, watch her TED Talk and visit her site. (via ArtNet)

 

 

 



Photography

Dive Into a Never-Ending Sequence of Jumps and Tucks in an Olympic-Games Compilation

June 11, 2020

Grace Ebert

Although devotees of the Olympic games will have to wait until 2021 for the next round of competitions, Donato Sansone channels the same excitement, energy, and displays of strength into an extravagant new mashup. A second iteration of his previous video by the same name, Sansone’s latest motion sequence is comprised of short clips of athletes completing tucks, dives, and pikes. Each bit of footage seamlessly blends into the next, making the competitors appear to be joined in a single, nearly minute-long jump.

For more of Sansone’s Rube Goldberg-esque sequences, head to Tumblr and Vimeo.

 

 

 



Photography

Graceful Photographs of Solitary Figures by Oye Diran Explore Beauty and Empowerment

June 11, 2020

Grace Ebert

“Dakota.” All images © Oye Diran, shared with permission

Oye Diran describes his distinctly elegant photographs as “conceptual with a degree of minimalism and fantasy.” The New York City-based photographer captures refined images of women dressed in pastel gowns of billowing tulle and surrounded by wide swathes of blush fabric—like in “Maktub,” an arresting photograph (shown below) that recently won a first-place LensCulture Exposure Award.

Whether a profile or wider, scenic shot, Diran’s work frames solitary subjects who often are closing their eyes or looking away from the camera. The photographs highlight the grace of the female body without veering into the sensual. “I try to convey the many truths and beauty of people of color, empowerment, and life ideologies in my images,” he tells Colossal.

Diran begins each stylized photograph, which he often shares on Instagram, with a mood board of notes and inspiration from nature, art, and movies. Choices about the color palette, models, poses, props, and scenery reflect that spirit. “I can come up with a message I’m trying to channel to my audience and then build the imagery that conveys that message. Inversely, I can create imagery without any intended message, purely from a mood or expressive creativity where interpretation is left to the audience,” he says.

 

“Maktub”

“Blue Thoughts”

“Lucid”

“Verity”