Art Design

Silicone Formations by Seulgi Kwon Translate Fictionalized Microscopic Organisms into Necklaces, Brooches, and Rings

May 14, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

"Sunday Morning," brooch, silicone, pigment, thread, plastic, fabric, 4.7" x 4.3" x 2.9", all images as courtesy of Mobilia Gallery

“Sunday Morning,” brooch, silicone, pigment, thread, plastic, fabric, 4.7″ x 4.3″ x 2.9″, all images courtesy of Mobilia Gallery

Korean jewelry maker Seulgi Kwon forms silicone into thin, translucent objects meant to be worn on the chest or finger. The glass-like shapes are surrounded by colorful thread, pigment, and paper, which imitate the appearance of microscopic organisms. “At each stage of creation, cells change in form through growth, division, and extinction, creating order and harmony within nature,” she explains in her artist statement. “Using silicone, a synthetic material that can change in texture and transparency, I express the organic movement and shape of cells with their mysterious color and constantly changing forms.”

Kwon is part of an upcoming group exhibition that will explore non-traditional materials in contemporary jewelry titled Material Revolution. The show opens May 15 and runs through June 2, 2019 at at Pistachios in Chicago. You can see more iterations of her wearable silicone sculptures on Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

"An Old Dancer" (2017), Silicone, pigment, thread, plastic, feather, 7.3” x 4” x 3.5”

“An Old Dancer” (2017), Silicone, pigment, thread, plastic, feather, 7.3” x 4” x 3.5”

"Two of pentacles" (2017), brooch, silicone, pigment, thread, plastic, fabric, 7.5” x 4.5” x 2.75”

“Two of pentacles” (2017), brooch, silicone, pigment, thread, plastic, fabric, 7.5” x 4.5” x 2.75”

"On your side" (2015), brooch, silicone, pigment, thread, plastic 5.5” x 3.5” x 2”

“On your side” (2015), brooch, silicone, pigment, thread, plastic 5.5” x 3.5” x 2”

"A Slow Walker," brooch, silicone, pigment, thread, plastic, paper, plastic bead, 6.6" x 8.1" x 1.5" (L) "Swing of the Night," brooch, silicone, pigment, thread, plastic, feather, 9.8" x 6.2" x 3.1" (R)

“A Slow Walker,” brooch, silicone, pigment, thread, plastic, paper, plastic bead, 6.6″ x 8.1″ x 1.5″ (L) “Swing of the Night,” brooch, silicone, pigment, thread, plastic, feather, 9.8″ x 6.2″ x 3.1″ (R)

"Forest of memory," (2017) brooch, silicone, pigment, thread, feather, 9” x 5” x 3.5”

“Forest of memory,” (2017) brooch, silicone, pigment, thread, feather, 9” x 5” x 3.5”

"The Day After," brooch, silicone, pigment, thread, plastic, fabric, 5.9" x 5.5" x 2.7"

“The Day After,” brooch, silicone, pigment, thread, plastic, fabric, 5.9″ x 5.5″ x 2.7″

 

 



Art

Head-Turning Historical Portraits by Ewa Juszkiewicz

May 13, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Ewa Juszkiewicz subverts the traditional notion of female portrait sitters as passive, simple subjects in her subtly unusual oil paintings. The artist constructs each painted portrait using familiar tropes from European art history, sometimes even citing specific paintings as inspiration. Female subjects with smooth, pale skin and luxurious apparel are placed in front of abstract or generically bucolic settings, sometimes with a “gender-appropriate” item in hand, like a paint brush, small book, or feather.

But in place of the beautiful face a viewer would expect in the center of these pleasant trappings, Juszkiewicz has turned the subject’s head 180 degrees to show an elaborate hairstyle, or filled the face with unruly plants or ribbons. A statement on the artist’s website explains, “Through the deconstruction of historical portraits, she undermines their constant, indisputable character and tries to influence the way we perceive them. Juszkiewicz experiments with the form of the female figure and face, balancing on the border between what is human and inhuman.”

