RISD Pre-College Returns to Campus This Summer, Announces Online Option

November 28, 2022

RISD

Artwork by RISD Pre-College student Aviva Cai

At Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) Pre-College, rising high school juniors and seniors can live like RISD students and work alongside hundreds of other creative, highly motivated peers who will inspire them to push their limits and produce their best work. Students will follow a college-level curriculum with day-long studio classes, visits to the Nature Lab and RISD Museum, and critiques and projects that will forever shape the way they approach art and design. Summer 2023 runs from June 24 to July 29.

RISD’s Advanced Program Online is a year-round online intensive designed for high school students interested in pursuing art and design in college. This certificate program is for change-makers who want to develop their art practice, learn new ways to collaborate, and create a future they are excited about. The spring 2023 term runs from March 4 to May 21, and the summer 2023 term runs from June 17 to August 13.

Both programs offer a college-level curriculum that provides a strong foundational understanding of drawing and design principles. Whether on-campus or online, students will participate in courses led by professional instructors, learn to manage their time and self-motivate, and develop a portfolio of concepts, sketches, and finished pieces that can be included in or inform their college application.

To apply for the RISD Pre-College residential summer immersive, visit
precollege.risd.edu/program-overview.

To register for RISD’s Advanced Program Online year-round intensive, visit precollege.risd.edu/advanced-program.

 

 

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Art

In Richly Patterned Portraits, Ruby Sky Stiler Dismantles Art History’s Most Persistent Archetypes

November 28, 2022

Kate Mothes

A geometrically patterned, abstract portrait of two figures and a paint palette.

“Artist with Muse” (2022), acrylic, acrylic resin, paper, glue, and graphite on panel, 60 x 50 inches. All images © Ruby Stiler, shared with permission courtesy of Nicelle Beauchene Gallery, New York

Throughout the history of Western art, certain tropes occur again and again in painting and sculpture. The motif of mother and child has been reflected throughout the centuries in the likeness of the Holy Virgin and infant Christ or in domestic family portraiture, like in the works of Impressionist painter Mary Cassatt, who specialized in the theme. The archetype of the female muse dates back to ancient Greek mythology and religion, when goddesses like Calliope or Melpomene were considered the source of creativity and knowledge. Brooklyn-based artist Ruby Sky Stiler challenges these preconceptions and archetypes in her ongoing series of Relief Paintings.

Stiler’s works play with gender conventions by turning the male subject into a muse for the female artist or representing parenthood through an image of a father with his children. In “Old Woman (Blue),” she taps into society’s lingering taboo of aging, especially for women. “I’ve recently been exploring the trope of the ‘muse’ and placing the male figure as object. And also in the role of parent, which is strikingly uncommon (in contrast to the abundant depictions of mother and child),” she tells Colossal. “I’ve also re-positioned the female figure in the empowered role as The Artist.”

In bold, geometric patterns, Stiler’s subjects are human-scaled and gaze directly at the viewer. Black-and-white, tile-like patterns provide the background for abstracted figures that nod to Cubism—a movement practically synonymous with masculine figures like Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque. Stiler dismantles the “male gaze,” or the lens through which women are depicted as objects of desire for men in visual culture. She explores the notion of the gaze further in the way that the paintings are experienced by the viewer; from far away the outlines of the figures are easy to see, but the closer one gets, the more the fractal-like patterns distort the image.

A monograph of Stiler’s work is scheduled for publication by The Tang Teaching Museum in the spring, and a solo exhibition of her work will open in March 2023 at Nina Johnson Gallery in Miami. She is represented by Nicelle Beauchene, and you can find more of her work on her website and Instagram.

 

A geometrically patterned portrait of a figure holding a cat.

“Cat Sitter” (2022), acrylic paint, acrylic resin, paper, glue, and graphite on panel, 32 x 25 inches

Detail of “Cat Sitter”

A geometrically patterned, abstract portrait of a father holding his two children.

“Father and Children” (2022), acrylic paint, acrylic resin, paper, glue, and graphite on panel, 60 x 50 inches

A detail of a painting showing a hand cradling two small feet.

Detail of “Father and Children”

A geometrically patterned, abstract portrait of three figures in a family.

“Generational Portrait” (2022), acrylic paint, acrylic resin, paper, and glue, 60 x 50 inches

“Old Woman (Blue)” (2022), acrylic paint, acrylic resin, paper, and glue, 18 x 15.5 inches

A geometrically patterned, abstract portrait of a figure seated next to a vase.

