Art Craft

Knitted Camouflage’s Models Blend into the Background in a New Art Book

September 24, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Last year, we shared Joseph Ford and Nina Dodd’s collaborative project that featured people sporting custom-knit ensembles that perfectly melded with their environment. Since then, the photographer and knitter duo have been hard at work creating new pairings that disguise watermelons as bananas, farmers as their cows, and commuters as the escalators they ascend. Invisible Jumpers, their book published by Hoxton Mini Press, documents the Knitted Camouflage project’s best work. See more from the series on Ford’s website and Instagram and pick up a book from Hoxton (currently shipping internationally) or place a pre-order for U.S. delivery on Amazon.

 

 



Design

Sprout Oak and Avocado Trees on Your Windowsill with Ilex Studio’s Specially Designed Glass Vases

September 23, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Ilex Studio’s avocado and acorn vases give new trees a head start while adding some greenery to your interior space. Riffing on the age-old technique of using crossed toothpicks or grilling skewers to balance sprouting plants over water, the uniquely shaped glass vessels are comprised of a large, flat-bottomed bulb topped with a smaller open-topped “cup”. The top holds the seed while keeping it dry, and the neck and water-filled base below allow roots to expand. Once the young tree has sufficiently sprouted and is ready to be planted in soil, the Ilex vase can help another one take root. The vases are available on Ilex’s website. (via Design Milk)

 

 



Photography Science

Lightning Scribbles Across the Sky in Dramatic Footage of Extreme Storms Around the U.S.

September 23, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Arizona-based storm chaser and videographer Dustin Farrell just released “Transient 2”, the sequel to his 2017 film. For roughly three and a half minutes, the skies open up to reveal flashes of lightning and billowing clouds rolling across open plains. Farrell shares that he traveled 35,000 miles over two years to shoot the raw footage, and spent about 300 hours editing. To capture the brief but powerful flashes of lightning, Farrell relied on his Phantom Flex 4K, shooting at very high speeds. The short film’s music is by Harry Lightfoot. You can tag along with Farrell’s travels from the safety of your couch via Instagram and YouTube.

 

 



Art Design

Sebastian Brajkovic’s Distorted Furniture Unites the Past, Present, and Future

September 23, 2019

Anna Marks

Amsterdam-based designer Sebastian Brajkovic’s (previously) distorted sculptural forms look as though traditional French furniture has been pulled through a time loop. Brajkovic’s work—part furniture, part sculpture—explores the process of distorting interior designs and the effect his skewed pieces have on human perception and emotion.

Brajkovic’s interest in distorting interior objects such as tables and chairs originated in childhood where he began experimenting in fine art before transferring his skills to three-dimensional forms. During his studies at Design Academy Eindhoven, Brajkovic began combining art with conceptual design, eventually settling his artistic style on ‘stretching’ traditional furniture into twisting sculptures. “My inspirations comes from anything that tells a story of movement,” Brajkovic tells Colossal. “I like the aspect that time is visible in the work that I make. So I seek for literal explanations—things untwining or extruding, growing and becoming older, metaphysical experiences, and surreal vision.”

Brajkovic ‘deconstructs’ historical designs—the patterns, detail and structure appears similar to the furniture found in the Queen’s Apartment in the Palace of Versailles. By basing his work on the patterns and form found in historical design, Brajkovic unites the past, present and future, and while his sculptures stand tall as sculptural forms, they also work as functional objects. “My pieces are made constructively out of bronze,” Brajkovic explains. “Then there is upholstery on the bronze. I like this juxtaposed combination of hard/cold and soft/warm material. After this, there is metal (bronze or copper) hand embroidery usually on the works that might give the feeling of bronze structure that goes further into the surface of the fabric.”

Brajkovic’s work resides in permanent art collections across the globe, including the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston and New York’s Museum of Arts and Design. His current exhibition at the David Gill Gallery in London runs through October 17, 2019.

Learn more about his exhibition and visit his website and Instagram pages to see more of his work.

