Art History

Paris Musées Releases 100,000 Images of Artworks for Unrestricted Public Use

January 10, 2020

Grace Ebert

Setting Sun on the Seine at Lavacourt” by Claude Monet (1880), oil on canvas, part of the collection at Petit Palais, Paris

This week the Paris Musées added 100,000 digital copies of its artworks to the public domain, making them free and unrestricted for the public to download and use. From Claude Monet’s “Setting Sun on the Seine at Lavacourt” to Paul Cézanne’s “Portrait of Ambroise Vollard,” the collection contains work from artists, such as Gustave Courbet, Victor Hugo, and Rembrandt, that are housed at 14 museums in Paris like the Musée d’Art Moderne, Petit Palais, and even the catacombs.

Each file contains the high-resolution image, a description about the piece, and the location of the original work, in addition to an exhibition history and citation tips. Most of the images available right now capture 2D works, although there are lower resolution files available of pieces that are not yet in the public domain, providing visitors to the site a chance to view more of the museums’ collections. The site also offers virtual exhibitions, with a project centered on the collections at Maison de Victor Hugo currently on view. (via Hyperallergic)

Portrait of Juliette Courbet” by Gustave Courbet (1844), oil on canvas, part of the collection at Petit Palais

Portrait of Ambroise Vollard” by Paul Cézanne (1899), oil on canvas, part of the collection at Petit Palais, Paris

Julia Jackson from the front ‘Stella’” by Julia Margaret Cameron (1867), photograph printed on albumen paper, part of the collection at Maison de Victor Hugo

Presentation in the Temple” by Jacques Daret (1434-1435), oil on wood, part of the collection at Petit Palais, Paris

Bronze medal of Jean-Jacques Rousseau (19th century), part of the collection at Musée Carnavalet

Portrait of Mr. Victor Hugo” by Léon Bonnat (1879), oil on canvas, part of the collection at Maison de Victor Hugo

Thirty-seven portraits of Voltaire” by Dominique Vivant-Denon (1775), print, part of the collection at Musée Carnavalet

 

 

 



Design

Small Shapes Slot Together to Construct Vessels That Can Be Reconfigured

January 10, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Kenji Abe

To combat single-use plastic waste, Tokyo-based designer Kenji Abe has conceived of a packaging material that can be arranged in various shapes and refashioned multiple times. The six-tipped CY-BO pieces can be woven together to create pouches, placemats, and other vessels that then can be deconstructed and reused. The project even reached the final rounds of the 2018 Kokuyo Design Awards.

Because of the shape’s flexibility, Abe says other materials like leather can be used in its place to create similar products. “It is a new packaging material that can be used depending on one’s ideas,” Abe told Plain Magazine. “Because in order to reduce discarded plastic, it’s necessary to make packing materials that can be reused as many times as possible.” You can follow more of Abe’s inventive designs on Instagram.

 

 



Art Colossal

Fundraiser: Buy This Artwork and Support the Bushfire Crisis in Australia

January 9, 2020

Christopher Jobson

Earlier this week we were sent this heartbreaking new animation from Oh Yeah Wow (previously) that was created in direct response to the horrific Bushfire Crisis currently unfolding across Australia. Titled “Tomorrow’s on Fire,” the short addresses the collective hopelessness felt in the face of political inaction, and the loss of 28 lives, thousands of homes, and potentially hundreds of millions of animals, in a fire season greatly exacerbated by the effects of global warming.

Oh Yeah Wow’s animation inspired us to put together a quick fundraiser. We reached out to artists across the globe and asked if anyone might be willing to donate a print, painting, or object, with a percentage of sales going toward humanitarian, wildlife, and firefighter support in Australia. More than 50 artists answered the call offering their work, so many that we were unable to include everyone here. All the pieces below are available now, with proceeds going toward various relief organizations. Click through to each work to see the terms and beneficiary.

Thank you to everyone for contributing. It means the world. If you’re unable to afford a purchase right now, please consider donating directly to the Wildlife Victoria. Without further adieu, PLEASE buy this art.

 

 

 

Anatomical and Botanical Filigree Sculptures by Joshua Harker (use code COLOSSAL at checkout, 40% donation to WIRES)

 

Wolf & Bison Prints by Erik Fremstad (100% of proceeds to WIRES)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AND THERE’S MORE…

See also work by Cultur, Elisa Dore, 3 Fish Studios, Stephanie Shank, Marcy Lamberson, LittleGoldFoxDesigns, Jenny Belin, Dan Alvarado, Natalie Wernimont, Hannah Rothstein, Rayna Lo, Sally Bartos, and Cheri Smith.