“Seated Woman (Facing Left)” (2018), mixed media, 50 x 60 inches

A geometrically patterned, abstract portrait of a parent figure sitting beside a child.

“No Title (Father and Boy” (2020), acrylic paint, acrylic resin, graphite, and paper, 44 x 50 inches

A geometrically patterned, abstract portrait of two women in gold, one holding a flower.

“Women in Gold” (2022), acrylic paint, acrylic resin, paper, glue, and graphite on panel, 32 x 25 inches

 

 



Art Craft

Metal Sculptor Shota Suzuki Crafts Exquisitely Detailed Blooms That Express the Passing of Time

November 25, 2022

Kate Mothes

All images © Shota Suzuki, shared with permission

Tender stems bear lush blooms and windswept leaves gather around new growth in artist Shota Suzuki’s delicate metal sculptures. Rendered in painstaking detail, the forms are inspired by flora around his home and studio in Kyoto, such as Japanese maple trees and dandelions that have gone to seed. “Recently, I have been adding rain and wind to my work,” he tells Colossal, sharing that he’s inspired by the way nature demonstrates the passing of time. He adds silvery water droplets to ginkgo leaves, ruffles the petals of flowers, or portrays a branch of cherry blossoms as if it has blown from a tree.

An early interest in jewelry led Suzuki to study metalworking, and the exquisite detail of florals and foliage suited his ability to work on a small scale. A wide range of patinas create a life-like appearance, achieved by combining an array of chemicals that produce specific hues and textures, including traditional Japanese copper coloration methods such as niiro. “I don’t want to create works in which time stands still,” he says. “I want to express a moment in time.”

Suzuki’s work is included in Natural Mastery: Lacquer and Silver Works from Japan at Stuart Lochhead Sculpture in London from December 1 to 9. You can find more work on his website and Instagram.

 

A realistic sculpture of a tree sapling growing from dead leaves, made from metal.

 A realistic sculpture of flowers made from metal, photographed on a table.

A realistic sculpture of flowers made from metal.

A realistic sculpture of ginkgo leaves made from metal.

A realistic sculpture of a stem of cherry blossoms made from metal.

A realistic sculpture of dried leaves made from metal.

A realistic sculpture of gold ginkgo leaves with silver droplets, made from metal.

 

 



Art History

Art Without Intent Celebrates the Aesthetics and Mysterious Histories of Found Objects

November 25, 2022

Kate Mothes

A vintage head on a stand that reads "desire"

All images © Art Without Intent, shared with permission

“The found object is an illegible, unknowable thing, out of reach even when in hand,” reads a statement of Art Without Intent, both a collaborative project and a way of looking at historic material culture. In March 2022, a group of nine antique and art dealers curated the Found Object Show in New York City. Crackled paint, weathered patinas, eccentric shapes, and amusing juxtapositions characterized the pop-up exhibition of 96 eccentric items.

Removed from their original contexts, transformed by time and the elements, and reinterpreted in a salon-style exhibition, the objects transmit an aesthetic experience similar to viewing art, even if the anonymous makers did not intend to create artworks in any formal sense. “Transformed physically and contextually, a found object sometimes packs the same aesthetic and conceptual punch of conventional art. But without artistic motive nor objective meaning, it must lie in wait to ambush an imagination,” the group explains.

Accessibility is a unique facet of the show, which invites dedicated collectors, history buffs, curious passersby, and children into the showcase, in which all objects are available for sale in a unique art-gallery-meets-antique shop atmosphere. “Art without intent ennobles the random, celebrates the anonymous, and embraces the subjective, empowering individuals to see art where they may least expect to find it.”

The next Found Objects Show will feature eighteen exhibitors and is scheduled for March 24 to 26 with an additional focus on stuffed animals. You can find out more about the project, purchase a catalogue on the website, and follow updates Instagram. (via BoingBoing)

 

Installation view of 'Found Objects Show' in New York City, March 2022

Barbells made from coffee cans.

Items in 'Found Objects Show' in New York City, March 2022

Installation view of 'Found Objects Show' in New York City, March 2022 through a window with a logo in the foreground.

Two images of found objects. Left: Five metallic hands sitting on a concrete surface. Right: Two laced shoes with long leather extensions from the toes.

Installation view of 'Found Objects Show' in New York City, March 2022

Two images of found objects. Left: Two sculptural metallic pieces on stands. Right: Conical forms covered in barnacles.