The artist lives and works in Warsaw, Poland. She is represented by Galerie Rolando Anselmi in Berlin, where she will have a solo show on view in November and December, 2019. Juszkiewicz shares updates from her work and travels on Instagram.

 

 

 



Art Craft

Beaded Images of Disease Explore the Impact of Colonial Trade

May 13, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

"Bubonic Plague" (2009), Beads and acrylic on suede board, 24" x 18", collection of the MacKenzie Art Gallery

“Bubonic Plague” (2009), Beads and acrylic on suede board, 24″ x 18″, collection of the MacKenzie Art Gallery

In her series Trading, Saskatchewan-based artist Ruth Cuthand creates a visual metaphor that outlines how early settler/Native relationships influenced First Nation people’s living conditions and wellbeing in Canada. The colorful works are created from beads which were traded by European settlers for furs in the Americas. Although dazzling aesthetically, the work’s content reveals images of deadly viruses passed on by settlers as a result of this trade, such as influenza, bubonic plague, measles, smallpox, typhus, cholera, and scarlet fever.

“Beads are a visual reference to colonization; valuable furs were traded for inexpensive beads,” explains Cuthand, an artist of Plains Cree and Scottish descent, in her statement about the project. “On the plains beads were a valuable trade item, they replaced the method of using porcupine quills. Preparing the quills for decorating clothing was a long process that consisted of sorting the quills, preparing vegetal dyes and flattening the quill to sew down in patterns. Obviously beads were quicker to use, covered large areas and came in a wide variety of colors.”

Trading explores the tragic impact of European disease through the lens of one import. You can see all of the works in the series, and learn more about Cuthand’s practice, by visiting her website. The artist will also be a part of Beading Now!, a group exhibition at La Guilde in Montreal, Canada, which runs from May 16 to July 21, 2019.

"Influenza" (2009), Beads and acrylic on suede board, 24" x 18", collection of the Saskatchewan Arts Board

“Influenza” (2009), Beads and acrylic on suede board, 24″ x 18″, collection of the Saskatchewan Arts Board

"Measles" (2009), Beads and acrylic on suede board, 24" x 18", collection of the MacKenzie Art Gallery

“Measles” (2009), Beads and acrylic on suede board, 24″ x 18″, collection of the MacKenzie Art Gallery

"Bubonic Plague" (2009), Beads and acrylic on suede board, 24" x 18", collection of Wally Dion

“Bubonic Plague” (2009), Beads and acrylic on suede board, 24″ x 18″, collection of Wally Dion

"Smallpox" (2009), Beads and acrylic on suede board, 24" x 18", collection of the MacKenzie Art Gallery

“Smallpox” (2009), Beads and acrylic on suede board, 24″ x 18″, collection of the MacKenzie Art Gallery

"Typhoid Fever" (2009), Beads and acrylic on suede board, 24" x 18", collection of the MacKenzie Art Gallery

“Typhoid Fever” (2009), Beads and acrylic on suede board, 24″ x 18″, collection of the MacKenzie Art Gallery

"Whooping Cough" (2009), Beads and acrylic on suede board, 24" x 18", collection of the MacKenzie Art Gallery

“Whooping Cough” (2009), Beads and acrylic on suede board, 24″ x 18″, collection of the MacKenzie Art Gallery

"Yellow Fever" (2009), Beads and acrylic on suede board, 24" x 18", collection of the Mendel Art Gallery

“Yellow Fever” (2009), Beads and acrylic on suede board, 24″ x 18″, collection of the Mendel Art Gallery

 

 



Art

An Endlessly Looping Path of Water Rushes Over Gallery Walls and Floors

May 13, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

In Lupanar, an installation by French artist Nicolas Tourte, water flows on a never-ending path over the floor, walls, and ceiling of an art gallery. Displayed in a darkened room, the slithering 130-foot route shows a continuous video loop, which includes the rushing sound of the white-capped waves as they surge across the room. A statement about Lupanar on the artist’s website explains that the installation is meant to provoke thoughts about time and its persistent push through our individual and collective human experience.

