Art Craft

Coral-Inspired Vessels Formed From Thousands of Individually-Applied Porcelain Fragments by Olivia Walker

August 8, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

London and Barcelona-based ceramicist Olivia Walker produces works in porcelain that address the ideas of growth and decay through additive and subtractive processes. After creating her initial shape on a potter’s wheel, Walker attaches thousands of individually-applied fragments that appear like organic growths. “I start from a set point on a bowl, and let these organic accretions spread out and grow – eating through, or growing over the form beneath,” she explains. “These make reference to organisms – fungus, coral, and bacteria – but are unidentifiable.”

Walker’s vessels are currently a part of the New Member Showcase at CAA Gallery in London through August 31, 2018. She will also be showing her sculptures at the British Craft Pavilion as a part of the London Design Festival from September 20-23, 2018. You can see more of her porcelain works on Instagram.

 

 



Sponsor

Momentum Celebrates Art and Music with a Free Festival in Toledo, Ohio (Sponsor)

August 7, 2018

Colossal

For three days in September, Toledo’s favorite waterfront park will be transformed by dynamic interactive art projects, art exhibitions and performances, innovative music across a spectrum of genres, and a Mini Maker Faire.

From large scale art installations including Fantastic Planet by Parer Studio and the Compound Camera by Pneuhaus to specially commissioned interactive artworks from regional artists, visitors will find a diverse mix of hands-on art experiences. Exhibitions will showcase Toledo’s rich history as the birthplace of the studio glass movement and current knowledge base in the glass industry.

Musical guests Orquesta Akokán will bring their big band collective of the finest Cuban musicians both young and old. The Toledo Symphony Orchestra will perform “Water Concerto” by composer Tan Dun (Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon). A wide range of regional and local musicians and performers will be active in the park throughout the festival.

The Toledo Mini Maker Faire features more than 20 makers with demonstrations and hands-on activities. Maker Faire is the Greatest Show (and Tell) on Earth—a family-friendly showcase of invention, creativity and resourcefulness, and a celebration of the Maker Movement. Makers range from tech enthusiasts to crafters to homesteaders to scientists to garage tinkerers of all ages and backgrounds.

The 2018 Momentum festival will be held September 13-15 in Promenade Park and the surrounding area including Imagination Station. Learn more at momentumtoledo.org and follow along on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

Momentum is presented by The Arts Commission, The Toledo Symphony, and  ProMedica with the support of Toledo’s philanthropic community. 

 

 



Art

Life-Size Animals Emerge from Persian Rugs in Perception-Defying Sculptures by Debbie Lawson

August 7, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

“Red Bear”

British sculptor Debbie Lawson works in the space between two and three dimensions, forming wild animals that emerge from old-fashioned rugs. The artist builds her animals from scratch, using chicken wire and masking tape, and then covers them with identical or near-identical Persian carpets to create the illusion that the creature is fused with the hanging rug.

Lawson explains to Colossal, “I have always ‘accidentally’ spotted images in patterns, on textured walls and floors made of wood or lino – any material really. It’s an obsession that I decided to explore in the studio, using first wood grain and then carpet to make work in which the pattern morphed into an actual image or form…More recently I have focussed on animal forms to explore the idea of camouflage, and of its opposite: display.”

Red Bear is on display until August 19 2018 at the Royal Academy of Arts in London as part of the 250th Summer Exhibition curated by Grayson Perry. Persian bear is permanently displayed (along with a moose in the same style) at London’s Town Hall Hotel. You can see more of Lawson’s finished works and take peeks into her studio process on Instagram. (via Hi-Fructose)

“Red Bear Head”

“White Stag”

“Red Bear Head” and “White Stag” (detail)

“Persian Bear”

 

 



Design

A Series of Japanese Benches Showcase How Pencils Are Made

August 7, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Images via @pomo

A series of benches that surround the Mitsubishi Pencil headquarters in Tokyo give step-by-step instructions for how the brand’s pencils are made. The concrete and wood furniture dot the perimeter, adding a creative touch to the public space just beyond the company’s walls. (via Spoon & Tamago)

 

 



