Photography

Aerial Photographs Explore the Unique Geometric Patterns of Coastal Barcelona

March 7, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Márton Mogyorósy explores the coastal city of Barcelona from above, creating geometric images of the Spanish city’s buildings, shore, and sea. Mogyorósy browses the city via Google Earth to get an idea of the natural and manmade shapes he would like to capture, and then finds these areas with the assistance of a drone. The Hungarian photographer photographs lesser known areas of Barcelona, finding structures and buildings that are attractively shaped from the sky, rather than famous tourist attractions from the ground. His second series of drone images of his hometown of Budapest will be published soon. You can keep updated on his aerial photography on Behance and Instagram. (via My Modern Met)

 

 



Art

WATERLICHT: An Immersive Light Installation Conveys the Power and Poetry of Water

March 7, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Dutch artist and designer Daan Roosegaarde created WATERLICHT to raise awareness about rising water levels and the need to continue to innovate and adapt to our changing environment. The ethereal projection uses a combination of LED and lenses, which forms a constantly shifting layer of billowing blue light above the heads of viewers. Since its inception in 2016 as a site-specific artwork for Amsterdam’s Dutch District Water Board, the immersive installation has been shown across the world in London, Toronto, Paris, Rotterdam, Dubai, and at the United Nations headquarters in New York City.

In a statement on the artist’s website, WATERLICHT is described as a “dream landscape about the power and poetry of water… WATERLICHT creates a collective experience to share the importance of water innovation.” Roosegaarde seeks to encourage positive thinking towards adaptations like building floating cities and generating power from water, while also offering a visceral reminder of the power of water and how it can reclaim land.

Roosegaarde’s body of work focuses on the complex relationship between people and our natural surroundings, including smog, space waste, and rainbows. He was recently named a visiting professor at Monterrey University in Monterrey, Mexico for 2019. You can discover more of Roosegaarde’s projects on his website, and watch an interview with the artist at the site of WATERLICHT’s Toronto installation in the video below. (thnx Marlies!)

 

 



Animation Illustration

Paper Illustrations and GIFs Explore the Body and Mind in New Work by Eiko Ojala

March 6, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

New York Times Sunday Review cover, animation for "Life After a hear Attack at Age 38"

New York Times Sunday Review cover, animation for “Life After a hear Attack at Age 38”

New Zealand and Estonia-based illustrator Eiko Ojala (previously) creates cut paper illustrations that present shadow and depth through creative layering of colorful pieces of paper. Recently, his editorial illustrations have been focused on the mind and body, like a cut paper GIF he created for a story on heart attacks in the New York Times. Others, like two Washington Post illustrations, attempt to uncover the thoughts and feelings sequestered in children’s minds by layering images inside the shape of a boy’s profile. You can see more of Ojala’s designs on his Instagram and Behance.

Washington Post cover illustration for "Kids Special."

Washington Post cover illustration for “Kids Special.”

New York Times Sunday Review illustration for "I Did a Terrible Thing. I Needed to Apologize".

New York Times Sunday Review illustration for “I Did a Terrible Thing. I Needed to Apologize.”

New York Times Sunday Review cover, animation and spot illustration for "Life After a hear Attack at Age 38"

New York Times Sunday Review cover, animation and spot illustration for “Life After a hear Attack at Age 38”

 

New Yorker illustrations for "Literary Hoaxes and the Ethics of Authorship."

New Yorker illustrations for “Literary Hoaxes and the Ethics of Authorship.”

Washington Post cover illustration for "Kids Special."

Washington Post cover illustration for “Kids Special.”

New York Times Sunday Review cover, animation and spot illustration for "Life After a hear Attack at Age 38"

New York Times Sunday Review cover, animation and spot illustration for “Life After a hear Attack at Age 38”

 

 



Art Design

Antique Ceramic Dinnerware Punctured into Pieces of Wearable Art by Gésine Hackenberg

March 6, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Amsterdam-based jewelry designer Gésine Hackenberg is classically trained as a goldsmith, yet works with objects that are extracted from the everyday. After becoming bored with the traditional ideas of jewelry in her original field, she began to twist the function of common pieces like ceramic dinnerware to create unique designs. For her line of ceramic jewelry, Hackenberg first finds vintage plates and bowls from secondhand shops, which she then punctures to create small circular “pearls.” These are either strung together to create an ornate necklace, or set in silver for a pair of earrings or brooch. Hackenberg studied jewelry design at the Fachhochschule für Gestaltung Pforzheim in Germany and is currently a visiting professor at the MAD School of Arts in Hasselt, Belgium. You can see more of her collections, like this set of copper fruit jewelry, on her website.