The piece was originally shown in 2015 as part of the festival Interstice #10 in Caen, France, and was most recently exhibited at Base Sous-Marine, a former submarine base built during World War II, in Bordeaux. You can see more work from Tourte on his website and Instagram. (via Trendland)

 

 

 



Art

Human Anatomy Baked Into Polymer Desserts by QimmyShimmy

May 12, 2019

Andrew LaSane

Singapore-based mixed media artist QimmyShimmy uses polymer clay to craft baby figures and sugary treats that blend fantasy and reality in interesting and often disturbing ways. From tiny anatomical heart pies to baby head lollipops, the surreal sculptures are a trick and a treat wrapped in one confusing but attractive package.

Formally trained in graphic design, QimmyShimmy tells Colossal that sculpting was a self-taught skill inspired by the desire to do something different. “It is a mix of wanting to do something really whacky apart from my design work, and also a little voice in my head that just wants to make strange, surprising things.” The oven-baked clay is formed and painted by hand and sometimes placed on common dessert settings, which makes the stark contrast of the imagery more apparent.

While the work has been called pop-surrealist and even creepy, QimmyShimmy says that was never the intention. “My works have always been about finding the balance between sweetness and horror, and trying to find a way a viewer can look at them and feel repulsed yet enticed. That is the reason why I work often with subjects that we desire—desserts, pastries, etc. I grew up quite an oddball with an overly imaginative mind, and wonder if things are more than what we think they are. With my work I try to push our preconceived ideas and associations with objects, which dark humor seem quite effective in doing so.”

To see more of the artist’s unsettling creations, follow QimmyShimmy on Instagram.

 

 



Art

Radiant Flowers Overlook Lyon, France in New Mural by INTI

May 11, 2019

Andrew LaSane

For the Peinture Fraiche Festival, Chilean street artist INTI recently painted a large-scale mural on a building in Lyon, France. Titled “SOLEIL” (Blinded by the Light), the piece features a sun-shaped bouquet of flowers framing, obstructing, and fusing with the face of a cosmic figure that stands several stories tall.

The wall art uses INTI’s signature violet and orange-gold hues to draw the eye to the top of the building. Varied shades of orange give the flowers depth as they become the figure’s face and shirt. The purple of her neck provides a glimpse of space littered with plastics and other objects, and a closer look past the scissors and down the streaking grey tones of the arms reveals a bird clutched in one of the hands of the mysterious giant.

Click here for a film of the painting process shot by ChopEmDown Films, and follow INTI on Instagram for more behind-the-scenes and completed wall views.

 

 



Art

Imaginative Botanical Ceramics Invent New Fruits and Flowers

May 10, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Ceramic artist Kaori Kurihara’s textured ceramics reference familiar botanicals like durian, cauliflower, and bananas, while maintaining an otherworldly element of surprise. The artist adds organic details like articulated fronds and streaked or dimpled skin by hand, while working in part from her imagination. In a statement  she shares, “I take inspiration from the plant world with particular attention to forms and their geometric repetition. Every element of nature seems to repeat itself, but in fact there is an infinite variety of it. I have the deep desire to make concrete the fruits represented in my mind and to be able to contemplate them through my own eyes.”

Kurihara learned the art of pottery in her native Japan, at SEIKA University in Kyoto. She has further refined her craft as a resident of France, where she has studied jewelry-making, which includes techniques like enameling that the artist now uses in her sculptures.

The artist has exhibited widely and will be showing her work at the International Fine Art and Craft Biennial in Paris from May 23-26, 2019, as well as at the Bernardaud Foundation in June, 2019. Take a peek inside her studio via the video below, and on Instagram and Facebook. If you enjoy Kurihara’s work, also check out William Kidd’s inventive and organically-inspired ceramics.