Art

Otherworldly Tropical Fruits and Plants From the Imagination of Ceramicist William Kidd

November 5, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Ceramicist William Kidd has been working for over 25 years using a combination of wheel throwing and hand building to form his imaginative organic specimens. The Florida-based artist shares in a statement on his website that he draws inspiration from the natural world: “my work is not an imitation of any real living thing, but rather life forms that might exist in some other worldly place.” Kidd uses low-fire red earthenware finished with oxide stains, underglazes, and crawl glaze to form sculptural seeds, fruits, and flowers. Spikes and bulges protrude from beneath the surfaces of the brightly colored and richly textured pieces, with stalks and flowers bursting through, indicating a forthcoming metamorphosis. Kidd frequently shows his work at art festivals and fairs, especially in Florida. You can keep up with his show itinerary on his website and Instagram.

 

 



Animation

Hand-Drawn Gifs Created from Graphite and Marker by Benjamin Zimmermann

November 5, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Benjamin Zimmermann of KonkreteGifs uses pencils and Stabilo markers to create hand-drawn geometric animations. Cubes, hexagons, and other angular shapes are presented as three-dimensional explorations on plain white or gridded paper. The objects move, shift, and tumble across the space either in graphite grayscale or technicolor shades.

“I really love GIFs because they have to be short, but at the same time infinite loops,” the German artist explained to Colossal. “… I really like the unsteady character of my hand-drawn GIFs, they have something human that my 3D animations were missing. There are always little errors in my work.”

In 2013 Zimmermann began a Daily Cube project on Tumblr where he posted drawings, images or GIFs related to cubes each day. After 365 days Zimmermann ceased regular posting, however he still updates the site with some of his favorite cubed GIFs. His new project KonkreteGifs was inspired by Concrete art, a movement towards geometric abstraction in the 1930s and 40s. You can see his new work on Tumblr and follow him on Twitter. (via Cross Connect)

 

 

 



Art

Mountain Ranges and Beehive Structures Inspire Amy Genser’s Intricate Rolled Paper Sculptures

November 2, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

“Lunar Spin” (2016), Paper, copper, brass, aluminum and acrylic on canvas, 78 inch diameter, all images via Amy Genser

Connecticut-based Amy Genser (previously) uses rolled paper and acrylic paint to create topographic explorations of rocky and oceanic landscapes. Her sculptures reference natural forms and creatures such as barnacles, the tubular formation of beehives, and the way water travels and flows through Earth’s oceans. The works are also inspired by macro and micro depictions of nature, like cellular processes or a satellite images of a mountainous terrain.

Recently Genser has begun making multi-part pieces that allow her to work more sculpturally. She will present her rolled paper landscapes in the upcoming group exhibition Common Ground opening at Amy Simon Fine Art in Westport, Connecticut on November 3, 2018 and running through December 31, 2018. You can see more of her work on her website, Facebook, and Instagram.

“Black and White Squares” (2018), Paper and acrylic on masonite, 42 x 42 x 3 inches

"Black and White Squares" (2018), Paper and acrylic on masonite, 42 x 42 x 3 inches, all images via Amy Genser

“Black and White Squares”,  detail (2018), Paper and acrylic on masonite, 42 x 42 x 3 inches

"Collecting Pebbles" (2017), Paper and acrylic on canvas, 20 x 30 x 4 inches

“Collecting Pebbles” (2017), Paper and acrylic on canvas, 20 x 30 x 4 inches

"Black and White Squares" (2018), Paper and acrylic on masonite, 42 x 42 x 3 inches

“Black and White Squares” (2018), Paper and acrylic on masonite, 42 x 42 x 3 inches

"Aquatic Interstellar Dream" (2018), Paper, acrylic, copper on canvas

“Aquatic Interstellar Dream” (2018), Paper, acrylic, copper on canvas

"Black and White Squares" (2018), Paper and acrylic on masonite, 42 x 42 x 3 inches, all images via Amy Genser

“Black and White Squares” (2018), Paper and acrylic on masonite, 42 x 42 x 3 inches, all images via Amy Genser

"The Not So Itsy Bitsy Spider" (2017), Paper and acrylic on canvas, 65" x 35”

“The Not So Itsy Bitsy Spider” (2017), Paper and acrylic on canvas, 65″ x 35”

 

 



Art

Larger-Than-Life Animals Terrorize Suburban Towns in Paintings by John Brosio

November 2, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"State of the Union 2" (2014), Oil on canvas, 40.25 x 68 inches

“State of the Union 2” (2014), Oil on canvas, 40.25 x 68 inches

The paintings of John Brosio feel incredibly cinematic, as if each is a still from a contemporary horror film paused at a striking moment of tension. Brosio paints enlarged birds, crabs, and Big Gulp containers poised against the American suburban sprawl. The animals and objects hover over fast food chains and car repair shops, looking as if they might strike what lies below at any moment, or simply continue their crusade in an alternate direction. A humor creeps into the paintings when we remember the actual issues our contemporary society and climate face—if presented with the option would we rather choose invasion by iguana?