A piece of wood in a trapezoidal shape with three holes and a comb-like addition on the front.

Installation views of 'Found Objects Show' in New York City, March 2022

An aged wooden box filled with animal skulls.

 

 



Art

Imposing Wild Animals Emerge from Layers of Cardboard in Scott Fife’s Sculptures

November 23, 2022

Grace Ebert

A photo of a cardboard bear bust

“Polar Bear” (2011), archival cardboard, ink, and red pencil, 26 x 53 x 29 inches. Photo by Mark Davidson. All images shared with permission

Armed with glue and screws, artist Scott Fife fashions large-scale creatures from a humble material in an exploration of the relationship between humans and our animal counterparts, particularly those we associate with myth and folklore. The beastly creations emerge in his aptly named solo show Cardboard Kingdom, which is on view now at Traver Gallery in Seattle.

Comprised of fringed layers and patchwork, the animals are wild and expressive, with drowsy, drooping eyes or snarling teeth. Many bear the markings of human touch, with drips of ink and pencil drawings on their faces and bodies. “Physically beautiful, we endear these animals with many meanings. But they are predators and prey in a brutal world. These are portraits of individuals as they are in nature,” he shares.

Cardboard Kingdom is on view through December 22, and you can find more of Fife’s sculptures on his site.

 

A photo of a cardboard lion bust

“Lioness” (2011), archival cardboard, ink, and red pencil, 26 x 53 x 29 inches. Photo by Mark Davison

A photo of a cardboard dog

Detail of “Dog With Picasso Guitar” (2022), archival cardboard, glue, drywall screws, and ink, 14 x 60 x 30 inches. Photo by Traver Gallery

A photo of a cardboard dog

“Dog With Picasso Guitar” (2022), archival cardboard, glue, drywall screws, and ink, 14 x 60 x 30 inches. Photo by Traver Gallery

A photo of a cardboard wolf bust

“Were Wulf” (2007), archival cardboard, ink, and red pencil, 25 x 25 x 34 inches. Photo by Traver Gallery

A photo of a cardboard horse bust

“Horse” (2012), archival cardboard, dry screws, glue, ink, and pencil markings, 46 x 64 x 15 inches. Photo by Traver Gallery

A photo of a cardboard wolf bust

Detail of “Were Wulf” (2007), archival cardboard, ink, and red pencil, 25 x 25 x 34 inches. Photo by Traver Gallery

Scott Fife's sculptures in a gallery

Photo by Traver Gallery

 

 



Shop 20 New Works from Sebastian Foster’s Fall Print Set

November 23, 2022

Sebastian Foster

A print of a fox over a tree stump

Graham Francoise “Old Growth New Life”

Austin-based gallery Sebastian Foster just announced its 2022 Fall Print Set, marking the ten-year anniversary of the collection since it first launched in 2012. The new release features 20 works by well-established illustrators, printmakers, and painters from across the U.S., Canada, U.K., and Europe. Half of the artists have worked with the gallery for years, while the other half are guests who joined just for this collection.

This set features 20 works all published as relatively small editions, signed and numbered by the artists. Encompassing an eclectic array of mediums and themes, the collection showcases works from artists previously featured on Colossal, including Graham Franciose’s dreamlike watercolor works, Diana Sudyka’s fanciful storybook scenes, and Grant Haffner’s vibrant, flat landscapes bisected by his signature utility poles.

Now online-only, Sebastian Foster focuses on original works and prints, publishing over 1,000 editions since opening in the late 2000s. Whether you’re looking for the next piece to add to your collection or for meaningful holiday gifts, head to the gallery’s site to shop the Fall Print Set today.

 

A whimsical print of a fairy with animals

Diana Sudyka “Oak Guardian”

A print of a man standing in front of water

Adam Hall “Awakening”

A print of a vibrant painting of a road and sky

Grant Haffner “Dawn of New Day”

A print of a forest and lit cabins

Jeremy Miranda “Near the Wall”

A print of a portrait of a woman with tattoos

Anne Siems “Shine”

A print of a portrait of a seated woman

Caroline Ji “Sunset of Dissolution”

A print of a surreal work with hands, butterfly wings, and creatures

Mike McGrath “New songs to gently repel and persuade”

A print of a turntable in front of a window

Mike Howat “Circa 1984”

A print of a house and front lawn

Susan Abbott “Night Light”