 

 



NYCB Art Series Presents Lauren Redniss

January 9, 2020

Colossal

Lauren Redniss, an artist and author of several works of visual non-fiction, has been invited by New York City Ballet to create a signature installation for their eighth annual Art Series.

She will create a 360-degree panorama of portraits depicting more than 100 people who work at New York City Ballet, celebrating the behind-the-scenes efforts that are the lifeblood of the theater.

Redniss wants visitors to be surrounded by faces, color, and light. She says, “By looking into the eyes of each person and reading their words, I hope visitors’ experience of coming to the theater will gain a new dimension.”

The installations will be on view at three special New York City Ballet Art Series performances on February 1 eve, 7, and 27 where all tickets are priced at $35. Performances are on sale now at nycballet.com/artseries.

 

 



Design

Playful Chairs Designed by Chris Wolston Impersonate the Humans Who Sit on Them

January 9, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Chris Wolston, by David Sierra

Brooklyn-based designer Chris Wolston wonders why traditional furniture created for people to lounge and rest on lacks human-like qualities. “Wouldn’t it be nice to actually embrace these similarities?” asks a statement describing his recent Nalgona Chair line, which attempts to rectify the problems he sees with conventional seating models. Wolston’s imitative chairs have distinct appendages displayed in a way that mimics a person with their hands in the air or resting gently on their knees.

The playful seats are made entirely of wicker harvested in the Colombian Amazon. “The human form riffs on the iconic shape of the plastic Remax Chair, ubiquitous through Colombia, and the playful humanoid quality found in pre-Columbian ceramics,” reads the product’s description. Head over to The Future Perfect to add one these unconventional furnishings to your collection, and follow Wolston on Instagram for his latest projects.

 

 



Art

Giant Ribbons of Wood Form Twisting Root Structures in Expansive Installation

January 8, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Wade Kavanaugh and Stephen B. Nugyen, shared with permission

For their recent installation “Study in Pattern,” artists Wade Kavanaugh and Stephen B. Nguyen (previously) expanded on the idea of constructing an enormous tree comprised of long wood strips in studio. The result is an arboreal project that occupies almost an entire room with outstretched portions extending up to the ceiling and toward each corner of the space. Visitors to the exhibition were able to peer up through the spiraling trunk of the tree and walk beneath the wide-reaching roots.

The experimental project was developed for the Islamic Arts Festival in Sharjah, a United Arab Emirates city that is part of the Dubai-Sharjah-Ajman metropolitan area. To engage the traditions of Islamic art, Kavanaugh and Nguyen told Colossal they incorporated Arabesque elements into “Study in Pattern.”

This work draws from the architectural cues of the site: the repetition of arches, overlapping linear patterns, and the viewer’s attention is focused as they pass through the interior of a dome, but the finished work ultimately took on the feel a gesture drawing, veering away from regularity of pattern and toward entropic wildness.

The artists say they are testing this installation as a small version before producing the complete project in Seattle. More about the duo’s massive nature-based works can be found on their site.

 

 



Design Science

Tiny Organisms Escape Life Under a Microscope in Oversized Puppets by Judith Hope

January 8, 2020

Grace Ebert

A bacteriophage puppet. All images © Judith Hope

The familiar faces of friendly puppets like Kermit and Elmo are missing from Judith Hope’s enlarged microbe creations that magnify the world’s tiniest organisms. A brown bacteriophage, commonly known as a virus, features six moveable legs powered by a hand-operated device, while a pink tardigrade stands upright and sways side-to-side. Sometimes referred to as a “water bear,” the tardigrade imitates a resilient animal who can survive in extreme conditions and is usually only .02 inches long when fully grown. The models originally were created for the Tatwood Puppets production of Microbodyssey, a visual experience utilizing puppetry and shadow theater to explore life under the microscope. You can watch a trailer for the microbe-based show on Vimeo, and see more of Hope’s handheld crafts on Instagram.

Tardigrade and bacteriophage puppets

A bacteria puppet with removable DNA

Common cold puppet

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Judith Hope (@judithhopepuppetmaker) on

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Judith Hope (@judithhopepuppetmaker) on