“The success of a painting in the end has so little to do with subject matter but compels us rather with how well it codifies the way in which things relate to one another in this universe,” he explains in his bio. “I think of painting as the pursuit of realizing some degree of surrender to these sensibilities through an orchestration of select relationships.”

His works have been considered “anxious realism” and seem to point to an particularly poignant American unease. You can see more of Brosio’s tension-filled and dangerous landscapes on his website and Instagram. (via Faithwaites)

"Quixote 2000" (2018), Oil on canvas, 24 x 39 inches

“Quixote 2000” (2018), Oil on canvas, 24 x 39 inches

"Edge of Town 16" (2018), Oil on canvas, 30 x 30 inches

“Edge of Town 16” (2018), Oil on canvas, 30 x 30 inches

"Edge of Town 13" (2015), Oil on canvas, 39 x 62 inches

“Edge of Town 13” (2015), Oil on canvas, 39 x 62 inches

"Progress" (2015), Oil on canvas, 36 x 36 inches

“Progress” (2015), Oil on canvas, 36 x 36 inches

"State of the Union" (2011), Oil on canvas, 41 x 66 inches

“State of the Union” (2011), Oil on canvas, 41 x 66 inches

"Whole Foods" (2011), Oil on canvas, 24 x 46 inches

“Whole Foods” (2011), Oil on canvas, 24 x 46 inches

"Bar" (2018), Oil on canvas, 24 x 30 inches

“Bar” (2018), Oil on canvas, 24 x 30 inches

 

 



Art Design

A Kinetic Sculpture Built from over 600 Parts Gracefully Imitates a Swimming Sea Turtle

November 2, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Carapace is a kinetic sculpture designed by Derek Hugger (previously) that mimics the motion of a sea turtle gliding through the ocean. The wooden work is composed of over six hundred parts which allow the creature to elegantly tilt its fins, move its body up and down, and even crane its head as if rising above the water for air. A single crank controls the complex structure of gears and mechanisms which were designed to flow as organically as possible.

A non-trivial amount of time was spent watching and studying videos of turtles swimming,” explains Hugger. “Getting the motions of Carapace to closely resemble the motions of real turtles was a true challenge. Countless hours were spent refining the sculpture’s motion to be as lifelike as possible, even before any mechanisms were developed to drive those motions.”

Hugger has also developed a hummingbird in addition to several abstract wood sculptures. You can see these works in action on his website and Youtube.

 

 



Art Illustration

Meditative Geometric Shapes Doodled on Old Ledgers by Albert Chamillard

November 1, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Albert Chamillard’s monochromatic pen drawings have drawn acclaim for their ability to calm the minds of viewers. It’s interesting to learn, then, that Chamillard listens to punk and metal while crafting his art, which he shared in an interview with Faithwaites. Though each monochromatic pen-wrought work is undeniably flat, the artist’s careful use of cross-hatching creates a sense of volume by contrasting more- and less-saturated areas. Chamillard uses found and deadstock paper, especially vintage ledgers, and engages the papers’ subtle blue and red writing rules to frame subtle zig-zag patterns within each imagined plane, which further enlivens his seemingly simple drawings.

When he’s not working on his personal projects after hours, Chamillard runs a drawing and book making studio in Tucson, Arizona. He is represented by Eric Firestone Gallery in New York and Etherton Gallery in Tuscon. You can see more from the artist on Instagam.

 

 



Design

A Comprehensive and Colorful Map of London Outlines the City’s Great Buildings and Icons

November 1, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Designer Rafael Esquer of Alfalfa New York (previously) has added a new city print to his collection, this time focusing on the iconic buildings, neighborhoods, and residents of London. The colorful poster highlights the city’s classic landmarks such as Big Ben, the London Eye and the Buckingham Palace, and includes the many bridges that cross over the River Thames. Esquer’s London poster is available for purchase in his online store. The designer is also participating in Colossal’s upcoming exhibition Chain Reaction: Posters About Bikes at the Chicago Design Museum and in the Colossal Shop starting November 16, 2018.

 

 

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