 

 



Design

The Highest City in the World Celebrates Its Indigenous Culture with Freddy Mamani’s Neo-Andean Architecture

March 6, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

The city of El Alto isn’t just distinguished by its impressive altitude of over 13,000 feet above sea level or its self-governing status. This Bolivian municipality also sets itself apart with the distinctive architecture of Freddy Mamani Silvestre. The architect, who goes by Freddy Mamani professionally, got his start as a bricklayer and studied civil engineering in college. He completed his first building in this style in 2005 and has since created dozens more designs that incorporate circular windows, sharply angled rooflines and vibrant pink, green, and orange facades.

The massive buildings seem to tower above their architectural neighbors, but they aren’t private mansions. Many of Mamani’s constructions are multi-use structures, filled with ground-floor rental stalls for vendors, a second floor party venue, and apartments on top. His buildings are nicknamed cholets, a portmaneau of chalet (a Swiss mountain house) and cholo (derogatory slang for indigenous person).

Though many westerners draw comparisons to Las Vegas, Mamani clarifies that the shapes, colors, and patterns he uses are drawn from Bolivia’s pre-Columbian history. In particular, the aguayo, a bright woven cloth of the Aymara, an indigenous group that Mamani is a part of, inspires the architect’s designs. Mamani shared in an interview with The Guardian, “My designs are a modern expression of our culture,” he adds. “Since Evo Morales [the country’s first indigenous president] became president, things have changed a lot. We feel proud of being Aymaran.”

Last fall, Mamani built a ballroom in Paris as the opening work in the Cartier Foundation‘s exhibition on Latin American art and architecture. You can get to know the architect in the Great Big Story video below. Photographer Peter Granser also published a book in 2016 about Mamani’s builds, which is available on the Edition Taube website. (via Quartz)

 

 



Art

Lily Pads and Reeds Surround a Sleeping Child in a New Monochrome Installation by Hans Op de Beeck

March 5, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Detail of “My bed a raft, the room the sea, and then I laughed some gloom in me” (2019), Polyester, polyurethane, steel, polyamide, epoxy, wood, coating

Belgian artist Hans Op de Beeck (previously) creates dream-like installations that exist between what is real and imagined. The figural works represent realistic worlds that have been shifted slightly with their gray, monochrome appearance. In his new work My bed a raft, the room the sea and then I laughed some gloom in me, he depicts a girl fast asleep on a wooden raft with a book draped across her lap and a butterfly perched on her pillow. The raft is placed on a circular pedestal with a glassy finish that imitates a calm pond doted with floating lily pads. Created in the round, the piece invites the viewer to view it at all angles, allowing a silent observation of the sleeping child’s dreams.

My bed a raft, the room the sea and then I laughed some gloom in me is included in his current solo exhibition at Marianne Boesky Gallery in New York through April 6, 2019 alongside a new film titled Staging Silence (3). You can view more of his figural sculptures and installations on his website and Instagram.

"My bed a raft, the room the sea, and then I laughed some gloom in me" (2019), Polyester, polyurethane, steel, polyamide, epoxy, wood, coating.

“My bed a raft, the room the sea, and then I laughed some gloom in me” (2019)

Detail of "My bed a raft, the room the sea, and then I laughed some gloom in me" (2019)

Detail of “My bed a raft, the room the sea, and then I laughed some gloom in me” (2019)

Detail of "My bed a raft, the room the sea, and then I laughed some gloom in me" (2019)

Detail of “My bed a raft, the room the sea, and then I laughed some gloom in me” (2019)

"My bed a raft, the room the sea, and then I laughed some gloom in me" (2019)

“My bed a raft, the room the sea, and then I laughed some gloom in me” (2019)

"Timo (Marbles)" (2018), Polyester, Glass, Coating

“Timo (Marbles)” (2018), Polyester, Glass, Coating

"The Conversation" (2019), wood, polyester, coating

“The Conversation” (2019), wood, polyester, coating

 

 



Photography

A Pair of Sharks Photographed Through a Cresting Wave by Sean Scott

March 5, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

All images by Sean Scott

All images by Sean Scott

Photographer Sean Scott was headed to Red Bluff in Western Australia, a remote camping location where the desert meets the Indian Ocean, when he spotted a giant pack of fish congregated near the shore. Feasting on this bait ball were about 200 bronze whaler sharks which Scott began to follow with his drone. Once the swarm of fish moved a bit closer to land he was able to spot the sharks without the assistance of his elevated camera, and began shooting from his perch on the beach.

“The shore break was quite large so the first wave came and I fired off a test shot to get my exposure and focus right,” explains Scott to Colossal. “The very next wave rose up right on the shore, and sure enough there were 2 big sharks in excess of 2 meters in the wave. I snapped away and ended up with 3 of my favorite shots. I stayed and waited for a further 2 hours and did not see them in that close again.”

Scott was able to capture two locked in a rising wave, caught just as it was swelling to shore. You can see more of his aquatic images on Instagram. (via PetaPixel)