 

 



Art

Pink Inflatable Tubes and Spheres Form Immersive Pyramid Installations by Cyril Lancelin

September 22, 2019

Andrew LaSane

All images: Cyril Lancelin / town and concrete

French artist Cyril Lancelin recently designed two inflatable structures for the Made in America Festival in Philadelphia. Constructed out of nylon fabric, the installations feature repeated geometric shapes that expand to form giant pink pyramids.

Guests enter Pyramid Sphere through a tunnel that is intersected by round holes on left and right faces of the pyramid. The windows let in additional light and also allow those inside to peer out to the rest of the world. Pyramid Tube has no clear entrance or exit. Visitors are expected to navigate the spaces between where the tubes meet and where the structure meets the ground.

To create the massive inflatable forms, Lancelin used parametric modeling software. From corner to corner and from base to tip, the fully inflated Pyramid Tube and Pyramid Sphere structures are just shy of 33 and 40 feet, respectively. The artist explains that during the manufacturing process, designs are adjusted to fit the technical data and to account for factors such as air resistance, structure resistance, and budget. 3D software is used to create a flat template, which each piece fitting together like a puzzle.

“When I design an immersive installation, I like the visitor to be totally in the sculpture,” Lancelin told Colossal. “I found that inflatables were a good way to make monumental installations, but also using as [little] material as possible, and being very light for shipping.”

To see more of Cyril Lancelin’s brightly colored inflatables as well as his steel sculptures, follow the artist on Instagram.

 

 



Art Photography

Elaborate Underground Architecture of Soviet Metro Stations Photographed by Christopher Herwig

September 21, 2019

Andrew LaSane

Tashkent. All images: Christopher Herwig

After traveling to 15 cities in 7 countries and taking over 15,000 photographs, Christopher Herwig (previously) has compiled a new book that showcases the diverse architecture of every underground metro station in the former U.S.S.R. Soviet Metro Stations provides rare look at mansion-quality chandeliers, ornate columns, and patterned ceilings that surround millions of commuters every day.

With a background in travel photography and documentary work for UNICEF and other United Nations agencies, Herwig was first introduced to the region while traveling through Russia via train. He later lived in Kazakhstan and most recently Jordan, where he continued to work professionally as a photographer.

Herwig explains that he became interested in the underground architecture of the stations while visiting Moscow and Tashkent. Because many of the metro stations were used as nuclear bomb shelters, they were considered military sites and photographing them was prohibited. “Although I likely could have gotten away with a few images I really wanted to do the series properly and cover all the cities in the former USSR with metro lines not just a few flashy ones in Moscow,” he told Colossal. “With restriction being lifted in many of the cities it meant I could have a go at it.”

Baku

Herwig’s images take viewers on a journey through the architectural and political influences of decades pasts. Soviet-era symbols, relief sculptures of significant events and figures, and displays of opulence cover every square meter of the well-maintained subterranean spaces. Often making early morning and late night trips into the stations, Herwig says that many of the otherwise busy hubs appear to be abandoned because of his goal to “use people with purpose and not to distract from the space and design of the stations.”

Soviet Metro Stations, published by FUEL, lands on September 24 and is available for pre-order today via Amazon. To see more of Christopher Herwig’s photography, follow along with his travels on Instagram.

Petersburg

Kiev

Kkarkiv

Novosibirsk

Tashkent

KryvyiRih

Moscow

Soviet Metro Stations

 

 



Art

Multi-Layered Oil Paintings by Jacob Brostrup Blur Natural and Built Environments

September 19, 2019

Laura Staugaitis


Spectacularly detailed paintings by Jacob Brostrup layer indoor and outdoor scenes in luminescent colors. The artist renders each component of his oil paintings with exacting, realistic detail, but the overlapping narratives of time and place create a dreamlike state. Old-fashioned architectural features, particularly staircases and windows, are common visual elements alongside fallen trees and marshy bodies of water. Brostrup, who is Danish, also spends part of his time in Barcelona. The artist graduated from the Danish National School of Design in Copenhagen. He is represented by Kirk Gallery in Allborg, Denmark, which hosted his most recent shows in 2019; Galeria Contrast in Barcelona; and Galleri Franz Pedersen in Horsens. Explore more of Brostrup’s transfixing paintings on Instagram (we’re loving his recent works with swimming pool motifs) and Artsy. (Thnx, Tanis!)