Art

Mischievous Wooden Trolls Take Over an Arboretum in Northern Illinois

August 7, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

This summer, Danish artist Thomas Dambo (previously) has brought his fun-loving and kid-friendly trolls to the Morton Arboretum near Chicago, Illinois. Six site-specific characters range from Joe the Guardian surveying the neighboring highway to Sneaky Socks Alexa hidden in a cluster of shrubs. Dambo constructed the large storybook creatures using reclaimed wood sourced from fallen trees and branches as well as retired pallets and packing crates. Each figure towers up to thirty feet tall, with reclining Little Artur stretching sixty feet long. The exhibition, titled Troll Hunt, marks the Copenhagen-based artist’s first large-scale show in the United States. You can see Dambo’s fantastical creations at the Arboretum through the end of 2018 (and possibly into 2019, weather-dependent). Follow along with his creations on Facebook.

 

 



Photography

The Neon Archives: An Exploration of Hong Kong’s Fading Neon Landscape

August 6, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Hong Kong has long been infused with the glowing haze produced by its omnipresent neon signs and advertisements. Recently this saturated element of the city has begun to disappear as maintenance and rent costs rise and government regulation steps in. Local photographer Dennis Isip intends to preserve this aspect of his city’s history through a series titled The Neon Archives.

Started in 2017, the ongoing photography series captures this retreating feature of the city’s culture with images that preserve Hong Kong’s vivid nightlife. “Neon lights define Hong Kong’s character and without it, the city’s identity is lost,” he tells Colossal. “The Neon Archives hope is to capture each neon sign in Hong Kong before they fade away.” (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art

New Installations by Seth Globepainter Explore the Innocence and Wonder of Childhood

August 6, 2018

Sasha Bogojev

French artist Julien Malland aka Seth Globepainter (previously) continues to create childhood-inspired interventions around Paris and the world. Earlier this year he had a major museum solo show at MoCA Shanghai which included elaborate sculptures and site-specific installations. He also painted one of his largest pieces to date on the banks of the Seine in Paris, and took part in a creation associated with the upcoming museum of street art at the Mausa Vauban. Malland’s poetic murals resonate with audiences of all ages.

“Sweetness and innocence from childhood regularly contrasts with the chaotic environments I choose to put them in,” the artist tells Colossal. He often places the children in environments with books as a reference to their imagination and creativity. After intensively traveling to over fifty countries during the last two decades, Malland is very much aware of the way globalization and modernization are influencing local traditions. “We read less and less with the proliferation of screen habits,” he explains. “While reading we create our own images suggested by words. The screen makes us lazy and spoils our imagination.”

Eight years after his first visit to Shanghai, Malland went back to the city this March to introduce a large project which took place both inside MoCA Shanghai and in its old alleys. Focused on the idea of childhood memories, the outdoor interventions were cleverly created on crumbling buildings and in deserted side streets. The works depicted children playing emblematic games of the ’70s and ’80s, and evoked the atmosphere of the once lively neighborhood. “The vanishing traditional way of life is being replaced by a more common consumer society,” he explains. “This kind of transformation is worldwide, but it’s faster and more sudden in China. Painting those emptied neighborhoods gives me the opportunity to highlight this metamorphosis and continue to explore the traditional Chinese habits that still intrigue me.”

A few months later he took part in a project initiated by Itinerrance Gallery and the Paris City Hall, painting the banks of Seine along with 1010, Momies, and Nebay. The four artists created a long stream of colorful artwork that following the riverbed for a little bit over a mile. Along with 1010’s trompe l’oeil abstraction of an abyss, Momies’ graphic composition in the colors of the French flag, and Nebay’s calligraphy, Malland painted an anamorphic piece visible exclusively from the Pont de la Concorde. The work depicted a child sailing on a paper boat through a rainbow vortex—another incarnation of his imagery that speaks about the purity and boundlessness of children’s imagination and spirit.

Finally, back in June this year he created two pieces inside of Mausa Vauban, an upcoming museum of street art in Neuf-Brisach, France. Once again he explored the idea of children at play. One work is a compelling installation of a little boy breaking a wall and leaving a pile of colorful bricks stacked around the room and an open passageway. Malland is currently preparing for solo shows in London (November 2018), and Shaghai (January 2019), as well as an outdoor project in a pediatric hospital in the US, and is also working on several new books. You can follow his travels throughout the globe on Instagram.

 

 

A Colossal

Highlight

Sailing Ship Kite